Windows

Sanity check: Five things Microsoft has to do for Windows 7 to succeed

A lot of businesses have already decided to boycott Windows Vista and many consumers would like to skip it, too. In order to avoid the same mistakes in the next version of the operating system, there are five things Microsoft needs to do with Windows 7.

A lot of businesses have already decided to boycott Windows Vista and many consumers would like to skip it, too. In order to avoid the same mistakes in the next version of the operating system, there are five things Microsoft needs to do with Windows 7.

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We're going to be hearing a lot about Windows 7 over the next two weeks as Microsoft convenes its Professional Developers Conference (PDC) and the Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) -- both in Los Angeles.

I recently discussed the five reasons why Windows Vista failed, and although Microsoft may continue to defend Vista as Steve Ballmer did at the Gartner Symposium on October 16, make no mistake that the company has already moved past Vista -- psychologically and strategically.

Ballmer and company know that Vista has been rejected by businesses and that it has dreadful reputation among the general public. They know they screwed up. And Microsoft is nothing if not responsive to customers and public opinion. In fact, I've argued before that the company is actually hyper-responsive and that's why they've crammed way too many features and way too much code into both Windows and Microsoft Office.

So how can Microsoft recover from the Vista debacle and breath life back into Windows? If nothing else, here are five things the company needs to do to start.

5. Speed it up significantly

One of the worst qualities of Windows Vista is that it is almost always slower than its predecessor Windows XP when running on the same hardware. And most of that performance drag is not simply due to the fancy graphics. Even if you turn off the Aero interface, Vista is still usually slower.

The problem is that the underlying Windows code is way too bloated -- over 50 million lines of code in Vista -- and even today's ultra-fast multi-core processors can't overcome that. The Windows development team has to find a way to streamline Windows 7 so that it's faster and more stable than both XP and Vista, whether it's running on netbooks and nettops with the Atom processor and only 1 GB of RAM or tomorrow's 8-core machines with 10 GB of RAM.

That's an extremely difficult task, but no one said this was going to be simple or easy. One way to start is by turning Windows into just the core OS and further modulizing it by making a lot of the other software such as the Media Center, Tablet PC, and Admin Tools available as downloadable add-ons.

4. Avoid compatibility problems

In the process of streamlining Windows 7, the developers can't sacrifice software compatibility. One of the things that has killed Vista is that Microsoft spent so much effort trying making it more secure with User Access Control (UAC) that it broke a lot of software in the process.

You can argue that a lot of the stuff that broke in Windows Vista was poorly programmed to begin with and deserved to break so that it could be rewritten more securely. The problem is that not much of the software has been rewritten and the UAC approach has not worked because users get so many dialog boxes that they just blindly click OK until all of them go away. A better approach is needed -- one that balances security and compatibility.

The other compatibility issue that Windows 7 has to juggle is the 32-bit vs. 64-bit split. While most modern processors are 64-bit, most of the software and device drivers are still written in 32-bit code. I've seen a number of PCs with 64-bit CPUs that have 32-bit Windows installed simply because it has better compatibility. I've also seen and heard about a number of business systems that have 64-bit Windows Vista installed, but are running into significant software and/or driver incompatibility problems.

Microsoft, Intel, and AMD need to lead the charge to get software vendors on-board with 64-bit before Windows 7 is officially released.

3. Undercut OS X on price

Mac sales have been growing much faster than the overall PC market and Mac OS X has continued to nibble away at Windows' massive market share over the past two years. However, Apple showed the same chink in its armor that has long plagued it when it recently announced its new line of laptops and the cheapest one was priced at $999. The message being sent is that Apple wants to be a premium computer brand with high margins and has very little interest in selling low-margin, high-volume machines.

Over the next two to three years the lion's share of the growth in computer sales is very likely going to be in the sub-$500 netbook and nettop market. These machines are essentially just glorified Web browsers in a diminuitive hardware package. The OS doesn't matter much. As a result, Linux is a major threat to become the OS powering a lot of these machines, because of its minimal price.

However, with Apple relegating itself to the high end of the market and most users still not very comfortable with Linux, Microsoft has the opportunity to swoop in and deliver a Windows 7 that is fast and cheap and can run very well on these little machines, while also scaling all the way up to the fastest workstations. A lot of users and businesses would probably gravitate toward the idea of a common OS experience (and one that most users already know) in Windows, especially if the price is comparable between Linux and Windows machines.

The key here is making Windows very inexpensive and very scalable while preparing to sell it in larger volumes than ever before on the cheap machines that are going to flood the market over the next couple years.

2. Sell only one version

There were primarily two editions of Windows XP: Home and Professional. With Windows Vista, that doubled to four primary editions: Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate. It's time to simplify and go back to just one version of Windows with one price.

This is a case of Microsoft just getting out of the way and letting Windows be Windows. Having just one edition of the client OS will make Windows 7 easier to understand, easier to purchase, and easier to support (for both Microsoft and IT departments).

Of course, the one version of Windows 7 needs to be cheaper than Mac OS X ($99), easier to use than Linux, and easier to set up and get started than any of the recent versions of Windows.

1.  Make it the last shrink-wrapped OS

The old way of building and packaging operating systems in shrink-wrapped boxes that are released every few years is just not fast enough or nimble enough to meet the demands to today's Internet-driven computing environment. It's also counterproductive for an OS maker because you end up competing against yourself the way XP and Vista are now competing against each other.

There's only one Windows, and it has merely evolved over time. That's the message Microsoft needs to drive home by making Windows 7 the last shrink-wrapped version of the OS. From here on out, Microsoft should simply make Windows a constantly evolving platform with new features and functionality enhancements added several times a year through Windows Update.

The business model would be to turn this into a subscription product, albeit a very inexpensive one. As long as you have a current Windows subscription then you can continue to download new features, patches, and updates. If your subscription lapses then Windows still works but you can no longer download the new stuff, or any add-ons, and you can only download highly critical security patches.

For enterprises that are currently using Software Assurance, they are already buying Windows as part of a subscription so there would be no change in the business model for them.  For consumers and small businesses who aren't part of Software Assurance and typically buy Windows from OEMs such as Dell, Toshiba,  and Hewlett-Packard, the Windows license that comes with their PC could last for three years and then it's up to the buyer to pay something like $30-$40/year to renew. For those who want to build their own system, a full version of the OS could cost something like $50-$75 for the first year.

Bottom line

Windows 7 needs to be fast, inexpensive, and widely compatible. Microsoft also needs to change the development and business models to make Windows one continually evolving OS.

Let's face it, the OS is not as flashy as it once was. It's also not nearly as relevant as it was a decade ago. The Web browser is gradually usurping its position as the most important application platform, as has long been predicted.

Because of that, Windows is at a crossroads where it could begin losing large chunks of market share to competitors that are better prepared to operate in this new reality, or it can greatly simplify its OS while turning into more of a background utility that makes good money off of a low-margin, high-volume business.

If it can pull that off and clearly communicate to businesses and consumers that Windows 7 is the start of a new approach to Windows then Windows 7 could be a watershed release. If Microsoft simply releases a mild revision to Vista and maintains the same development and business models, then Windows could become more vulnerable to its competitors than it's been in almost two decades.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

443 comments
saved2serve
saved2serve

Suggestions for Windows 7. Mostly for navigation and speed. I now run Vista HB, dual booting with XP 1. Change the default folder view to Details, and allow one to set what one chooses under that to every kind of folder (i have hundreds, and know "apply to all.." is spssd to do it. Fixes for this do not stay - Google for threads). 2. Fix the problem with Vista not remembering Windows sizes (again, Google for problems with fixes) 3. Put the Up arrow back. It is often faster even after one learns the breadcrumb menu, and is needed when using folders without the navigation pane, which is helpful to eliminate due to Vista not rembering folder sizes. See free QTTab bar for this and more options worth incorporating. 4. Allow moving of Task Bar buttons, and choosing different colors, as well as saving sessions, just like Firefox allows for tabs (Colorful Tabs extension for the color). Then copy more things from FF for IE. Or retire it. (doing research, I usually run 2 instances of FF concurrently, one of Sea Monkey and 1 of others if needed, and find IE the least to be preferred) 5. Allow right click to copy whole path in the address bar of folders (ctrl and c will do it now). And allow the same for copying things for 3 d boxes. 6. easily allow hot keys for fast launching (with free AutoHotKey you can make scripts to launch one, or even many many apps, etc. simultaneously - closest thing to a session saver) 7 Provide a master list of everything in the Control Panel, etc, (things like C:\Windows\System32\powercfg.cpl) for faster access. Stat menue should seldom need to be used. 8. Greatly improve Speech to Text (and vice versa) and commands to do the above (and turn on, off PC, etc.) so you can just say things like , "Go to ..." 9. Improve ability to see incoming and outgoing Internet traffic. 10. Can UAC, and use something like Winpatrol. 11. Add options to clipboard, to remember all (like clipboard diary) 12. Improve clock (colors, cpu load, free ram stats, etc.) 13. Allow changing file type icons on even basic versions of OS. 14. Put "copy to" and move to" as default options on right click menus (I have this). 15. Make it faster than Vista, which on a Dell E520 (3ghz cpu, 2.5gb ram) is slower than my W/98 (650mhz, 320mb ram) on basic tasks (navigating, opening folders), and slower than XP on the same PC. Even after tweaking and spare ram and low cpu load. (I do thank God for both, with Vista being overall better and more mature than XP)

reisen55
reisen55

First off it detonated my computer, does not GHOST as I wanted it to. And while I will reinstall, I was amazed it starts up AND LOOKS JUST LIKE VISTA. Hey, perception is many things. DO NOT MAKE IT LOOK LIKE VISTA f'crissake.

The Management consultant
The Management consultant

Dream on there is no tech solution for lack of confidence in MS management.This is a business problem which needs to be solved by business people not Wanna be 's who site on MS boards.Windows 7 will carry the mill stones from Vista dispite tech improvements "the biggest problem with microsoft is microsoft" (quote Richard Watts 2007)

paladin2
paladin2

I realize that may be a really stupid question, but for reasons a lot of you may understand but I don't. Sort of a halfwit as opposed to a total dimwit. But I really like XP Pro and aside from a service pack now and then what can possibly be that much better that they go to all this trouble developing "new" OSs at the expense of an existing platform that maybe could be redone into essentially the same final model you're looking for. Small package (compared to Vista, tiny), everybody knows it and like you say it's mostly the browser most people use most. I use mine for engineering design work at home but most of the time I'm either using Opera or it's minimized in the tray for quick access. So offer the Aero thing, Stardock already does, for twenty bucks. Make one big Service pack to fix whatever's supposed to be so horrible with XP, free updates to continue whether or not you chose the big paid service pack and offer extra upgrades for a price. It could be a design it yourself OS, sort of the way Dell lets me pick my processor, hard disk, screen resolution, bluetooth or not, same with other hardware that constitutes a laptop perfect for me, it would be the same deal only with software instead of hardware. I'm also not much of a businessman but know that everything's largely the application of common sense to a particular endeavor along with whatever specialized knowledge one deems necessary. I like my XP. I also like the Mac desktop, so I have that too, courtesy of Stardock for twenty bucks. I also have my own security system that I trust as much or more than the 'enhanced' security in Vista, it certainly sounds easier than whatever it is about Vista and security that has every single user I know of that OS screaming bloody murder. But I'm almost totally stupid with the details of writing a million lines, or for that matter 10 lines of code, but sort of understand the theory. Like I sorta of know how to make an atomic bomb. Sounds pretty simple on paper, again the devil's in the details. But I don't want to "upgrade" to anything. There are a few things I'd like to see added or deleted from XP. I'd even pay for some of them. Is this a stupid dream or is it possible?

tigger76
tigger76

Sometimes you have to take a step back to take several steps forward. Windows is no different

Rooooo
Rooooo

Not to be rude, but you really don't have much to say here. This is all just the same ol' same ol'. Microsoft has reasons to do what it does, like having multiple versions of Windows. It's a thing which is really obviously noticeable and therefore easy to complain about for tech support, but not really significant. Bottom line, Microsoft has nothing. If Vista is not interesting for people, why should Windows 7 be? Ok, yank everything and make it a rehashed version of Windows 2000 with maybe support for 64 bit standard. Yipee, that's about as different as every time we vote for a politician and this time things will be different. We're voting for CHANGE!

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

to see MS fix what is broken, and not fix what ain't.

darcypa
darcypa

Vista is so bad it has done me a favour. I have gone to Suse. It works and quickly. More importantly, it does NOT ask for permission to do everything! padarcy

dpresley_50201
dpresley_50201

Jason, What you suggest is quite similar to the GNU/Linux model of modularity; Linux being the core OS and the GNU project being the modules to add as much functionality any user desires. This model would be the most desirable and efficient way to distribute and update Windows by far. It is also why so many users like myself have, at least partially, switched to some user friendly Linux distro (PCLinuxOS for me). MS needs to take notice and adopt this model for their new paradigm.

Dragonofdepth@Yahoo.com
Dragonofdepth@Yahoo.com

Everything this article contains I agree with but not with subscription. I am wondering now if Jason Hiner has shares in Microsoft. Common folks should not ever pay for subscription on an OS. If or when it occurs, it is going to cause problems for consumers in the future that we may not foresee at the moment. His suggestion is that the renewal should be every three years but what if MS (Microsoft) decide that it wants to make it 6 months to use limited features and 12 months for a full year with all the features operational and additional stuff. Remember they did split Vista into four groups (Vista Basic, Home Premium, Business, & Ultimate) which is silly. Why shouldn't we think that if they decide to do that, that they make us pay a yearly fee. Everyone in the country is wealthy. The only knows thinking this is acceptable are those that are well off. Some people scrape by just to buy a PC that is affordable that they can make their children use that they can be computer literate and also to teach themselves. Subscription is evil when it comes to operating systems. That's my view.

Frank_Rizzo
Frank_Rizzo

OSX is not $99. OSX starts at $129 at which point you pay $99 for every minor update. You're not paying for OS-XI with that money, you're paying for an update to an EXISTING OS. On top of that I'd take Linux or Windows over Crapple any day of the week. OSX is sub-par at the user level and is unusable at the business level.

Master G
Master G

I experimented with Redhat, Mandrake, SUSE, Ubuntu and like 15 other Linux Flavors. Just last night I installed Fedora 9 in my mother's laptop just to get a peek at it. OH she is keeping it and I will too. It's always good to have a XP machine somewhere in house thought. Vista hasn't done a great job, it's like getting the ME nightmare again. Tried it on a top of the line desktop and it was dragging. And then those security features -Jeebuss!! It's like going backwards. As for enterprise, we are looking into a Linux base system then run Window Server 2003 virtually -which that's how many companies are saving money and cutting back on expenses - Spend once and then no more. Besides, Linux is a better and stable system than Windows. The market for Mini Notebooks with Linux installed is growing like there is not tomorrow. I dont think Windows will survive if it needs the same kind of power that Vista needs to run properly.

bblackmoor
bblackmoor

Why bother releasing any new version of Windows at all? XP works fine for what I use it for: games and Adobe Photoshop. For everything else, there is Linux. I don't see any need for a new version of Windows... ever.

woody
woody

I think its NUTS to embrace turning Windows into a subscription product. Have you forgotten Vista???? Can you imagine getting stuck with another Millennium or a another Vista version... and not having the ability to shut it off and go back to what works.. What if the company you work for , has a software package that is mission critical, say an accounting package. The next version of Windows will be automatically downloaded and installed and suddenly you discover your accounting software doesn???t work.. isn???t compatible and now your company is hard down??? everyone???s standing around looking at you (your jobs on the line) and you find yourself making that support call with a credit card in hand... How much will that cost.. in terms of both, Microsoft support and in company down time???? I won???t want it??? life is too short for that BS.. MS is so afraid of loosing out on revenue they would make us all slaves, tied to their machine and paying monthly for it??? I???m a grown up. I like to make my own choices. I???m an IT professional I like to have control of my Systems??? I decide what software gets installed and when??? I get paid to Plan, Purchase & Implement. Is the next step for MS to eliminate the IT staff? It wouldn't be the first time we've seen that move in software... Remember the VAR..? They were replace by the software companies going direct..

reisen55
reisen55

1. Minor hardware change. Existing desktop base in corp is HUGE and funds are tight now. You cannot demand corps throw out everything to make a change. 2. Business case for change has to be DRAMATIC Why did BlueRay DVD die? Because it was not a seismic shift in technology. DVD beat VHS because the quality is soooo much better and easier to use. Windows 7 has to be dramatically different from XP and Vista. 3. Test and Test and Test Microsoft apps run great on Vista, other third apps do not. Death Certificate applied and granted. 4. Migration MUST BE PAINLESS and tested too. No horror shows allowed. 5. No Arrogance from Ballmer. He was too damn smart on Vista being something to install out of the box with NO THIRD PARTY anything required for security. Oh, right. 6. DO NOT RELEASE UNTIL IT IS THOROUGHLY VETTED. No surprises, no pauses, do it right once and then release, but make sure it is RIGHT the first time. 7. Remember OS/2 WARP. ..............wherever it is.

davionics
davionics

If you go back some 6 posts in the main thread, you'll see my wish list for things I really want to see. Being a programmer, I kind of want scriptability and configurability kinds of things. My contention is that the only way for MS to have a successful rollout in their next O/S is to give people what they really WANT! It feels to me like MS kind of shoved Vista down our throats. The argument: "because I said so" hasn't worked on me since I was 15. So I'd really like to know what features would make you open your wallets/pocketbooks and spring for the next version of Windows. Thanks! Dave M.

Tearat
Tearat

Don't know if anyone else has said this Something they could do is integrate Virtual PC into the OS and supply images for all the previous OS They don't have to install them all just the ones you choose That would solve all the legacy problems Improving Virtual PC along with Win 7 updates will also make things better I can hope anyway

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

You can download an early beta of Win7 with a basic taskbar from most torrent sites now. Vista SP1 rules and Windows7 sucks. It's so blaoated and has useless features and you can't find anything if you are used to Win3.11. I don't want to retrain everyone just so they can play solitaire in 3D. Why should I buy a new machine just to run Windows7? I am going to downgrade everyone I build computers for because Vista is better and I don't think they want to learn a new OS if I don't even want to. Check out my Vistafanboi site at www.windows7suxthebig1.ca I am going to wait for Windows 8, I'm sure it will be faster and run on a 386. :D Too early for that yet?

mdhealy
mdhealy

Points 2 and 4 are the main reasons my company is sticking with XP for the time being -- to get all the features with get with XP Pro we'd have to get Vista Ultimate, and even with volume discounts the additional dollars times over 30 thousand client boxes comes to a hefty total at a time of tight budgets. AND after spending those dollars we'd also break many things.

josephtaypin
josephtaypin

Business is business.I'll do my business with the one I very much know, and that's XP!

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

I don't use the net for much. While large companies have huge IT staffs to protect their equipment, I don't. So, I don't ever at anytime (including even my name) put anything sensitive on my computer (names, dates, account numbers, billing etc. etc.)or do anything of substance on the net. I want bits in a box. I want an OS that works especially when not connected to the net.

davionics
davionics

In my view, what the next great O/S nees are features, features features! Not graphical gimmicks, but true O/S enhancements. Why? Because in order to sell the next O/S you HAVE TO GIVE USERS A REASON TO WANT IT! Of the 5 items Jason lists, only one of them would be a truly useful item: the ability to handle both 64 and 32 bit apps. MS did it with the 32 vs 16 bit divide. They called it a 'thunking layer'. Any reason they can't do that with 64 vs 32? Of the other 4 items Jason lists, XP already does that today. Smart IT departments have figured out how to tweak XP to be secure enough. It's relatively inexpensive, and fast enough. And compatibility issues have mostly been solved (except for the 32 vs 64 bit thing). So the question remains: what will Win7 have that XP doesn't? Here's my wish list: 1. Being able to script Windows messages so you can automate your apps. 2. Ability to save the state so that, if you have to reboot, you can quickly return all your apps to the state they were in. 3. No more BSOD. Have useful messages telling you what happened. Also ability to save off what you were in the middle of so you don't loose everything! 4. Make the desktop more like an HTML page, so users/vendors can customize/animate it. 5. Release the next version of Dos Prompt, with colors (ala OS/2), cut & paste (ala X-Windows), and an easy to use scripting language like Ruby or JS. I know Power Shell exists and may serve a useful purpose for some admins, but it's clunky and not a graceful upgrade from the good, old fashioned Dos Window. 6. The next MS-Paint. I'd love to see layers, a 'nudge' feature, arrows & connectors, smarter text control (so you could center text within boxes, for example). 7. The next WordPad. A kind of Word-lite, but with tables, macros, etc... In order to keep O/S costs down, MS could offer the beefed up apps as an add-on. I, for one, would be happy to pay for it! MS, are you listening??? Dave

britnat
britnat

Spot on! Microsoft has been playing the dictator since Windows ME, and the marketplace is now realizing that Linux is a viable option (if only the Linux boys could all get their act together) The next couple of years are going to be very interesting. The massive corporations should remember that dinosaurs were huge, but they're extinct non-the-less.

sean.smith
sean.smith

RAMDISK. If they could boot the OS on to a ramdisk, that would increase security and speed. If you have a 64 bit OS, you have the memory space for 100+ gigs or ram. Stream line it and load it into ram. Secondly, I think you could make some sort of security based on this. Something like never write to the hard disk, prompt to write to the hard disk, never prompt to write to the hard disk. Just my 10 (two bits). :-)

kennethlaskoski
kennethlaskoski

What? Better, how much? "over 50 million lines of code in Vista". That is the figure? They are trying to apply Moore's law to software? Squeezing LOCs is not the same thing than squeezing transistors, I guess. Some day, they will need a storage cluster to hold the code base alone. And the binary will run perfectly, giving the final answer: 42.

Buff Loon
Buff Loon

Microsoft has finally used its marketing Ideology to a semi-disasterous position with the failure to succesfully market the Vista OS. Bill Gates is/was not any programing genius, not even any kind of genius in PCing. His good fortune (Microsofts) came from developing the OS into a product that was very marketable when the PC was still in its infancy. Give IBM partial credit for developing the concept of using an OS that would interface with compatible code in add-on software to perform all manner of tasks. Bill Gates using the genius and expertise of several engineers and software programers discovered an opportunity to develop a product that Business needed (wanted) and would buy into as a tool which would enhance thier need (greed) for greater productivity and profits. Microsoft (Bill Gates et al) well understood that the strongest and greatest marketing tool is "Feed the Greed Often", Hence developing and upgrading the product to be new and more productive with every new version. Being a Lawyer, he well understood the ins and outs of developing a product that would monopolize his intended market, and used the talent he recruited to develop an organization (Microsoft) that would develop an OS that would interface with word proccessing, accounting methodology and several media for science and entertainment (a broad market), in short stay as far ahead of any competition by being more powerful, exclusive and glamorous so as to appeal to the broadest market. Microsofts Plateau was reached with win 98 and developed further with the subsequent issues of MS OS's, with XP probably at the Zenith. The Microsoft Marketing Ideology ("Feed the Greed Often") finally caught up with Microsoft, MS was trying to maintain its monopoly with PC OSs and spread its monopoly into laptops, gaming, and handhelds as well as any future products, ie: email, Search engines, Advertising, Music, Video etc.... Microsoft is not dead or dying, but its Greedy marketing ideology will drive a wooden stake into its cold bloodless heart unless it sees the light. Big Business does not mind being raped occasionally if it is profitable and not any great bother, but Business has its own life and chooses how to live its life, not as someone dictates how it does so. This time around Business was not in the mood to be taken advantage of, Microsoft had interfered in its lifestyle too much. I Agree, MS OS 7 had better be more charismatic and Compatible with who it will bunk with, Computing is at a plateau ready to climb to a new Zenith. That my take, Plato aka Buff Oon

dogknees
dogknees

Here we go again. Not everyone has or can get broadband internet access. This is true in the US, let alone other countries. Until we have ubiquitous broadband, meaning for every single person on the planet that wants it, the idea of subscription software cannot happen. You can't remove a method of purchase unless you provide an alternative for ALL those who wish to buy.

jackie40d
jackie40d

Its an Ideal which would work "IF" MS got its head out ! Making that popping sound you know . . All you got to do is peddle the Ideal to Microsoft and its big think tank of geeks . . GOOD LUCK Its something which would make MS a lot of money if they ever did it . . Would be like going through the grocery store and picking what things you want to buy for food . . ANY ONE WANT some more turkey ? I got lots left over . . !

MaeseRalf
MaeseRalf

Hi paladin! Although I had some difficulties to understand your words, and couldn't see which one you claim against (hope than M$), I found you are saying more or less the same than me and many others here. Well, we call it Linux, CP/M, Modula or any other name you choose, instead of XP. For us, you should pass to one of the Linux distros, but the industry should reflect and assume the opposite approach of simplify the XP, and make it 64b/X-core capable, better than go to new more complex structures offering just less speed for more performances. It should be funny (if not infuriating) to verify that my old Wordperfect 5.1 over DOS 3.1 was much more faster and almost the same powerful (from the utility point of view) running in an old 486DX2, than a simple Wordpad in a quad core. What is really funny is to realize that actually the latest version of Windows is offered with 32b capacity, and you have to pay for the "ultimate-pro", to get a real 64b/X-core platform. But Marketing, instead of "common-sense" is what populate Microsoft's managers mind. And the thing goes worse! Current applications are (from an engineers/utility point of view) too much slower than a generation ago. My latest version of Firefox takes more than a minute to load; you can read two or three mails before it comes to your screen. An old "Carbon-copy" just popped-up at almost the same moment you hit the "enter" key. And that's the real way I like the things being. "Do what I need in the fitting time the chores need!" Why on hell should I have to wait to see the result of my summation, meanwhile the computer is updating the "thumbnails" of mi pictures, or something alike, so stupid for my current work? Imagine a Vista" equipped fighter, when the pilot has to fire his weapons, and he should wait for the OS in the computer finishing its "indexing of files" to shoot. Sure the USSR pilot had your fighter blasted. Might we need another "cold-war" to get common-sense?

cjshelby
cjshelby

But you, like most of us in this conversation, have common sense. Something that's sorely lacking at M$, or in consumers at large. M$ figures if people are willing to stand in line and pay 5 bucks for a coffee, well then they'll be stupid enough to spend their money (or even money they don't have) on pretty much any old crap. FYI, I just set up and old PII IBM thinkpad for my 8yo girl to visit educational web sites on, even got wireless to work!

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

instead of doing a side shuffle and three steps backwards.

Tearat
Tearat

I love your routine Lol Microsoft fixes their mistakes and does not make new ones I had a very good laugh at that one You could do better Just insist you are serious Fun a side They will never do that BF there is no money in it

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

There's something that works properly in Windows???

FXEF
FXEF

Dragonofdepth, you kinda hit the nail on the head with the subscription issue. If MS goes to OS subscriptions for home users, good-bye Windows.... Hello Ubuntu Linux. I just don't think the "Joe the computer user" is ready for OS subscriptions.

Nicholas.Newman@Skynet.be
Nicholas.Newman@Skynet.be

Apart from the cost of changing versions of OS X, e.g. $129 for Leopard after Tiger, and no doubt a similar sum for the consolidated and ruggedised and Intel-only Snow Leopard when it comes out, compared to vastly greater sums for Vista after XP, and no doubt soon for Windows 7, what exactly do you reproach Apple systems for? Personally, I have run and used every Windows system from Windows 2 to XP, and have not tried Vista as XP is enough for my MS needs (indeed I still have 98 running in a dual-boot machine because of certain software that won't run with XP, very rarely used), but it's a far greater pain to maintain XP than my 2 year old OS X system (based of course on Unix, which is sometimes very useful). Would you like to be more specific about what you don't like about Apple's systems? It must be something to do with a difference in environment, I suspect.

rkell25
rkell25

Well because basically the bad-guys malware etc. Are constantly evolving their methodology so we need a revamped os to make it harder for them. Anyway as new tech comes on stream and new ways of computing come about wouldn't it be better to have an os that is designed with the new tech in mind? BTW I am an average user and I definitely don't want a subscription model as MS could up their charges or other undesirable things. If you look at the average user subscription, the most succesfull is World of Warcraft with 9-million vs 1.1bn potential users.

dhamilt01
dhamilt01

Microsoft has us by the balls and now they are going to start squeezing. The only solution is IF we go somewhere else ... in the millions. I hope this depression coming on will cause us to stop buying Microsft by the millions. Then maybe they will rethink their greedy ways and just maybe do what the customer wants for a change. Subscription = Big Brother ... and it won't be pretty folks. Wake up!

TrueDinosaur
TrueDinosaur

Fast file copy, fast directory logging, CRC/hash file/directory compares/sync, simpler GUI

Tearat
Tearat

Wrong it?s the other way round You could give the sales pitch a rest sometime No one will notice go on give it a try you might like it

andy18699
andy18699

When clicking onto www.windows7suxthebig1.ca is comes back with the following: Cannot be found or is not available. Sorry, 'www.windows7suxthebig1.ca' does not exist or is not available.

andy18699
andy18699

When clicking onto www.windows7suxthebig1.ca is comes back with the following: Cannot be found or is not available.

cubeslave
cubeslave

I agree you ought to be about to tell the kernel to stay in RAM. Being able to boot to some "do not write to disk" mode would be a useful function. I hate the code in windows that forces your system to swap to the hard disk, and how it prefers to automatically allocate swap space on the hard drive in relation to how much RAM you have. They are essentially saying that no matter how much RAM you have it is not enough, no matter how few programs you might want to run at one time. When I tried turning off swapping under XP. I assumed that I wouldn't be able to run many programs at once, but I assumed there would be a speed increase without the drive bottleneck. As I remember it got pretty upset with me since it wants at least a token sliver of drive space to swap (my guess is some code left over form the "640K is enough ram for anyone" days is the cause). The fact that Vista now allows you to use a flash drive for the swap space (If you have one that is big enough and fast enough) shows that even they know it is a problem.

Zenith545
Zenith545

I suppose this blogger thinks that running all your apps and your OS off a server is OK also. Subscriptions may be OK with businesses, they are already heavily into licensing fees, but for the consumer - no way, Jose. This is what Microsoft proposes. It is BULL. More Orwellian thinking. It is actually funny how many people that praised Vista as the latest and greatest are now saying how bad it is, but I don't think Microsoft is listening, evidenced by Office 2007.

cubeslave
cubeslave

It has always blown my mind how Microsoft has grown into the 800lb gorilla of the software world and still wants to grow up to be the old IBM. Even IBM isn't IBM anymore.

FXEF
FXEF

Not sure the general public likes the steps and moves Windows is making. Vista has not turned many heads.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Man, this is just way too funny! :D

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I KNEW 'someone' would miss the joke and try to find the site, well done!. :D

jackie40d
jackie40d

Vista has turned out to another windblows ME had so much wrong it was not supported beyond a 1 year or 2. . Its been interesting watching the Mac Commercials and the guy they have playing the PC . . with all the slight ahum statements about Vista's inability to get it right !

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