Smartphones

Poll: When asked, what smartphone platform do you recommend?

Technologists are regularly asked for buying recommendations and TechRepublic wants to know the smartphone platform you recommend to users.

Photo credit: iStockphoto/arakonyunus

If your family and friends describe your job as "works with computers" then it's highly likely that the most frequent question you are asked these days is no longer "which computer should I buy?" but "which smartphone should I get?"

Some of that is due to the fact that people refresh their smartphones more than their computers and some of it is due to the fact that there are plenty of people who are still transitioning from traditional cellphones to smartphones. Whatever the case may be, TechRepublic would like to know which smartphone platform you recommend when users approach you for advice.

Anecdotally, one of the interesting things we've seen is that even some professionals who are Android and Blackberry enthusiasts are recommending the iPhone to average users. This is especially true if those users live in a city where there's an Apple Store, because then if the users have problems with the device they can take it into the Apple Store instead of coming back and pestering the techie who recommended the phone.

Let us know which platform you recommend by answering the poll and then jump into the discussion below to explain why.

Take the poll

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

60 comments
ScottyJavea
ScottyJavea

Android ICS 4.0.3 Having said that ... the OS is becoming irrelevant ... the front end with an "easy-to-use" interface that works properly is more important. Access to free or cheap apps is a plus ... Android has Play Store, SlideME and GetJar, so not tied to one source only like the iPhone. The disadvantage of Android is the tendency for hardware suppliers to tinker so to make this OS better behind the scenes Google needs to exert some control. But I will stick with Android devices having used them quite happily from version 2.1. ScottyJavea

d_baron
d_baron

what matters is that is does the job you need/want, effectively, pleasantly. All OS-eology aside. So: Try 'em out. Despite the President's love for his device, Blackberry is, unfortunately, iffy right now. Remember, they, not Apple invented the genre. Like Metro, soon they'll be a zillion apps just like the others. Like guaranteed satisfaction, try iPhones. Geek--Android is good for this. Final analysis: The first paragraph.

rodd.holman
rodd.holman

Like most folks here, I get asked this question. Last week it was my daughter who works in IT. My response was pretty much what people have been saying. It depends on who you are and what you want to do. If you live in the i-verse (Mac, ipod, itunes, etc) get an iphone. You're there all ready and it works with everything you do. If you're a Google docs/apps, GMail, etc person go Android. If you want a phone to do all the basic web/email/social/games stuff and don't tinker with it, get an iphone. If you play with, experiment, or do remote adminstration tasks, get an Android. Unless BB and WP8 really pull out all stops and do something spectacular this year, I don't plan on recommending either. Of course the greatest point of recommendation is what is the coverage of your local carrier and what data network and phone options do they give you? That may override any of the above recommendations.

jeb.hoge
jeb.hoge

It has a lot to do with their existing "environment." One of the first things I'll ask is if the person uses Apple/iPod/iTunes. If the answer is "no," then that knocks iOS way down the list. If it's "yes," then iOS is much more logical to recommend. I'll also ask if they use GMail. If that's a "yes," then Android may make more sense. BUT, and this is a big point, it's important to ask what they want out of a phone. I know someone who wanted to get a keyboard to send text messages and the salesweasel put a Droid 2 in her hand and said "well, you'll need this" despite her lack of interest in any smartphone functionality.

T3CHN0M4NC3R
T3CHN0M4NC3R

These days, I find that Sony Mobile (Ericsson no longer applicable) is the best Android phone maker that makes Android phone work out of the box delivering similar (if not better) experience to the iPhone. Second place perhaps would go to Motorola. Windows phone 7 is still relatively new. Unless you have needs for deep integration with Microsoft infrastructure, I see no reason to get it. App makers still make better apps on Android and Apple. I personally can't recommend Blackberry. The way it works is just too ridiculous.

chrisbedford
chrisbedford

I just came across The Oatmeal's post on Smartphones. In it, this quote: "You bring up war, poverty, or famine in conversation and you???ll find a barren vacuum of opinions. You announce what kind of phone you have and you???ll spend the next hour enduring and obnoxious holy war" Never were truer words spoken. Or blogged, or whatever. The full entry is at theoatmeal [dot] com [slash] comics [slash] smartphone

qhcomputingny
qhcomputingny

I recommend Windows Phone all the way. Much better and more intuitive than iPhone and Android phones.

Vladio
Vladio

For some reason I have grown to like android. It does what I need, you can customize it when you wish, my wife loves it too. The cost / performance is what I love most, even small low cost phones can run android, as well as bigger, dualcore ones.

artlife
artlife

After using an Evo(Sprint), switched to iPhone(AT&T) like the rest of the family, purely for coverage reasons. If there was 4G in my new home & work area I would still be on the Evo. Simple things like being able to put a temporary post-it on my main screen (and having 5 screens to configure). iPhone you actually have to create an icon to put a reminder on the screen. The iTunes app market also does not have several excellent apps I used on my Evo. iCloud also is annoying if you don't have a separate account for each family member. If hubby downloads an iPad app that's iPhone-able, it pops up on my phone. It's been my conclusion that the jokes they used to make about Windows (windows users are dumb, mac users are hip and savvy) is the opposite. The "it just works" iOS is the made-for-dummies interface. Sadly the iPhone was more expensive and the AT&T contract also way more expensive. But as hubby points out, if you can't get a signal or the call is dropped, doesn't matter how much you like your phone, and the iPhones and other iOS devices do work well with each other. I am hoping that by the time our contracts are up, that this whole area is 4G and we can go back to Sprint and save $$.

5haggi
5haggi

... when people recommend 'any' of those options. Apart from those people who recommend Blackberry! o-0

pethers
pethers

If someone asks me - then I recommend either iPhone or Android. If they just want something that will work and is simple, iPhone. If they are a bit more tech savvy and want more customisation, Android. Windows Phone is just stupid - got that stupid bad use of screen space layout going on. Metro is even more boring and ugly than iOS - looks like its been designed by Fisher Price for 5 year olds.

jjvolk
jjvolk

It's just like the early days of personal computers. There was IBM and Microsoft vs Apple. Today it's primarily Google vs Apple. We all know that Microsoft won the desktop OS war. It seems that today Google is winning the Phone OS war. Apple is restrictive! Only apps from iTunes can be downloaded to iPhone (or iPad or ITouch). Just like IBM tried to restrict the hardware in the early computing days Apple restricts the users to what they can and cannot have. I don't like any impingement on my freedom. I think that is why the clone computer manufacturers and Windows won over Apple before and why Google will win over Apple NOW. We are Americans. We want our freedom from tyranny! Apple is a Tyrant! Google's OS's allow freedom to root or not root. To side load apps. To choose from various sources for apps, not just the Google Market (Play) or Amazon Android Market. Android is to phones what Windows was to the PC. Give me Freedom or give me Death!

bburgess66
bburgess66

I have to go along with 'ha(k3r40rl1f3' here. I have everything except Blackberry in my arsenal of devices to develop apps for .. In the 'consumer' arena, Android seems the most versatile by far .. from a users point of view

rhonin
rhonin

Write down what you need your phone to do and what you want to do with it. Find phones that fit this and then goes try them hands on. Make a decision. Buy. If you don't like it, use the return period. Not that hard as long as you dont "predetermine" your device. And , have fun.

Medugno
Medugno

Windows phone 7 if it's available at the persons provider. If not then it's a judgement call between Android and iPhone depending on who the phone is for.

scratch4653
scratch4653

The initial equipment cost is not the only cost factor...

slobodan.hajdin
slobodan.hajdin

For bling and simplicity I recommend iPhone, with notification about restrictions. For all-around device with unrestricted capabilities, Android.

bloodynellie
bloodynellie

It depends: techie -> android dummy -> ithing start again to unify house with all family phones ->[s] ithings[/s]

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Sorry, I don't have any experience to base a recommendation on. I don't answer questions regarding the best gaming console either, for the same reason.

WDMilner
WDMilner

Depends on the person and their application. I've recommended iPhones (reluctantly), Android based phones, Windows phones (reluctantly), Blackberry and even plain old basic cell phones that just do one thing very well - make phone calls. There is no perfect solution for everyone. Personally for a smartphone I prefer Blackberry.

dlharned
dlharned

Android is the only way to go. iPhone OS is too limited and cumbersome to use.

Richaz
Richaz

We have been moving away from Blackberry and are mostly a mix iPhones and Android right now. Still have die hard BB users that love the keyboards. Everyone has their preferences. Myself I am getting to liking the windows phone. The Lync client, OneNote and email has been great. The live tiles is also very nice. Its been stable and never have issues with it hanging.

eman08
eman08

What about QNX neutrino thats powering RIM BlackBerry PlayBook.? Research In Motion will be releasing a new BlackBerry smart phone's called "Super Phones" with multi core processing running the new BlackBerry OS 10 based on QNX Neutrino that exact same OS thats on the PlayBook. BlackBerry is known for their military/goverment grade security. Many people don't know that QNX neutrino embedded realtime OS is found in running Nuclear power plants, Military Equipment, Areo Space Defense, Medical Equipment, high end industrial and enterprise Cisco Systems Routers, cruise control system in your car, Military Defense, BlackBerry PlayBook, and new coming BlackBerry smart phones called "Super Phones" and much more. Not to mention RIM owns QNX Software Systems. QNX is the world leader in the most highly advanced technological real time embedded operatings on earth as QNX uses a microkernel. QNX is known for their military grade security, reliablity, powerful real time multi tasking OS on the market. RIM also intergrates Android runtime in their QNX OS which allows users to install and run Android applications on a BlackBerry devices along with BlackBerry's own native applications and Adobe Air Apps. Thats like having two OS on one single device. Look out people Research In Motion is making moves!!

valcomh
valcomh

I am concerned about ALL smart phones these days. I had a chance to monitor a wireless router in an office and I was amazed at the number of times phones were communicating with GOOGLE or APPLE (droid or Iphone). When I asked the owner of the phone if they were browsing, they all said the smart phone was in idle mode. SO...what is GOOGLE and APPLE doing communicating with these phones??? When I checked with the carrier, Verfizon, they said they were unaware of any security issues with their smart phones that they sell, but they too were surprised with the amount of communication going on between GOOGLE and APPLE via wirless or broadband... The only phone I monitored that did not communicte other than to download email were the Blackberry phones.

sjdorst
sjdorst

Like most who already commented, my recommendation comes down to: Tech Savvy? Android Not? iPhone

MihaiT.
MihaiT.

As someone else already mentioned, iPhone for the average Joe. They're stupid-proof. For a power-user, Android is better. I use Android, but I would recommend iPhone for regular Joes. If you're the kind of owner that likes to tinker with the device, install all sorts of software under the motto "what happens if I push that button" and if you don't mind flashing/reflashing your phone, then Android is the phone for you. For everybody else that wants to call people, text/socialize with them, email them, show off where you had your breakfast/lunch/dinner and have some entertainment on the phone with a good battery life, iPhone then. Safe platform to do all of that and it also comes with most stuff you'll want already on it. Blackberry would probably work too but it lacks the bling-blings. It all comes down to what you want from a smartphone.

JJFitz
JJFitz

If you do any research before you choose a family dog as your first dog you will find a common sentence in the description of certain breeds. That is, "This is a great breed but it is not for everyone." Trust me, that's not a snobby statement. It's practical advice. If all you want to do is read and reply to email, text messages, and Tweets, update your facebook status, play games, answer the phone, change the cover once in a while, and don't want to think about it, then the iPhone is for you. Maybe the Windows Phone too. Maybe a lower end Android would work. If you like to tinker with your smartphone and want to really personalize it with a custom ROM, try out lots of apps from lots of "App Stores", have a larger screen, want removable memory, want to have a spare battery that is easy to put in, want to tether things to it, and overclock it, all while running the risk of exposure to malware and possibly crashing it, then I would recommend a higher end Android. If you don't even know what tether and overclock means or you don't want to take responsibility for what you do or install on the smartphone, then you are probably not going to want a higher end Android. This is not the breed for everyone and I don't mean that in a snobby way. Get a Boston Terrier as your first dog. Do not get a Black Russian Terrier. ;)

TrajMag
TrajMag

There is only one platform that AFAIK doesn't or hasn't quietly phoned home and dumped all of your personal information and is not known for being susceptible to being hacked. Blackberry is still the security leader and should be the recommendation for anyone that plans to use their phone for anything but phone calls. Let the bashing begin.

JJFitz
JJFitz

I support the Blackberries at my company. You can require a password to unlock and not require one to answer a ring. What you can't do is dial a number except an emergency number without unlocking it. That is an annoyance.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

... though that recommendation can and will change if the situation warrants it, such as network inaccessibility. This doesn't mean I won't recommend Android or the Windows phones because some people simply need something with a different form factor--like hardware keys. One brand I don't recommend however, is any of the Blackberry phones because I've watched even people who are used to their Blackberrys have problems simply accessing the dialer or other apps which should be a simply one-click process. Why, for instance, should you have to enter your password when the phone is ringing and you simply want to answer it? For those who say the Win8 phones will take over the market, please keep in mind that Win8 first has to overcome years of bad rep from the earlier WinMob versions that were anything but stable. I'm not saying it's bad, but I really don't see it having a significant effect on the market when WP7 still hasn't stopped Microsoft's mobile slide. Android? It's a techie's OS crippled by far too much hardware variance for fully stable use by consumers. More and more I'm watching people complain about Android--mostly because of the hardware issues. I'm not saying Android is bad, but it has totally been screwed by simply having too many cooks in the kitchen. As such, I recommend an OS based on the person's needs and available capabilities. Since most of my clients are consumers, I consider the iPhone the best, if not the cheapest, choice available.

owner
owner

I like the openness of it. The lack of openness with the iPhone and iPad is exactly why I wouldn't recommend those. It's also one of the problems I have with some of the proprietary Android interfaces like the Kindle Fire. I think usability wise, the Android is just as easy to use. I think the argument that Apple has more in its store and what is in the Google market. Have you ever tried wade through the Google market? There are more than enough apps there to keep you busy for years.

technomom_z
technomom_z

If a person wants phone that is a full-fledged pocket computer, I recommend Android. If a person wants a phone that does phone calls and maybe a couple of other things, I recommend Windows Phone. If they want a tablet, I recommend Kindle Fire if they want to do mostly read/watch/listen, iPad if they want more than that.

FlagstaffCJ
FlagstaffCJ

I personally use an Android and will for the foreseeable future. Heck I even develop for Android in my spare time. But frankly when my parents asked what I recommended, I said iPhone. It's just too stupid proof not to. Since I'm going to be the person they call when they can't figure something out, I want to minimize or eliminate those calls as much as possible. iPhone simply is the best for that. Now for any tech-savvy person I whole-heartily recommend the Android. It's just too much fun to mess with and there's more you can do with it. I make fun of my IT co-workers who have iPhones. They obviously need training wheels to use a phone. :-)

techrepublic@
techrepublic@

Around here, iPhones have the highest price tag, both with front payment and contract, in all carriers.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

"Don't count your chickens until they're hatched." Right now you're only speculating about RIM just as he was speculating about Windows. Both brands are really sliding, still, despite their efforts to turn that around. Now, I'm not saying both--or either one--will go away; Apple itself is proof that a slide can be reversed. But that reversal requires some significant changes in how things are done and take years to become truly felt in the market. Look for either real leadership from the companies' CEOs. RIM may be seeing it with their latest management change. Microsoft I'm not so sure about.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"Yeah, but how easy is it to tweet and load 'Angry Birds'?"

jeb.hoge
jeb.hoge

Well, Android maintains a sync connection with Google as long as the user has it enabled, which is going to be in most instances for almost all users. So it'll go out and check email, contacts, calendaring, etc., and if your users are making changes on the relevant accounts on their computers, then yes, it's going to send that info to the phone. It's what it's designed to do, after all.

Jeep16
Jeep16

You always have to consider what they want to do (same as recommending a computer). Security, just email, reliable phonre - BB Tech and like to tweak - Android Toy - iThingy

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

... have figured out how to answer the phone without entering her password. She uses it all the time for work and complains loudly about the hoops she has to jump through just to access the phone--much less any of the apps on it. That said, she does like the apps available and it does look good (imagery, not form factor) and wishes it were as easy to use as her iPhone.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Yours is the first response I've read that mentions the importance of network accessibility. It doesn't matter what you buy if you can't get the provider's signal in your area. We can't get AT&T in or around where I work. Regarding BB, while I don't use one, I've set up a few dozen at work over the last several years. I've never seen one come out of the box requiring a password to answer a call. That sounds like something the user set up.

chrisbedford
chrisbedford

"Now for any tech-savvy person I whole-heartily recommend the Android. It's just too much fun to mess with" - because you *always have to mess with it* I have had a droid for about 6 months now & I hate it. I *really* *really* wish I had sprung the extra $10 a month and gone for the iPhone, because that's what the Galaxy SII is: a wannabe iPhone. It's slower. MUCH slower. It's more complicated. I can never find the settings I want. It has trouble - no, it *FREAKIN ALWAYS* has trouble connecting to WiFi networks. The desktop software takes FIVE MINUTES just to open, and about another 8 minutes to synchronise. THIRTEEN MINUTES TO GET MY calendar synched! Are you kidding! And in the half year I've had it, I've had to factory-default the phone 4 times to get it to even synch at all, because it would periodically just get stuck partway through the process. Every software upgrade is a *huge* download. Every synch is a *huge* palaver. Oh, and calendar entries made on the phone don't get synched back to Outlook. Anybody worked out I don't like Android? Four years and a couple of phones ago, when I had an STC S710 (Windows 6 or 7 mobile, I don't recall) it used to sync in SECONDS. Make a change in the calendar, wait a little while, see the little wheelie-thing go whirly-whirly, synched. Android? Manual process. Wait 8 minutes. Only works one way. Bah. But I'm on contract, the only way to upgrade is make a huge cash payment and get out of the obligation. Sucks.

JJFitz
JJFitz

Luck you! Your wife's blackberry problem is unique. I have a few suggestions: Try setting "Allow Outgoing Calls while Locked" to Enabled. Yes, I said outgoing. Try not manually locking the phone and call it from another phone. If that works, set your automatic time out lock to a shorter period and don't manually lock the phone. Ask her BES administrator if anyone else is having the problem. Have him check the BES settings under password security. Assuming that you are using an official BB holster, try turning off auto lock when holstered. Also, see what happens when you set auto-answer calls when removing from holster. Check that you have the latest OS for your particular model BB.

JJFitz
JJFitz

If 4G is not widely available in your area, it's pretty much useless on your smartphone and it puts the iPhone in competition with Android. @Palmetto You are correct. BB does not require a password out of the box. Many companies set up a password requirement by BB policy though. That being said, I have never seen a locked BB that required a password to answer a call. I know my BB Storm, Storm 2, Bold, and Curve were all locked by policy but receiving calls did not require a password. I could be wrong but I doubt that option even exists as a user setting. I handed in my last BB at the beginning of the month or I would check it out.

rhonin
rhonin

If you are having these kinds of issues you either have a broken phone or you managed to really screw up the settings. I went from the iPhone4 to SGS2 Skyrocket and don't have any of your issues. My wife went from the iPhone 3GS to the SGS2 and she finds it works faster and much much better (she tried my i4 and didn't care for it). Don't complain, get it fixed.

techrepublic@
techrepublic@

"it *FREAKIN ALWAYS* has trouble connecting to WiFi networks. The desktop software takes FIVE MINUTES just to open, and about another 8 minutes to synchronise. THIRTEEN MINUTES TO GET MY calendar synched! Are you kidding! And in the half year I've had it, I've had to factory-default the phone 4 times to get it to even synch at all, because it would periodically just get stuck partway through the process." Something is wrong with that particular phone. Hardware problem, or maybe software miss configuration, but something is definitely wrong with your phone. I don't personally use a Galaxy SII (except for testing and debugging) but two colleagues do. None have reported any issues with WiFi or syncing and they are very happy with their Galaxy SII, or so they say. From limited personal experience, on this WiFi network the Galaxy SII always connects and connects fast. Oh, and it is also speedy. "Anybody worked out I don't like Android?" I worked out you don't like your phone and you blame it on Android. As it ever occurred to you that you may be blaming the wrong thing. Regards.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

It's still a Hardware Issue and it's the Makers Responsibility to either fix or replace. Don't bother with Call Centres go directly to the Makers Service Agents and ask politely for a solution. If they are unable to provide one go to the Phone's supplier and say you want a replacement either a different Model or Make & Model that actually works. Consumer Protection laws are there for a reason and while I worked as a Companies Service Agent I was always peeved off by the Poor Service that the Customers got till they hit me who fixed their problems. If there is a design Issue with the Phone the Service Agent is the only place to bother with not a Call Centre who most likely is controlled by the Phone Company who supplied the Phone not the Makers Service Agents/Division. [i]I've been responsible for several Model Recalls for things a lot more expensive than a $100.00 to manufacture handsets. The devices that I used to work with where high end cars and there was never an issue with a Model Recall over a Safety/Saleability issue. One report that I wrote for a Coroner ever resulted in Federal Laws changes as no make or model car meet existing Local Laws here. A little thing like the Bonnet being narrower than the Front Windscreen, so in a heavy front end collision the bonnet had the ability to enter the cockpit through the glass killing people. Just look at any car they mostly all still suffer for this issue but their way around it is to reclassify the Front Screen as a Structial Member which in most cases will deflect the Bonnet over the roof. While that is true its not always what happens.[/i] If you still get no satisfaction, then you get the Legal people Involved and start with the Consumer Protection Agencies in your area, but realistically all you want is another handset that works. Col

chrisbedford
chrisbedford

...not WiFi connection, and it's 13 minutes for (a) the software to recognise the handset, and then (b) synchronise. You can't synchronise the Samsung phone using WiFi, unless you use the incredibly (even more) laborious process of three-way synching with Google, and potentially suffer the consequences of having your entire contact list stored on the Evil Empire's servers. And like I said, the WiFi connection is not that much of an issue. I just happened to mention it first because it was top of mind, but what really got my back up in the first place, and put me in such a foul mood over this phone, was the inability to sync my calendar as easily and quickly as a BB or Windows or iPhone does. It's a long-winded palaver, and the calendar sync only works from Outlook to the phone, not in the other direction (which kinda nullifies the point of having a smart phone in the first place, doesn't it).

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

So exactly how many times have you changed the Handset? Resetting a faulty NB to Defaults or reloading Windows doesn't fix a faulty WiFi Device in a NB so why would you think that it would in a Phone? If something doesn't work as you expect it to return it for repairs and be very specific about what you are experiencing. If it doesn't work when it is returned demand a new one to replace the unrepairable one that they supplied you. If the replacement one doesn't work demand a Replacement phone of a different Make Model from your Telco which is whom I presume you got the phone from to begin with. 13 Minutes to get a working WiFi Connection even on the most Secure Network which I very much doubt you have there is not Acceptable and in anyones language points to a device that is Unserviceable and there for unsalable under Consumer Protection Laws. Col

chrisbedford
chrisbedford

That's what I tried telling them - it's the hardware. Not interested. "Reinstall the software, sir". OK, done that, now what? "The developers are working on the issue, sir." Incidentally, the WiFi issue I may have exaggerated a tad - it's not that bad, it does give problems from time to time, but it's unlikely to be the cause of my sync issues since the phone can only be properly synchronised using USB.

Stevadson
Stevadson

The iPhone is the only phone where the manufacturer has total control over the software. (A fluke. Apple insisted, and Cingular was in such bad shape they were forced to agree.) For every other phone, the carrier makes the final determination of what version, features, patches, and mandatory software ships with the phone. And often customized hardware, as well. Lots of bugs, no incentive for the carrier to fix, since it won't make them any more money from you. And don't hold your breath waiting for that upgrade to ICS. You'll need a new phone for that.

techrepublic@
techrepublic@

Seriously, did it not occur to you that the hardware may have problems? Calendar data, whatever the amount and whatever any call centre "techs" say, do not cause WiFi issues but WiFi issues can and very likely will cause syncing problems. Like someone else wrote on another comment, insist on getting the phone fixed (or replaced), especially if it still is on warranty or contract.

ravivarmab
ravivarmab

...what's left to blame? I was using a windows phone for a long time and would never want to change but MS took too long to upgrade themself so I've decided to move to Android. I am using a Galaxy Note and lot of my other friends are using SGSII, all are happy including myself and didn't face any big troubles...I think its either your particular phone or ?

chrisbedford
chrisbedford

I have factory defaulted the phone (4 times, as I mentioned) I have reinstalled the software 3 times I have upgraded the phone's firmware to the latest version ...what's left to blame? It seems (by admission from one of the call centre techs) to have a problem with the volume of my calendar data. Blackberry, iPhone, and Windows phones don't in my experience have any such issue.