Windows

Poll: Will your company eventually migrate to Windows Vista?

Most IT departments have turned a cold shoulder to Windows Vista, but there's a still a question of whether they will eventually migrate to Vista or if they will skip it, stick with Windows XP, and wait to migrate to Windows 7. What will your company do? Take our poll.

Most IT departments have turned a cold shoulder to Windows Vista, but there's a still a question of whether they will eventually migrate to Vista or if they will skip it, stick with Windows XP, and wait to migrate to Windows 7. What will your company do? Take our poll.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

137 comments
rtseno
rtseno

Yes. Vista has its distinct advantages if only users know or taught how to use it well.

PeterM42
PeterM42

Jason Hiner is absolutely right, corporates will NOT want Vista (NT 6.0) as it is bloated, slow and has security and compatibility problems, but they won't like Windows 7 (actually NT 6.1) because it is not much more than a service pack/upgrade to Vista (NT 6.0). Go to Windows Explorer > Help > About to check the version number!

bsalivin
bsalivin

We are fed up with the shenanigans over every recent release. Actively evaluating Linux as a strategic replacement.

blackfoot001
blackfoot001

No. We will stay with XP as long as we can. We would have to replace too much equipment if we went to Vista.

bwoolley
bwoolley

Not likely, far too many compatibility issues

brianpeterson
brianpeterson

I purchased my laptop with an upgrade path to Vista. Ran XP Pro until my hard drive died,then on a installed Vista on new drive as OEM could not supply an XP Pro discs for 2 weeks! Thank you HP! After using Vista business, it is much better and not slower on my machine. The only thing surprising to me it is no more stable than XP Pro even though it was clean installation. But functioning is superior to XP and reminds one how dated XP has become.

rich3page
rich3page

I don't care - I threw in the towel on my IT job at a bank after spending a couple weeks evaluating a Vista computer. Absolutely none of the banking software used at our institution worked on the platform. I left that job about a year ago - as of that time, there was still some software the vendors still had not figured out how to work properly on the "new" XP platform unless the user is logged in as an administrator to the computer. I decided to let younger blood go through that platform migration. Frankly, I don't like the role of QC for all these software developers who are unable to figure out how to program for Microsoft which also is unable to design and program with an operating system. I do have a Vista Home Premium based computer at home. My experience with that is very positive (except for the frequent prompts for permission to continue). Vista in the home environment seems to be at least as stable as XP was at the same time after release. Yes, there is the problem of hardware incompatibility -- manufacturers have no incentive to provide drivers for a new platform on products developed for a previous operating system.

sunnykaymaheo@hotmail.com
sunnykaymaheo@hotmail.com

Not likely. (Since we make the decisions!) Your article said it all. Vista is a beauty until it opens its mouth. It simply does not work. Many things taken for granted in XP is an ordeal in vista. Like the Chinese are said to have said over the Aussi satellite they launched, 'we don't know!'. Things do get installed and poof!: I don't know where it is! ArchiCAD for instance shows up the 2D but the 3D does not! And for those still for XP? Yes, yes, yes.

spanishetc
spanishetc

NO. I think that I will upgrade to a different OS whenever I feel enticed, lured, or attracted by it in some way, like the way I was lured by XP many years ago. That is why I never used ME in the first place. Upgrading to Vista would mean to upgrade software and that does not make any sense money wise. On the other hand, if I had to upgrade most of my software for other reasons, I would consider upgrading to Vista since its likely that any new versions of my software will support Vista. But, it is more likely that the new Windows will be out by then so..... Hasta la vista Windows Vista!

compugal
compugal

no way we will move to VISTA

kevin
kevin

Not on your nelly, Nelly. Vista is sloooooooooow and simply not worth the effort of upgrading. XP is rock solid and does all I need it to do.

slewis01
slewis01

Not a chance, after testing in our networked environment, the helpdesk tickets ratio of 70% vista calls 15% XP issues and 15% others. Needless to say, we have removed all Vista boxes from the company. The cost support outwayed the cost of reverting back.

butkus
butkus

My small public school and most of the ones in NJ I know of, won't move to Vista. We have too many old progams that still work with Win98, but not Vista. Programming a new code won't happen with most public school software programs, no enougth user base. Plus with the crummy network speed, most files are off the network. I have Vista Business at home and don't mine it. But still, file access when pulling up a directory is a crawl, even with the patch and another Vista tweek installed.

jurgen.manycolored
jurgen.manycolored

No. We use XP with a Debian server environment. If I had my choice, I wouldn't use XP either, and migrate to Linux. But reality of market size forces us to run XP.

ross00
ross00

No way. Testing on a Vista-equipped PC among our IT and Call Centre staff turned out a lemon. Continual reports of 'It's too hard to get into', 'It's too slow to react' and, ' Can I get back on my XP, boss?' reached epidemic proportions. Our IT people complained that the programmes we'd had written for our business failed to run correctly in Vista and existing mainstream software had plenty of hiccups too. Even our some of our printers and scanners are incompatible. Vista? Thanks Microsoft but common sense and my chequebook tell me to pass this time. XP plus McAfee has been a winning combination for us over several years so why change?

jdieter
jdieter

The new way to work, is to have a virtual machine at the office with ALL the apps you use installed on it. Then use any type of machine anywhere (Ubuntu linux, or a Mac, or win 98, or win XP or...) to RDP to your virtual machine. How many times has your pc gone whacky, and you had to reinstall everything? If you use a virtual machine, you have no problem, you restore 2 files. I even use a tiny $299 asus as a terminal sometimes.

andybudd
andybudd

We have already migrated to Vista and we love it. Buddsradios.

Pyrotech_z
Pyrotech_z

SP1 fixed all the major problems, and I still hear the whiners complaining. Of course whiners always find something to complain about. Windows 7 will have whiners too.

bonbon
bonbon

Vista is far too slow and clumsey - windows has gone backwards and made the usual commercial-world error...they have "improved" a product beyond useful parameters.

lheiges
lheiges

Smaller businesses rely on outside accounting packages to function. Some of these have just gotten to the point of requiring XP in the last couple of years. Until the third party packages catch up, there will be no Vista. If there is ONE key program in an office that has a problem with Vista, there will be no Vista. If we had stayed with a Windows 3.1 style of programming, we would be closer to a universal Vista migration capability.

hfufna
hfufna

No way. I bought two different PCs to test (one HP Pavillion Dual Pro 2 4GB etc) and a Siemens Scaleo-J Athlon 1600+). The laptop is unacceptably slow. We spent 10 days installing and reinstalling different Vista versions and tryn' the impossible only to finally give up. Too complicated, too slow and - furthermore - doesn't work well with our existing printers, scanners and even network configuration. The desktop AMD was clearly faster, even with single-core CPU and only 1GB ram, but still unacceptable. We can't supply to our users brand new PCs way slower than the older one they ask to replace. Not to mention the need to literally dismantle all the new features of Vista (ACL, Aero, background indexing and so on) only to make it run smoothly. On both PCs the hard disk led was flashing ALL the time ALL day long. Compared to XP the Vista SP1 is a resource eater, and an hardware teaser: this sounds to us like sound searching for troubles. Something we already have plenty of.

tvmuzik
tvmuzik

Abso...friggin...lutely...N O T.

biggin'
biggin'

Not no way, not no how. There are enough user issues in my offfice with XP to keep me hopping. The thought of re-training our office staff to use an inferior OS is enough to keep me away.

HiTekGadgets
HiTekGadgets

TO put it mildly.. hell no!! I have worked on enough vista machines of various makes and hardware configs. I Also welcomed it with open arms.. until I started really having to use it.. Despite a horrific learning curve of things that just dont make any more common sense, its slow.. even on machines with virtual steroids, its buggy.. to a point that makes me want to start an anti vista campaign and frankly its super annoying with overly tightened security to the point where getting anything done creeps to a halt often. And lets face it.. how long till another back door is found by a hacker anyway. If it aint broke, dont fix it.. XP was great, even with its few occasional bugs. Oh yes, one more thing.. if I wanted a mac style OS... I would just go buy a mac.

smunie
smunie

I would sooner migrate to Linux or even Win2K. The OS continues to get more bloated, the applications continue to get more bloated, and business pressures force us to do more with less people. Our systems need to get faster, not slower.

j0hndrew
j0hndrew

My laptop came with vista and i wish it had not. all specialised software that i use is not supported in vista!! options are is it easier to make do with the specialised software being unstable or do i "downgrade" (is XP a downgrade??!!) and have the problem of finding XP drivers for my laptop?? tough choice

hnmcc
hnmcc

XP Pro SP3 does the job well, on computers that would not be able to run Vista without a lot of coughing and spluttering. We already run OpenOffice, Firefox, and a LAMP CRM system. Our favoured position is to continue with XP Pro: but if MS forces us to change, we'll migrate to Linux (probably Ubuntu, which we're testing now).

L8erG8er
L8erG8er

No, we will not migrate to Vista. We are a telecommunications company, and it took us a lot of work to get some of our vendor apps to run under XP/2000. It appears that many of our vendor apps will simply not run on Vista, and we don't have time to adapt it, and the vendors have no intention of changing anything either.

carlsf
carlsf

COST of the product 15 systems (Ultimate)is outside what I would consider reasonable price. Cost of upgrading the HW and Pherpherals NZ$1200.00 per system not including Application upgrades is outside what I would consider reasonable price. I have just purchased a New PC Minit Tower Custom built very high specs and I have purchased VISTA Ultimate 64bit for my personal use. Sorry MS you have blowen it as far as the my business is concerned 15 units and my clients 75 units.

stenman
stenman

No it will not. We are using only Linux for servers and going to Macs running OS X for clients machines. TCO is the driving force with user productivity a close second reason to get off the Microsoft bandwagon.

jhasprey
jhasprey

My company has had Vista Premium running for some months now and I must say it far out performs my XP machines. I was most skeptical about Vista right from the time it was first mentioned and heard nothing but horror stories of it. My new AMD Phenom X3 64 is super fast and have not as yet had a single problem. What most people don't realize is that "You have got to learn how to use it". If I had more than 2 thumbs they would all be up.

brad
brad

our company is migrating to apple - the biggest problem was migrating off MS exchange and onto open source versions. The migration so far has reduced problems to where they are 25% or less of where they used to be.

jim
jim

I wanted to migrate our office to Vista. I bought a test computer with Vista for my home use and later a laptop with Vista. I endured initial incompatibility issues, unexpected shutdowns, freezes, slow loading and more for months, thinking MS would eventually resolve these problems. I give up. I don't want to switch to Mac so I am just another frustrated XP user waiting for life after Vista.

frabjous
frabjous

I'm not an IT decision maker, but I would not expect my employer to ever migrate our 120,000 work stations/laptops to Vista. By far, our computers are used to run rather complex proprietary software that doesn't use much Windows power or features anyway. Even our newest systems in the field (at least 90% of total) have minimal CPUs and 1GB RAM or less--I don't see the beancounters, who have great power, ever paying for the hardware to support Vista when we don't need anything more than our "universal" XP. At some point, probably in the Windows 7 timeframe, when XP is really facing loss of support, and if MS brings out Win7 such that it could run on roughly the same old hardware, then I would expect a fairly rapid migration to Win7. Or they might go Linux--free sounds good to the kind of ultra-cost conscious folks that run our corporation, and they might replace the Windows-dependent support people for Linux skills.

Asiafish
Asiafish

I tried Vista on two of my business machines, and in the end moved my entire office to Apple's Leopard.

jetpowercom
jetpowercom

Nope. XP stays until something simpler, less unstable, faster, more intuitive and better conceived comes along - or until Management buys into the MacIntel model.

daeg_ltl
daeg_ltl

With over 1400 systems, AD domain structure at 24 sites, and AD policy managing the desktop and software deployment, our IT department has no plans of making any migration from XP until compelled (or forced) to. We already have licensing in place to use VISTA where we decide to, but years of developing a stable platform through desktop policies, login scripts, software deployment and backup services dialed in, we're going to be riding this platform of stability in supporting staff in productivity for as long as possible. It is far more likely that in time the need to move to a different platform will come, and it seems would fit the timeline to simply move to the next system after Vista. There will be some exceptions in the way of laptops that are released with Vista only. Which I've seen with several models of laptops from Toshiba and Fujitsu, where drivers for XP simply do not exist and downgrading the OS to fit our IT infrustructure isn't a good choice. In an Active Directory domain, there are in fact some compelling reasons to dig into the Vista OS and discover its hidden secrets, not to make use of them, but to keep them out of your domain. Share browsing capabilities used to make sharing easier to manage for the home user subjugate hidden shares and the like in Active Directory. Updates to server 2003 with the 2007/08 policies management allows IT to incorporate the new policy management as a jump point to migrating to Server 2008. However, these policies will used more towards containing Vista into the same set of user rights that are currently enjoyed by XP users. So again, more like shoring up against Vista related security risks from the desktop, not to use those features for enhancing the end user experience. In fact one of the more significant features introduced to the consumer OS is the use of kerberos security in Vista, which in an Active Directory domain the kerberos security is handled by the Domain Controller server, which essentially takes over the kerberos in the local system. This works the same for XP desktops as well as Vista, with exception to certain sets of local security policies. So the benefit of the added security features in Vista don't benefit IT departments under Active Directory domain infrustructure. Its merely added bloat with no real use or motivation to start installing Vista onto desktops, other than to test how it reacts to your current environment and how to secure against any threats of Vista portables plugging into your network and having a look around. But that's my ten cents.

bmeacham98
bmeacham98

All new machines issued to employees have Windows Vista installed. As old machines reach end of life, they will be replaced with new ones running whatever Microsoft is offering at the time. Of course, the fact that we sell computers might have something to do with it.

Brendan P
Brendan P

I will avoid migration as long a practical. The greatest reason is "bloat." Skip the "experience", I want my PCs to work.

glucignani
glucignani

The huge cost to migrate to Vista, or to a fully new operating system on a medium or large scale company with no a "real" value added, it is not worthwile. Most of the users does not really use XP, they use application well within limits of abitude more than learning what an application can really do; if the system does not boot they are simply stuck. Moreover any change on the interface, also if it is done in goodfaith, confuse them and IT peoples are flooded of call on "how I can do my job done now". Very few peoples may manage an operating system and take out benefits, but not from annoying alerts for beginners. In a more complicate environment, as i.e. running not simple flat office application, but 3d cad an engineering software most of those application are not compliant and refuse to work with Vista, they work absolutely fine with XP. XP has represented, like Office (but still 207 is a question mark), a common background for all peples operating in a globalized world sharing files and applications. Vista definitely break this peaceful period, not giving anythyng else than a different GUI, slower, but overboosted and more expensive and power consuming machines, why we must go for that bloody OS ? IT peoples, with Vista should learn most from scratch in a time consuming activity to search relocated functions that does not pay. I share in full the content of the article: give us XP improvements, patches, service pack in a progressive improvements, with some backward levels of compatibility, and we are open to follow the rule to pay for any of it.

jdclyde
jdclyde

just to be able to say we have the "latest/greatest". Not having a version that will run on a midgrade computer was poor planning. 2 gigs of ram to have a word processor? Yeah, right.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

That the 64 Bit Version of 7 is the most popular migration from XP for business. With todays release of 7, Vista is effectively finished and if you look at the price lists from my main suppliers they list 0 available copies of any Vista product being available and copies of both XP in all versions and 7 ready for immediate delivery. The question I have is who in their right mind would migrate to Vista in the next few months with 7 being Released and it being accepted as a Refined/Evolved version of Vista? Personally I think that Vista is all but dead and buried to the Business Market and those who waited will reap the benefits of not going through the pain and expense of using Vista. Most of the Hardware that couldn't run with Vista is now at or very close to the end of it's life from a Tax Point of View so there is nothing holding back the Deployment of M$ latest offering. ;) Col

compugal
compugal

We are very pleased with windows XP and see no need to change the OS of our PC.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

OK so by now the Hardware isn't such an issue as just about everything but the High End Photocopiers come network Printers will be Vista Computable but what about those Specialized Applications that most business use that have not as yet been rewritten for Vista. Just how do you get them to work for you or have you stopped using them? That is the Big Thing that is preventing Migration to Vista the lack of Software compatibility. But I suppose if you don't use any propriety Software that wasn't supplied with the computer you will not have a problem with Vista. Things only start to get nasty when you want to use things that are Mission Critical to the Business and can not be replaced. That is the biggest problem with Vista and XP as well I might add. Col

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

It saves us heaps of money to get others to work the bugs out first. :D The reality however is that Vista is a OS it is supposed to allow programs to run on it. It isn't the be all and end all of the computer world and if it rails to allow business to run Mission V+Critical Applications or use Hardware then it's not suitable for that place but if it allows the business to run what is required it's fine to use. Attempting to force people to use something you find useful isn't a good idea however as they will come complaining to you when it fails to do what they require. Col

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