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Safari 4: The new default browser for Web developers?

Most Web developers use Firefox for building pages, but ZDNet's Andrew Mager says Safari 4 could become the new default browsers for Web coders. Learn why.

It's a regular frustration to me that Web developers so rarely test their code in Internet Explorer. That's because Firefox is far and away the most popular browser that developers use, and has been for years.

So I was surprised when I read that my colleague Andrew Mager -- a Web developer here at CBS Interactive who also writes for TechRepublic's sister site ZDNet -- was debating whether Apple's Safari 4 could become the new standard for Web coders.

Apple just released the first public beta of Safari 4 today, touting it as the "world's fastest Web browser." After using it all day as his Web development browser, Mager argues three reasons why Safari 4 is actually

  1. It is the first browser to pass the Acid3 test.
  2. Its on-board Web console offers improvements over Firebug.
  3. It shows breakdown of all the resources that it takes for a page to load.

Read Mager's full article and check out his visuals of Safari 4.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

11 comments
Sraggle
Sraggle

Safari $ Beta is Nice, Fast, and Clean. But, cannot be used as system default browser in Windows XP and MOffice programs. Unless there is something they are hiding?

ScarF
ScarF

I don't think so. BTW. Is Magger's article a friendly shoulder for Apple's Safari?

danap
danap

Don't know why it's a frustration to you when developers rarely use IE. I always recommend to students to "develop against a mozilla browser like Firefox and do some final testing in IE". IE is notorious for covering up code mistakes. Also, I'm tired of sites that only work in IE because that's all the developer used. I say hooray for Safari. It's a good, solid browser. Developers should be in the habit of using as many browsers as possible.

ScarF
ScarF

On one hand is Jason's frustration seeing too many developers testing on Firefox. Than, I find Dana's frustrations because - even so, there are too many developers testing on IE only. Than, I find something that frustrates me: "developers should use as many browsers as possible". I still hope that one day we will live in that ideal world where will be a single standard for all the browsers. And, they will differ by tools, speed, interface etc. but the code they understand.

markku.niskanen
markku.niskanen

Three hours ago I finished a major rebuild of an ancient templating system we wrote hastily (and sluggishly) about five years ago. We needed to move the templates to XHTML and the starting point was that Firefox would render it almost perfectly and IE display was totally broken. Well, the funny thing was that even though some of the HTML errors were severe ones it was Firefox that was the forgiving part. IE needed more errors to be corrected before displaying the pages correctly. Anyhow, when I got green light from W3C validator the pages finally displayed identically.

Sterling chip Camden
Sterling chip Camden

My experience is that it usually requires a complete re-engineering of my approach to the problem in order to work at all. Lately I've just been saying "screw IE" and advising users "best viewed with anything except Internet Explorer".

chris
chris

when all your customers use to view "their" website is IE :-/ I am glad that it's now a neck and neck battle in terms of saturation though.

poetryb
poetryb

I know Opera 10 is only only a alpha release, but it passed acid 3 test a while back now. And for an alpha release it is stable, It is my default web browser, and for web development, though I do test the work in IE. Chrome and firefox.

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