iPhone

Poll: Would you choose the iPhone or the Storm as your primary smartphone?

Apple is trying to bring the iPhone to the enterprise, while RIM is trying to produce an iPhone-like device to run on its enterprise-ready smartphone platform. If you had the choice between these two touchscreen devices, which would you pick? Take our poll.

Apple is trying to bring the iPhone to the enterprise, while RIM is trying to produce an iPhone-like device to run on its enterprise-ready smartphone platform. If you had the choice between these two touchscreen devices, which would you pick? Take our poll.

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About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

34 comments
bernalillo
bernalillo

In the work environment I find it more desirable to read and edit attachements than hdtv entertainment. I like the apple human interface but want to apply it to work tools not PDA envy.

KCSteve
KCSteve

For me, the clear choice is the Storm 2 (with several improvements from the original) over the iPhone. As my Apple PC tech as work tells me, 'The iPhone is a telephone with SOME business applications, whereas the BlackBerry is a business device with a telephone built in.' I like the security features of the BES. I like the fact that my e-mails, calendars, tasks and memos are secure on the BlackBerry. I like the fact I can replace my BlackBerry's battery on MY terms, not Apple's. I like the fact I can legally teather my Blackberry to a laptop if needed. I LOVE the fact the monthly rate is cheaper on the BlackBerry than the iPhone. I could go on, but I think I've made my point.

MACPCAssist
MACPCAssist

I bought the Storm Saturday. I went to return it today. I have had a 7100t about three years ago, and if it was a touch screen I would still be using it today. Problems in order: 1) Serious lag between portrait and landscape - sometimes greater than 10 seconds. 2) Editing text in a field is impossible unless your fingers are heated stylus points and see-through. If you try to edit in a text field, like in the crappy browser, if you follow directions, the highlight turns into a box. Now you are supposed to swipe left to move it. Instead, the entire field goes left. 3) Click on a page or interaction button on a page to accept or do somthing and it regularly zooms in instead. 4) It can take up to 15 presses on the screen before the snooze button even thinks that it is being pressed. 5) The least intuitive phone I have ever tried, and I though that Windows Mobile was bad. Try finding bluetooth if you are new to the Blackberry's. In setup, there is a bluetooth routine, but instead of guiding you to the way to turn it on, it just tells you that it is disabled. It took me a bit before I finally pressed one of the real buttons on the phone to get the menu that had the "turn bluetooth on" portion. 6) Entering text is absolutely difficult. The accuracy of the screen is about where a BETA test unit would be. I press on one key and get something else, only having to start the whole dang routine over to get what I need. How wasteful is that? 7) Try finding the "-" in portrait and then in landscape modes. In one mode it is on the Numeric and the other it is on Symbol. this kind of inconsistencies tells me that they have not really field tested the unit. This applies to many of the other common symbols. 8) There are no direction keys where you need it most: editing text. They do show up in going up and down the list of emails. 9) No flash. 10) No pdf viewer. 11) Random duplicates after using the wizard to move data from my Mogul. 12) Fatal Error when using the website (RIM's) to update and check for new software. Without Fail. 13) Bluetooth stack is poor when connected to a Jawbone that works perfectly fine with three other phones. Lots of static. 14) Even when the power is off, the phone will beep if accidentally pressed. I tried keeping the settings on for the beep so I would have audible confirmation when pressing the whacko screen. 15) Phone is unusable when connected to the computer. 16) Total inconsistencies with software. In one application, the accept key is buried in the menu key versus having to scroll 10 times to get to the bottom where the accept key usually is. 17) POSITIVE: The Blackberry syncing is far superior to Activesync, which never fails to produce error messages that only someone in another parallel dimension could figure out how to solve. 18) It was a great education on what happens when you rush something out the door. 19) Some of this stuff will be natural to regular users of the Blackberrys. But how would you market this to a non-initated market share to compete with an iPhone? 20) Even with the poor backbone of Sprint, my mogul is easier and more intuitive to use. 21) If you lay it flat, it gets confused as to whether or not it shold be portrait or landscape. Crappy if you hate waiting twenty seconds for it to decide. 22) buttons dissappear when pressing and go blank...

zclayton2
zclayton2

No WiFi? Please. I'm getting a Curve because of that. Everything else looks good - though not good enough to offset no WiFi. If that doesn't change quickly look for the Storm on the carosel of misfit phones as you walk in the Verizon store door.

bill-e-goat
bill-e-goat

WTF? No WIFI on the Storm?? Until Blackberry gets a clue, will stick with the iPhone.

john.hamilton
john.hamilton

Some BB handsets have WiFi, so why it is missing off the Storm is odd. Even if only to disable the feature (for security) it is always nice to have a choice of connectivity options available. However with vast 3/3.5G coverage and fixed cost tariffs the only 'neeed' for WiFi may be at home or in an office where there is no 3G.

elandwehr
elandwehr

We have been waiting for the STORM for some time. I guess this phone just lost to Apple. It would have been nice to get access to local resources via WiFi like the iPhone does. We have local apps that we would love to get to without going out to the internet to get inside to get at the apps... I guess iPhone won.....

jeremyh
jeremyh

The Storm was built with no wifi per VZW's specifications. If you can't force your customers to buy a data plan like Apple does you just don't include the option (wifi) in the phone. This makes customers purchase the data option which builds more revenue for VZW. I think in the long run this will hurt the sales of the phone for non-business tech savvy consumers.

viruser
viruser

This is one of the reasons I backed out of buying the Blackberry Storm. Verizon nevertheless refuses to sell any backberry without a data plan so I don't get why they asked to block the WiFi capablitity.

a.southern
a.southern

Blackberry or Apple? Pies or Phones? the lack of (I'm told) WiFi on the Storm means I vote for iPhone, despite me not particularly liking it. I have used one once and it's the giddy feeling of that really fit girl in your sixthform giving you attention, though you know it's just after your money. (What kind of school did I go to?????) I hate the way iPods and iPhone tries to tie you into O2 and iTunes. Blackberry have done well to find a GPRS or 3G chip that doesn't have built in WiFi functionality. Most have it. and for that price, I'd expect it. Storm is "Me Too" design work, but I'd need more than brand loyality and competitor hating to convince me WiFi is worth the sacrifices. WiFi please, then, not only would I vote for Storm instead of iPhone, I'd buy it.

shamimph
shamimph

without WiFi BB no way , i will go with iPhone

cupcake
cupcake

And personally, I would choose the iPhone for work if they let me. Unfortunately, the BB has been the standard for the company for sometime and I don't see them changing without a really strong reason. Once entrenched into a product line (like the landline phone system or their choice of computers), its hard to get a company to change.

lpurcell
lpurcell

Neither, I would choose something more windows based like a motorola Q or UTStar phone. I feel the Iphone and The Storm are over priced, for someone who wants the "in" thing, and really do not add that much functionality. I like my PPC-6700 because I can edit and view .pdfs , documents, and spreadsheets while on the go. Also send emails +plus it acutally works.- oh and you can have pictures too. go figure

.Martin.
.Martin.

but if it were one or the other I would go for the BlackBerry. honestly, the iPhone is not a PDA, it is just an ipod with a SIM card. if I had the choice i would go with something from Samsung or HTC.

a.southern
a.southern

After the experience I've had with a re-badged HTC (SPV3100) I'm steering clear in future. Crashes WAY too many times.

MACPCAssist
MACPCAssist

I have had a lot of issues with Sprint and their iteration of the Mogul. If you get to sprintmogul.net there are a few trick for the phone there. but I hate defective phones too.

david
david

Neither, I have just picked up an HTC Touch HD and it is beter than both in almost every area.

confirm
confirm

I would never choose a Blackberry for my users because the thing is much harder to use than an iPhone. I don't understand this 'business-ready' thing. Every time I hear this about anything it usually means a) hard to use for everyone but the IT staff; b) lots of paper work; c) money in some executive's pocket. 'Business-ready' often points to bloat and unnecessary complications that actually made the business harder and more expensive to run. You can get multiple-account email on the iPhone; you can get multiple calendars on the iPhone. You can view docs. OK - so you can't edit a word document on the iPhone but come on - do you want to edit that on a Blackberry. Use a laptop like normal people.

john.hamilton
john.hamilton

Having multiple-account email access to web based email accounts is fine, but most companies don't expose their email servers to the Internet except to send/receive emails. Any solution allowing smartphones/laptop/PCs to access coporate email from the Internet needs to be very carefully considered. Putting a BES server inside the company provides a very easy and very secure way to provide BB handsets (users) with secure email, calendat, taks.contatc etc. as well as secure access to the companys' Intranet services and Internet. It may take a bit effort setting up, but configuring remote devices remotely with a company policy is simple, and from a users' perspective ...the BB simply works!

Forum Surfer
Forum Surfer

I've worked with many organizations that decided to forego webmail access. In these cases a BES server is very helpful. Even with webmail, BES allows you greater security standards...like the ability to force the user to enter their password to check their mail. That a huge pet peeve of mine. How secure is it to have someone runing around with a phone that has all their passwords saved? Next thing you know, Billy Bob in accounting has his stolen and security is compromised.

todd.ross
todd.ross

The ability to use readily available and cheap Wi-Fi vs. very expensive 3G is a strong argument in the iPhone's favour, at least in Canada. For a small organization, iPhone could make sense.

john.hamilton
john.hamilton

The data sent from the BES to the end devices is small an easily fit in a low cost bundle/tariff. Thankfully most carriers (in UK) will give unlimited 3G (subject to fair use) for a few ?'s (UKP) While WiFi has advantages - their short distance means you must be close and near stationary. 3G provide a mobile coverage. To get access to most WiFi you need to pay, and to get access to different supplier's WiFi usually means paying a 3rd party (e.g. iPass ?). Using free hotspots for some personal use is maybe fine, but even using HTTPS over an unknown hotspot can easily compromise you data (man in middle attack). Business and confidential data/connections should always be established over secure connections via a trusted provider. BB encrypts data from server to device, and web browising should be via the companies BES server to enforce company policy on accessing external web services.

anthony.kelly
anthony.kelly

As an IT Manager when making the decision on what our Smartphone range will be it would never occur to me to choose an iPhone. When I'm thinking of the business world in this context Apple just doesn't figure. Although I would have some issues with Blackberry devices I do consider their smartphones to be business suitable. Howevr with Windows Mobile Connect there is now a vast range of devices to choose from. So perhaps the question should be whether I'd choose either device as our base model or would I be more likely to choose a Nokia, Palm, Sony Ericsson, Samsung etc. I don't beleive that either the Blackberry or the iPhone will 'corner the market' when it comes to companies choosing a device to connect to their email systems etc.

markinct
markinct

I know the Android platform is new, and the there is only the less than perfect G1 - but I have found it to be stable and fun to use. Once Android can sync with Exchange I think it will be a serious contender. The only thing the Storm has that I wish my G1 has is a 3.5mm jack.

Kruppster
Kruppster

Since I was already an ATT customer I didn't have to change plans to get the Iphone and being in tech support the ability to use VNC to log in to one of my servers where I can then use any program like Logmein or crossloop makes the Iphone my emergency platform for immediate access no matter where I am. I was looking at mini notebooks until this came out

LarryD4
LarryD4

I have had Cingular's 8125 for over two years now and I love the thing. Its a bit heavier than the norm but the abilities it has is what I love. I'll be upgrading to AT&T's new version called the Tilt real soon.

robo_dev
robo_dev

That's what I'm looking at...

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