iPhone

Sanity check: The five reasons I wouldn't use an iPhone are down to one

When I explain the two factors that are revolutionary about the iPhone, I'm often asked why I don't use one. With the first generation iPhone, there were five factors that kept me from using it, but that list is now down to one.

When I explain the two factors that are revolutionary about the iPhone, I'm often asked why I don't use one. With the first generation iPhone, there were five factors that kept me from using it, but that list is now down to one.

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Two of the most common technology questions that I've been asked over the past year are "Have you used the iPhone?" and "What makes it so special?" I typically respond that TechRepublic has an iPhone and that the product isn't perfect nor is it a phone for everyone, but it's a watershed device that will change mobile computing.

For those who want to know more, I explain that there two reasons why the iPhone is revolutionary. At the point, many people have asked me why I don't use the device, since I think it's such a revolution. I have typically replied with five reasons why I wouldn't want to use it -- the first-generation iPhone -- on a day-to-day basis.

Take a look at the two things that I think make the iPhone revolutionary, the five reasons I didn't use the original iPhone, and the one reason why I still won't use the iPhone 3G.

Why the iPhone is revolutionary

The iPhone made the full Web browsing experience useful on a cell phone for the first time. That is its greatest triumph. Instead of relying on dumbed-down mobile versions of Web sites, with the iPhone you can pull up almost any site on the Internet and get a decent browsing experience, with a few exceptions (some technologies such as Flash and ActiveX don't work on the iPhone).

What made the iPhone a fully-capable Web browsing device is its touch-based user-interface, the iPhone's other revolutionary feature. Specifically, the iPhone's pinch-to-zoom feature has made it super easy to zoom in and out of full-sized Web pages. Plus, the rest of the touch-based interface makes the iPhone fast and intuitive to navigate.

Five reasons I didn't use the original iPhone

  1. Speed -- The bad thing about loading up full-size Web pages is that most of them are quite large. Many sites assume users have fast broadband connections. The iPhone's Web browser is abysmally slow when connected over the cellular network (and still not super-fast when connected via Wi-Fi). Many sites never even load at all. The iPhone 3G is better, but there are still times when a non-3G BlackBerry or Treo will  load a mobile Web page far faster than the iPhone 3G will load the full Web page from the site. The iPhone Web browser simple renders pages slowly, since it's using Safari like a Mac OS X computer but the iPhone has far less processing power than even the slowest Mac.
  2. Price --At $499 (4 GB) and $599 (8 GB), the original iPhone was way too pricey for me to justify, and I'm sure many IT departments felt the same way. Apple eventually dropped the price of the 8 GB iPhone to $399, but that wasn't low enough for me, since the iPhone still had other limitations. Apple has dropped the price of the iPhone 3G to a more palatable $199 (8 GB) and $299 (16 GB).
  3. E-mail --The primary reason that I use my smartphone is for checking e-mail. Since the first iPhone did not include support for push e-mail and could not connect to Microsoft Exchange it simply was not a viable replacement for a Treo, BlackBerry, or Windows Mobile device. Apple has rectified that by building Exchange ActiveSync support into the iPhone 3G.
  4. Headphone jack --Although it's nitpicky, one of the most maddening features of the original iPhone was its recessed headphone jack. This meant that you could only use Apple's proprietary headphones, which don't fit my ears and hurt whenever I try. The only other option was to buy an adapter to make the jack compatible with normal headphones. Thankfully, Apple has replaced this with a standard jack in the iPhone 3G.
  5. Keyboard -- For me, the worst feature of the original iPhone was its on-screen keyboard. While it's better and more intuitive than the on-screen keyboard in Windows Mobile and other devices, it is still not very useful when you need to do any kind of serious typing. It's just too slow and error-prone. It really forces you to hunt-and-peck with one finger. I have much better luck using my thumbs on the qwerty keyboards that come on most smartphones.

Will I use the iPhone 3G?

Apple rectified the first four items on my list with the iPhone 3G, but unfortunately the on-screen keyboard remains. If the iPhone 3G had a slide-down qwerty keyboard in landscape mode, I would have seriously considered adopting it. However, without a usable keyboard the device is still just an innovative, ground-breaking piece of technology that doesn't quite have a place in my day-to-day life yet. And, I also wouldn't recommend it to any IT leaders or business users who need to do a significant amount of typing from a smartphone.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

179 comments
greg.hruby
greg.hruby

I don't use an iPhone because the cost benefit analysis for me didn't justify it. The article would have been more helpful if it compared the cost of the iPhone ( or blackberry, treo, etc.) using the web services, etc. to perform work VS. the alternatives. this article is a prima-donna piece. It would be a pleasant change if the "I" in IT would occaisionally mean intelligent, intellectual, integrity instead of the insipid "I". Get over the personal-I-ty approach to systems.

cfithian
cfithian

Well I think that each to his own when it comes to the iPhone - I went from a crappy flip phone, to a Treo, to a Nokia E series phone, to a blackberry and finally landed on the iPhone - I wont use anything else - In fact I feel a bit retarded when I use regular phones, weird to say but I am super comfortable with the iPhone and cant ever imagine going to a cell with a qwerty keyboard again... I will be using the iphone when im 90 years old... By far in my opinon the BEST device I ever paid and the best $600.00 I ever spent... in fact, I will buy the 3G one in about 6 months to a year or whatever comes out after..... I highly suggest it - All though the new software upgrade has capabilities to use exchange, being an IT pro, when your connected to work, you never have a work-life balance... So I dont use it for that reason.... I like that its personal and works great! Thanks for reading...

sergiovf
sergiovf

And I 'll give you 1 reason why I buy this thingy - ... CUPERTINO. I think I will never buy anything coming out of Redmond. Thank the heavens this product came out of Cupertino. Long live the Dancing Bear Dinosaurus and his Empire of 95% users in USA. I bow down to you oh mighty machiavello, but you don't get me to use your EUL A $$$$$ junk-a-warez. Typed in an old PowerPC G4 notebook full to the rim of Open Source FREE as in Beer applications.

elvisfan0108
elvisfan0108

One of the things that I need when I am using the phone is "Voice Dial". I have been using a cell phone for years. I can't believe that devices without voice dial are still being introduced. Why should I need to install software to use voice dial?

fox
fox

From what I have read in this post the good and the bad is all subjective. Whatever device you choose will be based on what you want and what service is available in your area. When I lived in IL Sprint was better than AT&T. Where I am at now AT&T generally has better coverage than the others. Yes they are all cell phone companies and each individual does not have the same experience as the next. So... if you live in an area where AT&T sucks, by all means either unlock the iPhone or don't get one. If the iPhone doesn't have everything you want or like or need, don't get it. As for it being better or worse than the competition, its just different. Like Microsoft's OS is different than Apple's OS. Each has their limitations. Same goes for cell phones and their service carriers.

DvT-Hex
DvT-Hex

It is a cell phone. I will never consider owning one until they remove this virus from the system. Even then, why would I want to browse the net on a 3" (or whatever it is) screen when I have a 22" monitor on my computer? Why would I want to type on a 3" on-screen keyboard (or a slide-out keyboard) when I have Logitech G15? There is not a single thing that the iPhone can do that my full tower gaming computer cannot do better. The fact that my tower weighs about 50 lbs and takes up quite a bit of space is a major advantage over the primary function of any mobile device: to be annoying to everyone, including the owner. Just think how fun it would be to set up a LAN party on an airplane with full blown gaming rigs each of which being equipped with 7.1 speakers. Not to mention the added bonus of 350 people bringing these systems thru airport "security" to board a 747.

Snuffy.
Snuffy.

I've been using a Palm Centro since they first became available last fall and I love it! Other than built-in WiFi there's nothing an iPhone does that my Centro doesn't -- and at a fraction of the price! In one package I have an internet radio receiver, am able to watch web-based TV shows, get e-mail pushed from my Exchange server, browse the web with either the built-in Blazer browser or Opera Mini and watch movie files stored on micro SD cards. And yes, I've used an iPhone (some of my customers have them) and I find the touchscreen keyboard very irritating. The other big drawback is how easily the screen gets smudged. I don't think I'd be too happy having to wipe the screen every time I wanted to use the device.

benjandpurge
benjandpurge

geez, I have read so many reviews and psuedo-opinions about whether "I" (standing on soapboxes) would use the iPhone or not. I find the article humorous because he won't use the phone because of a limitation with himself, not the phone. If it was because of push e-mail. I could understand, but " I can't get used to the onscreen keyboard" boo hoo. I have used my iPhone for almost a year now and I wouldn't go back to a treo or crackberry for love or money, and I'm certainly not an apple fan, as the I have major issues with the lack of an expansion memory slot and non replaceable battery. But I use the keyboard like a pro. I have to laugh when people take sides in the apple/pc war, but why? Thats another post. This story comes off as a big whine while stating more obvious features we've heard for a year now, come on tech rep some new whines please!

captvideo1114
captvideo1114

The biggest downfall to the iPown is that you have to send your phone back to crapple and let them rip you off again just to change the battery. Let's face it, ALL batteries need replacing sooner than later. I can change the battery in my phone for about $20 and in less than a minute.

pgupta7
pgupta7

I think the biggest reason is the their lockup with At&T and expensive plan to carry. There is no choice for other providers. iPhone features are innovative , fun and productive to use. I would prefer a $299 or even $399 iPhone but a lower monthly bill.

erslincoln
erslincoln

Love the new version, but lack of other network availability rules me out.

steve
steve

I couldn't get the IPhone to do SSL.

ilovesards
ilovesards

to survive in this world, i need ms excel ratio and proportions, percentage calculations and spelling checks==not mentionrd in any iphone talkz. i use jasjar and redesigned a case to insert immediately in my pocket. apple should build a tougher,easy to use phone.

Brent Fitzpatrick
Brent Fitzpatrick

I think you are crazy. I believe (and I have had experience will over a dozen different smart phones) the iPhone keyboard is by far the best most intuitive keyboard out there. I know the Blackberry has its fans but at some point they will have toopen their eyes.

Slartibartfast
Slartibartfast

Here's two more: it doesn't synch Outlook tasks or notes, and it doesn't have cut & paste. In addition, using OMA doesn't give you the same granularity of control as Blackberry Enterprise Server (no surprises there). However: Since getting the 3G, my Blackberry 8820 hasn't been on my belt, it's been completely displaced by the iPhone. I'll live with the deficiencies of the iPhone as the positive aspects outweigh the negative. Yes, I'd consider myself a 'power user', and I determine the mobile strategy for my company. I'm definitely going to give mobile users the choice as early as next month.

gochga
gochga

Coordination and accuracy are gifts. Personally, watching folks hunched over their blackberries typing with both hands is repulsive. They just look like monkeys peeling a banana.

jameskatt
jameskatt

I love the solid-glass on-screen keyboard on the iPhone. Once I got about a month of daily practice on it with my usual text messaging and email, I find that I can write faster and LONGER on the iPhone than any smartphone with physical buttons. The key is getting the muscle memory so that you type with high accurary. Then you will realize that the iPhone has no key-travel. It is a touch typer's dream keyboard. There is no delay that is inherent in physical keyboards. With even more practice, such as with kids, you can touch type with both thumbs. Then, typing on the iPhone is even faster! On the iPhone, I find myself regularly writing emails and text messages that are 9 times longer than the ones I receive from my colleagues - who use both regular cellphones and smart-phones. It is so easy to do a long text on the iPhone!

gbrocks
gbrocks

You wrote: ???It???s just too slow and error-prone. It really forces you to hunt-and-peck with one finger.??? The on screen keyboard, coupled with it???s software, is one of the iPhone???s innovations. I have used other devices. The iPhone keyboard is at least as fast, and perhaps more accurate than the devices you mentioned, because of the way it adapts its accuracy to the users touch.

brian
brian

I found it absolutely useless when doing simple configuration changes. Imagine the thrill of reconfiguring a router or firewall using that keyboard as the interface? Oh joy, let's retype that line a few times, shall we? SH*T, NO SH*T (Those who configure routers and have used the iPhone get the humor and the frustration.) Until they have a version with a real keyboard, its just an iPod w/ cellphone capabilities to me, and my iPod is collecting dust.

michael.patrick
michael.patrick

1.Cannot tether. As a road warrior, I often cannot connect to a company network, I use my phone as a Broadband modem. 2. No Voice command. I wear a headset and use voice command a lot. 3. Cannot swap sim cards with my weekend phone. I carry a small flip phone on the weekends. The new Iphone does not allow swapping of sim cards.

CorporateLackie
CorporateLackie

Why can't I sync. to-do list & notes from Outlook??? For the life of me I can not figure out why Apple chose to not sync. the to-do list and notes data from Outlook.... Am I the ONLY guy that wants my Outlook to-do list sync-ed to the iPhone? Is there a reasonable alternative/work-around for this? At this point I'd buy one except for that ... my other key issue (password storage) is addressed by SplashID coming up with an iPhone version of their product. THANKS in advance for any suggestions on the to-do list issue!!!!

dkenny
dkenny

I'd also add that that Apple's exclusive partnership with AT&T means that I'm not getting one anytime soon. AT&T coverage is lousy in our area. And what good is a cell phone with all the bells and whistles when it doesn't connect to its network?

dcolbert
dcolbert

I've become convinced that the 3G iPhone becomes a compelling platform as a consumer digital convergence device, and I agree that all of your 5 issues above have been rectified, and were strong reasons why the iPhone was not a serious contender, previously. I think the iPhone could leverage this to eventually be a serious smart-phone competitor in the enterprise workspace. BUT - I think you missed one additional, compelling reason not to make the switch. I've got a significant investment in personal, business, productivity and enterprise Windows Mobile applications. Windows Mobile is entrenched in the business community much the same way that Win32 is from a software perspective. It is unclear how quickly the iPhone app store will produce alternative applications, and of what quality those will be, and what kind of expense would be involved in a software switch supporting a hardware switch. That is another significant concern to me. If my next phone is a Win Mobile phone, odds are all of my existing software moves with me painlessly. If it is an iPhone, I'm hunting for all new apps.

IT-->PM
IT-->PM

When I bought my 1st gen iPhone, the unlimited data plan was $20/month. The plans for other full-feature web/e-mail phones was $40/month. I figured the difference in data plans made up the $200 difference in 10 months and then I was ahead. What do data plans cost now? Is the 3g iPhone plan the same or more per month?

dmiller
dmiller

"...If the iPhone 3G had a slide-down qwerty keyboard in landscape mode, I would have seriously considered adopting it..." it does have a landscape keyboard on most applications dude.

icedivr
icedivr

Don't forget that the phone doesn't allow tethering, and since Apple controls which applications are authorized to run on the phone, there may never be a supported means of doing so.

gwcrouch
gwcrouch

I was in the same boat as Jason (although on Twitter he sounded pretty pumped to be getting one...) with the keyboard. But I use Evernote, a lot, and now see how seemlessly the iPhone syncs with the Mac and apps - far better than any other mobile device. I can get over the keyboard with the superior syncing ability and Evernote.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I don't understand why people stand in line to be the first to get something. By letting some other goobers shuck out 600 clams to do Apple's gamma testing, those who purchased the newest versions get a better, cheaper piece of equipment. Moral: never be first in line for a new technology.

greg.hruby
greg.hruby

glad you like the device, but aside from personal preference, could you justify the device over another under a cost benefit analysis compared to a) alternative similar devices, b) better scheduling of work tasks c) better use of existing staff to perform tasks, d) development of company policies to more rigorous testing before releasing questionable systems into production. The point I make is that technology driven by personal ( or personnel) preference for a orgnaization wide solution has an embeded problem to start with. Essentially furthering the axiom, "there aint no 'we" in IT" the biggest problem is the uneven playing field. not the ecnonomic issue, but the general management issue. how do you mow a field with a nail-clipper? how do you trim a rose with an John Deere tractor? Development of a systemic approach to design, deployment and life-cycel management by all participating members in their respective roles is generally lacking when discussing tools. Is tool specificity the answer? ( more gadgets each with fewer but more powerfully functional tools) Is development of expanded capability in a suite of increasingly more complex tools the answer? (bottom end tools allow communication equivalent to ping, high end permit graphical interface and real-time editing tool applications with security based systems and storage of modifications for later retrieval - all managed against a central DB/control system. Tech Repubic could begin by inventing the the virtual "well-managed" system and then let the TechRepublic users begin editing that system - lets see where the technology community arrives. Greg

cartoonsbydavid
cartoonsbydavid

Dudes. Really. The iPhone changes EVERY DAY - 700 apps and counting. One stop shopping. One friggin' click to install. Oh, yes, the Win-mobile crowd has 18,000 apps - great! However, in 18,000 locations - good luck with that. And, just like no other phone is used to surf as much as the iPhone, these 500 apps are so easy to install that EVERYBODY is installing them, thousands a DAY. Your app will come. NOT on a web page. On the iPhone with that other gazillions of apps.

dcolbert
dcolbert

People who are so caught up in what *I* am doing that it offends them. "Are you smoking on a public street? I could just AVOID you, but I would much rather walk by, look annoyed, and pointedly cough as I walk through the fumes of your cloud of smoke". I just don't get people who are so sensitive to their own personal space in public that they feel that they should have some sort of say on how other people use THEIR personal public space. If we're in a movie theater and my phone RINGS and I try to take the call in my seat, that is one thing. If it BUZZES, and I answer quietly while getting up to leave the theater, DEAL with it. Sounds less like a problem with my behavior than your inability to focus and easily distracted, short attention span. Are you on a plane and someone has a kid that is crying? You *really* can't tune it out? You think that parent is having a ball? Instead of telling that parent, "Why don't you shut your kid up", why don't you just choke on your own tongue and do the rest of the world a favor? I mean, in the past, it was the housewife constantly looking out of her blinds trying to figure out what was going on over at the house across the street. Anybody ever watch Bewitched on TV? Today it is the person who blows a gasket over a cell-phone conversation in a busy, noisy resturaunt. MYOFB, busybody. I can't imagine going through life completely preoccupied and consumed with what everybody ELSE is doing. Why do you CARE so much? We're turning this into a world that caters to the sensibilities of the most easily offended - and those people are generally the most annoying people in society themselves.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

"I'm a big kid now!" Just got a diaper jingle in my head when I read your title...damn commercials! Then again, I completely agree, the shortcomings of this phone, for the money you spend make it a ridiculous choice compared to others that offer all the iphone features and quote a bit more at a lower cost and with lower monthly service rates. What a scam!

jimtravis
jimtravis

I did not purchase an iPhone because both versions are too feature deficient for my needs. If an iPhone meets your needs, fine, you have a slim, elegant device. I did purchase an iPod touch so I could use Mobile Safari, multi-touch, and finger scrolling extensively. I see constant posts about how Mobile Safari is the absolute best mobile browser bar none, and no other mobile browser is even close. Many think there were no capable full internet mobile browsers before Mobile Safari. Although Pocket IE is one of the best browsers for the mobile internet, it was not designed for viewing the full web. When Pocket IE was introduced, mobile data speeds were so slow you would not want to view the full web. There are several capable full internet browsers other than Mobile Safari, and they were available before the iPhone was introduced. I started using NetFront (version 3.1) in 2004. NetFront was the included browser with the Palm OS Sony Clie TH55 PDA (tablet design, 320 x 480 screen). The TH55 had built-in WiFi, and could be easily tethered to a bluetooth phone. NetFront 3.1 did an excellent job displaying most full internet pages from that era, supported CSS, and supported most other 2004 era HTML standards. Occasionally, the Clie would run out of available memory when displaying a very large page, but fortunately most 2004 era pages would display fine. NetFront also had multiple display mode settings which allowed you to customize the page to your liking. Based on my positive experience with NetFront 3.1 on the Clie, I purchased NetFront 3.1 (2004), 3.2 (2005), 3.3 (2006) for WM, and am now experimenting with NetFront 3.5 Concept on WM. With all versions of NetFront, then current full internet pages were displayed properly, and the mobile web sites displayed fine as well (due to the variety of settings available). In 2006, using NetFront 3.3 on WM, I frequently viewed the full internet secure banking site for my checking account including images of canceled checks, and the desktop version of my credit card bank without any problems. NetFront 3.3 supported all required HTML formats, and security protocols. No doubt, Mobile Safari does an excellent job displaying full internet pages if they are multiple columns sites such as the NYT. Mobile Safari does have a problem displaying some single column internet pages, such as Craigslist, with a font size that is easy to read. Craigslist, and many other single column pages, are unreadable in portrait mode, and barely readable in landscape mode when using the double tap zoom in Mobile Safari. The double tap zoom in Mobile Safari does not increase the font size to a comfortable reading level (at least for me) on many single column pages. Sure you can use the daunted pinch zoom to enlarge the text to a comfortable reading level, but you now must horizontally scroll to read each line which get irritating after about two lines. Pinch zoom in Mobile Safari does not reflow the text. Although scrolling, and panning look cool in a demo, I use the mobile web the majority of time even when using full internet browsers such as NetFront, Opera Mini, Mobile Safari etc. on any device with < 7" screen (the 7" screen Archos 705 using Opera is the first mobile device that I prefer viewing the full internet rather than the mobile web). Panning is just another name for horizontal scrolling which gets old very quickly for me. If you enjoy it, fine. iPhone specific web pages, which are web pages designed to require minimal or no horizontal scrolling, are one of the popular trends on the web now. If using a small window on your mobile device to scroll, and pan around a large full desktop web page is so great in actual daily use, why the rush to develop mobile sites that display without all the panning, and with reduced vertical scrolling? I much prefer the mobile NYTimes site to the full site on my mobile devices with < 7" screen. There was a recent excellent article in the NYTimes about the move to vertical websites (no horizontal scrolling) for mobile devices. I did not include a link since the link may change; however, a search for vertical web on the NYTimes site should easily locate the article. Although Mobile Safari is fine for iPhone specific mobile pages that eliminate panning, Mobile Safari does have a problem with some generic mobile pages which are single column by nature. In some cases, you must horizontally scroll to read each line when zoomed to a comfortable reading font size. The single column problem is evident with the much publicized HTML email with the iPhone/touch. If you receive a single column HTML email (yes they do exist, I have received several from tech related companies),chances are you will be horizontally scrolling to read each line. Ironically, the much maligned Pocket IE is one of the best browsers for viewing the generic mobile web. Pocket IE should be updated; however, it does render the generic mobile web better than most. If the webmasters of the single column page websites add a Viewport metatag to the head of the webpage, the iPhone/touch will render fewer words per line, and the user can then view the page without the dreaded horizontal scrolling. I have added the Viewport metatag to my sites so iPhone/touch users can view the pages without horizontal scrolling. Unfortunately, many of the single column pages will not have the Viewport metatag added. I intentionally avoid using the the latest bells and whistles on my pages because I am a gadget geek, and want just about any user with a mobile device to be able to view the pages. I find it a bit ironic that many gadget related sites use the latest and greatest HTML formatting which results in many mobile devices having difficulty displaying a site dedicated to mobile devices. I have also used Opera Mini extensively on my WM devices. I have found Opera Mini to be the equal of Mobile Safari for viewing the full web (particularly on a 4" VGA screen), and much better than Mobile Safari for many single column pages. Opera Mini has a mobile view option which causes the text to reflow, and results in single column pages displaying properly at your desired text size without horizontal scrolling. Compared to the browser that was included with most mobile devices, Mobile Safari is indeed revolutionary. Compared to NetFront, and other capable mobile browsers which were available before the iPhone, Mobile Safari is at best evolutionary for the full web (loads a bit faster, a bit smoother etc.), and a big step in the wrong direction for displaying many single column pages which the other full internet browsers can display fine. Overall, Mobile Safari is an excellent browser; however, it is not perfect, and there are other very capable full internet browsers available. This post reflects my opinion based on extensive use of Mobile Safari (iPod touch), NetFront (WM), and Opera Mini (WM). I have yet to see a mainstream review which mentioned the problem Mobile Safari can have with single column webpages, such as Craigslist, or with single column HTML email. Do the reviewers visit pages other than the pages Apple's CEO visits during the demo, or are they so overtaken by the Reality Distortion Field that they do not realize required horizontal scrolling to read each line on some single column pages is indeed a major flaw? Your opinion, and browser needs may be different, I respect that.

selkiedee
selkiedee

Since Apple has released an SDK for the iphone, I'm sure you'll probably see tethering and voice command apps, as well as tons of others. My IT Director asked me to purchase an iPhone because faculty who are purchasing them would need support, and since I'm the Support Manager here, as well as the gadget queen, it made perfect sense. The thing I like BEST about the iphone, is the keyboard! Since, I have arthritis in my thumbs, no doubt aggravated by using a Blackberry for so many years, the lightness of the pressure you need to use on the touch keyboard makes typing relatively painless, which is not the case in using a BB, or a regular keyboard, for that matter. I imap my mail, and there is a program I can use to sync my calendar; unfortunately, I need to sync with my computer, and not via wireless. But, apparently that's going to be resolved with the new iphone. Anyway, I love my iPhone, which I've had for a year, now. As far as AT&T goes, their coverage is much better than the Nextel and Sprint coverage we had in our previous BBs, in our area, for the most part. By the way, MacAlly was supposed to come out with their BTKeyMini keyboard for the iphone, but it doesn't seem to be out, yet.

anogee
anogee

I've never seen anyone mention this. But of course I want my music on my new 16G Iphone 3G. But I don't want to have my music collection on my office computer, even though that's of course where I want to sync. I suppose could solve through MobileMe but that's another $100 per year onto the cost..... My old WindowsMobile PDA was happy syncing to 2 computers.

cgoodric
cgoodric

I've had the thing for 10 days and I have yet to see a landscape keyboard on any of the apps. It's funny how the iPod Touch has one though ...

cyberdragon666
cyberdragon666

landscape keyboard is the main reason I do not have an iPhone. The first version only had it in one or two applications. And the iPhone 3G does NOT have it in the applications that I think it should. Main one, text messaging. The number one app that most people will type the most only has a portrait keyboard. I have tried and tried to accept the keyboard in the iPhone but it is difficult, especially in portrait mode. If it was available in ALL applications I would probably switch. Then the keyboard would be large enough to make less errors.

rob
rob

He meant that he wanted a physical, sliding keyboard, kind of like an XV6800 has. His whole beef with the keyboard is that it's on-screen keyboard only.

LurkeyLou
LurkeyLou

I bought one of the first Macs (128k RAM). Less than a year later...Apple came out with the "FatMac," 4 times the RAM for the same price with NO upgrade to the original buyers! When the iPod came out, same story: overpriced and underpowered. Less than a year later...more storage for less money. iPhone is just a continuation of Apple's corporate arrogance. 1) Make an item and market it as oh-so-cool. 2) Price it high because it is so cool (and to give room for the eventual price cuts). 3) Don't worry that it's underpowered. In fact, that's a good thing from Apple's perspective as it makes future new-and-improved models easier to develop. 4) Sell to the I-gotta-be-the-first-on-my-block-to-own-this-cool-gadget suckers. 5) Once their money is taken, bring out the more realistically usable model at about the same price as the original underpowered gadget. 6) Within a year, bring out the not-quite-but-almost-price-competitive model. Other companies do this too, but Apple has raised it to a high art form. They intentionally do not put their best product forward at the best price. Instead, they get TOP dollar for handicapped products because they found out that, with a little marketing, people will pay a "cool premium." And Apple does do cool very well.

davidjsl
davidjsl

I like you...you can F*** my sister...lol Absolutely Right, as I stated before, generally speaking, people wasted good energy on useless acts (actions). Who you are is what you do. So who are you really, people? Helping others is one thing. Expelling useless hot air is another. Stop wasting your few moment of life. And a wise man once said nothing. Peace & Love

rusty.williams
rusty.williams

When that days comes I'll give it another chance...

dcolbert
dcolbert

I've got an XV6800. I think the iPhone would lose its hip aesthetics and thin profile if you added a keyboard. I think that is a user demographics thing. My employee who has an iPhone has become very proficient at tapping out on the on screen keyboard, so it is probably a generational thing, as well. I still prefer a good old Atari style joystick to a D-pad, for example. But the lack of keyboard is one iPhone killer for me, as well.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

I'd like a hardware keyboard. I'd be willing to settle for a slightly thicker iPhone in order to get it.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

"Once their money is taken, bring out the more realistically usable model ... they get TOP dollar for handicapped products ..." I don't think they roll out intentionally limited hardware. I definitely think they roll it out while they already have upgrade plans on the drawing boards. Why let potential development problems delay going to market when there are suckers who will buy the product regardless of the current or eventual feature set? As you noted, Apple isn't the only company to do this. Like Madonna, their greatest talent is self-promotion.

cyberdragon666
cyberdragon666

Maybe it's part of the cool factor but Apple usually blows everything away on the market when they come out with something new. Every single piece of equipment I have had from them has outlasted any Wintel based product by multiples of years(ex. my favorite Mac at the moment is almost ten years old and I have no current plans to replace it). All the way back to my first Mac 512k I have been able to use that piece of equipment for years upon years before I needed to upgrade it. I have never had a WinTel machine that lasted more than 3 years. Technology always advances. Memory is one of the biggest examples. It seems like almost month to month there are drastic price drops. Memory pricing is one of the major components in an iPod.

dcolbert
dcolbert

"Are you just trying to prove you're a geek, or (are you) just dumb? Your replies are merely the ramblings of a person seeking attention". Which all may be true, but at least those replies are coherent without the need for major editing. Just a suggestion, but if you can't spell or form a complete sentance, maybe you shouldn't call your target "dumb".

jwebfoot2togo
jwebfoot2togo

Are you just trying to prove your a geek? Or just dumb? Your replies a merely ramblings of a person seeking attention!!

dcolbert
dcolbert

I *like* that. Very Tao.

WhoCare$
WhoCare$

I agree 100% on the keyboard thing. It?s not easy to type accurately or quickly on any onscreen keyboard available on any mobile device. You constantly hit other key on the screen have to be correcting that and God for bids if you have big hands (which I don?t) forget it.

LurkeyLou
LurkeyLou

The 512k Mac WAS a usable computer. BUT...the 512k Mac was NOT what Apple introduced first, was it? That's right. It was the 128k Mac that I bought that was the first and therefore not-quite-ready-for-market product! When the 512k "Fat Mac" came out, there was NO upgrade path and no discount on a 512k for the ORIGINAL, Loyal Suckers...I mean, customers. I had to upgrade my 128k to 512k myself, without any Apple assistance. I even had to...GASP! "void my warranty" by cracking open the case! YOU bought version 2! That is a great time to buy Apple products, if one is so inclined! You made my point. Thank you. Just don't buy Apple ANYTHING, version 1.0! ...Even if it IS cool. Version 2 will be cool, too, AND usable!)

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