Software

Stop being duped by the 3D scam

The entertainment and electronics industries keep trying to push 3D on consumers, even though a lot of smart people have caught on to the fact that it's a scam. It's time to stop the madness.

This was originally published on April 23, but we're republishing it at the end of the year since it was one of TechRepublic's most-read articles of 2011. Since this was first published, the 3D movement has indeed begun to lose momentum.

Last Friday, I departed from my normal business technology beat to talk about the geek entertainment event Game of Thrones. This week I'm going to plug into our Geekend theme again, but this time the topic is something more nefarious -- the entertainment industry's misguided scam of the public.

The 3D gimmick has sadly infiltrated movies and television and is now threatening to infect video games and smartphones as well. There's only one reason why the entertainment industry keeps relentlessly pushing this at consumers -- it's a transparent attempt to bleed more money out of people. And, while a lot of consumers have caught on to the scam, not everyone is doing enough to stop it.

3D is definitely NOT about innovation, as the industry would like you to believe. In fact, adding the current 3D effects to a movie or video of any kind subtracts from the picture. It muddies the colors and unsharpens the images, and it has to slow down the action shots because it makes people sick if things go too fast in 3D. In fact, optometrists estimate that up to 25% of people get headaches or nausea from simply watching 3D at all.

Photo credit: iStockphoto.com/4FR

My first hint at the 3D scam was in October 2009 when Toy Story and Toy Story 2 were re-released in the theaters as 3D movies. My kids were excited to see Toy Story on the big screen for the first time so we gladly ponied up the extra money to see the 3D version of the double feature. We weren't very far into the first movie before I realized that the quality of the colors and images were actually worse in 3D. That was a big disappointment. Even my kids said that the 3D wasn't as exciting as they thought it would be. There went an extra $24 down the drain ($3 extra for 3D for four people for two movies).

Of course, the Toy Story movies were standard 2D movies that were converted to 3D (which is actually the way most "3D" movies are still handled). So, what about movies that are natively shot with special 3D cameras, such as Avatar? I'll admit that when I first saw Avatar in the theaters I was impressed at how well it wove in the 3D effects. But, my admiration wore off once I saw it on Blu-ray on a 240Hz LED TV and quickly realized that all of the colors and action shots suddenly came to life and really popped off the screen. That's when it fully dawned on me what a horrible scam 3D really is. They are making us pay more money for a gimmicky, inferior experience. Sure, there are a few neat moments in most 3D movies, but the novelty wears very off quickly and it's certainly not worth the trade-off in picture quality or action sequences.

I had started to see this coming a little sooner, and I should have pounced on it. Back at the 2009 Consumer Electronics Show, I was dazzled by the new LED TVs that Samsung showed off at its big press conference. The images were so sharp and the colors were so bright that the picture almost felt three dimensional. Plus the TV themselves were amazingly thin.

The next year, at CES 2010, I was surprised to see all of the TV manufacturers including Samsung pushing TVs with 3D glasses. I immediately felt like this was a step backward. I didn't want to mess around with watching TV with 3D glasses. I wanted to see more super thin TVs with amazing pictures (at even better prices) like the ones I had seen the year before. After consumers rejected 3D TVs in 2010, the companies tried to come back at CES 2011 and pitch "no glasses" 3D. I wanted to shake my head and do a face-palm every time one of these electronics vendors mentioned 3D.

This is a bad detour for the entertainment and electronics industries, and they stubbornly refuse to let it die. In fact, they keep trying to push 3D on us, since many of these new products have been in planning for a year or two (before consumers started catching on to the 3D scam). The movie industry and movie theaters try to force us to only be able to watch some of their top movies in 3D (and pay extra for it). TV makers are forcing 3D into all of their new top-of-the-line LED TVs (and trying to make us to pay extra for it). Content companies are now making their Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Copy bundles include 3D discs (and trying to make us pay extra for it). Game companies such as Nintendo are integrating gimmicky 3D into their new systems. Mobile computing vendors such as HTC and LG are even trying to put 3D into their smartphones and tablets.

There's only one way to stop the madness. Avoid 3D whenever possible.

This is a bad experiment that the industry is forcing consumers to subsidize. And since they can't create a better product, they've simply latched on to 3D as a marketing ploy that the entertainment and electronics industries can use to trick people into thinking that they are getting a superior experience. It's only working because just enough people are falling for the scam to keep it alive.

A lot of smart people have already sniffed this out and are avoiding 3D entertainment. It's time for the rest of the public to reject 3D and stop being cheated.

It's not that we don't want innovation in real life imaging. Of course, we do. We just want real innovation, and don't want to pay for badly-overpriced gimmicks and half-baked experiments.

Also read

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

129 comments
John K.R.
John K.R.

I never understood what was so special about 3D. Yes it is fun for the first couple minutes or so but after a while it starts to mildly strain my eyes and just isn't pretty to look at anymore. The picture's much better without 3D and who really wants to wear those glasses? Even the new 3DS from Nintendo looks like crap and strains my eyes after only a few minutes. It's innovation done poorly that they're still trying to sell regardless of it's quality.

garyoa1
garyoa1

Most folks don't realize it's not exactly new technology. It was tried in the 50's. Yes, 1950's. There were 3d movies on tv. Didn't need a special tv. Just the free cardboard glasses that came in the newspapers to hype it.

RonCJK
RonCJK

My wife and I avoid all 3D movies and believe it's just a waste of money. I'm going to spend the money on upgrading to Blu-ray at Home instead and enjoy the movies the best way possible.

Roc Riz
Roc Riz

This technology is so old, it's not funny. When I first viewed a 3D TV at Best Buy, I described it to the salesperson as a big Viewmaster. You know, the viewer you used as a kid to look at those scenic places in 3D. And THAT'S been around for 65, count 'em 65 years! Now they are trying to tout it as something new. Well, I have been saying that it's the same fecal matter, painted a different color.

robo_dev
robo_dev

Nintendo now has the 3DS portable gaming console, so it's 'game over' for 2D. Just as Stereo replaced Mono, Color replaced Black and White, and Compact Discs replaced Vinyl and Tape, so will 3D.

cmiller5400
cmiller5400

I have motion sickness and even watching a HD show sometimes is enough to get my stomach churning. I'm a salesman's worst nightmare; I know what I want (and how much to pay for it :D ) and I refuse to pay for gimmicks or features I don't need. I haven't been to the movie theater in years (WAY to expensive, $15 for a large popcorn and soda? You got to be kidding me!! It cost you all of 50 cents to make it!); I'll wait till it comes out on Redbox, on-demand or buy it on DVD if it is a movie that I'd watch over again. Speaking of that, I guess it's time to upgrade my TV from a 13" CRT now... Guess I'm too cheap since it hasn't broken yet :p

JCitizen
JCitizen

that was 3D without any glasses at all. All that is needed is a TV that works at a 120Mhz scan rate, and the images were at least as good as the old parlor devices. In fact the image was from an old hand colored Japanese photo used on such devices from the late 1800's. 3D has been around for almost 200 years, and is never going away, no matter how many whiners complain about it.

wdewey@cityofsalem.net
wdewey@cityofsalem.net

The 3D of the 1950's used colors to create the effect so the picture was essentially monochrome. The current 3D used in theaters uses polarized lenses so you can see color. It's a much better experience. Bill

dartboucher
dartboucher

Roc Riz you are DIZ ! . The 3D TV in My Living Room IS True 3D ! just watch the Cirque du Soleil "Ascent of Man' Blu-Ray ($14, Amazon), and THEN tell me it is Stereoscope. . You couldn't be more Wrong ! When they swoop down towards you it is No Stereoscope, I assure you, the Movement and Action is as Real as can Be ! . Now on some movies, different depths of say the Forest in Avatar "seem" like Stereoscope, ad they are different distances away, but not in those Flying Scenes they aren't ! The depth of Field is REAL, no layered images about it as they swoop and soar around the hanging mountains and trees. . See you have +16 Votes. LOL ! . That is 16 people that haven't seen whata Real 3D TV can do. . It is important to know you can't mix and match equipment. I have all Vizio ... TV, Blu-Ray, anad Active Glasses. Another reviwer that experienced the same as I had all Panasonic. haven't rum into One 3D Blu_Ray or HBO on Demand movie that didn't work. And though Vizio says it will work with regular 3D Glasses, that is Not true. You Must have the Active Glasses, paired to the TV or DVD Player, and All pieces (Including the HDMI Cable), Must be 3D. . But Folks, this stuff is as real as If you are in it, at least in My Living Room ! . Diz here has it ALL Wrong ! . Douglas Boucher Summa cum Laude IS, University of Texas

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

You are at least 65 years old. How's the eyesight? :-)

P K Pal
P K Pal

Old wine in a new Bottle - only the bottle is new because of current 'development'. Of course, you now have the accompanying 'sound' in 7.1 or even 9.1 for enhancement and this is pure pleasure. If done well, excellent! If not, loads of headaches - not to forget the time, effort and the monies wasted. However, this would look good only on a big screen and not on the 60" 3D 1080p TV screen. The 'Sellers' are there to entice you with all gimmickries but the 'Buyers' have to be aware and not taken for a ride by hyper and over advertising (s)kill of the vendors.

SKDTech
SKDTech

Funny, everything I have seen about the 3DS shows that the 3D gimmick lasts for all of a day and then it is turned off and forgotten about by most. The real market for 3D, if there is one, is in console and PC gaming. Even there most are completely willing to go without.

tbrown
tbrown

I think there will be some backlash robo, I don't think 3D (at least not in its current iteration) will be to 2D what color was to black and white. The issue is that 3D isn't an actual organic experience, but a highly flawed method of tricking your eyes into thinking they're viewing tangible 3 dimensional objects. Until they provide a more natural experience, I don't think it will be a game changer.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Who says you have to buy over-priced and popcorn and watered down sodsa? Except once for my niece and nephew, I've never bought that garbage. As for queeziness, you may have issues but IU think most don't. Gimmicks? Knowing what will come up in a scene before it happens is bad. at least 3D adds something to a movie.

DHOLYER
DHOLYER

HDTV's mostly now have HDMI or VGA inputs, or 22" and 32" LCD monitor screens. I got my 22" with stereo sound and Webcam for under $200 3 years ago. And they make HDTV's as big as 73" retail. And in Japan they are working on Ultra HD and that is four times the detail as HD. And that is as good as your local 70mm theater. And with Dolby 7.1 the sound is getting close also. In 25 years you may not even need to go to the local IMAX. That is if you can afford a home with that big of a room. And the projector may even fit in your pocket next to your cell phone if they are not implanted chips by then.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I go to the drive-in. We've got The Big Mo eight miles away. $7/adult, 3$/child. Gets first-run moves on two (soon to be three!) screens. Bring your own food and drinks, although they would prefer you buy from the concession stand. The hot dogs are good. The pickles are awesome. If I want to drive a few miles further, there's the 25 Drive-in in Greenwood. $5 per person, but $8 to bring in your own food. I've been for the movies, but have never eaten there. I'm told by the locals that the food from their restaurant is to die for, and the prices are reasonable. Might be a bit of a drive for you, though...

redave
redave

The manufacturing cost between a 3D TV and TV in 2D is ZERO $$$. The reason is the only difference between the two sets is the microcode that controls the TV screen. It is a freebie. There is an engineering cost, but divided amoung millions of TV's the cost is negligible. Youe are also ignoring the market that all the BIG Boys are looking at: SPORTS. Seeing a soccor ball curve around an oppenent - Priceless. Being able to tell the difference between a curve ball and a fast ball - Priceless. Being able to see to whom a football is being passed to, or seeing how close a receiver 's hand are to the ball Priceless. Is it real life NO!!, but it is better than 2D.

mmmna
mmmna

My issues are probably already stated, but here goes a list of why I personally won't jump on the bandwagon for a LONNGG time. 1] I want 3d without needing electric power at the glasses. No batteries, no cords, no wireless. In other words, PASSIVE. I already hate the monthly expenses of supplying AAA and AA batteries for so many other electronic devices, so these viewing glasses get the same disdain. Cords? I don't want to untangle cords, I don't want to trip over cords. ZERO cords. Zero helmets, zero electronic contacts, just say no to electrical viewing devices. 2] I do not want to purchase a specific model of 3D viewer (TV/Monitor/Smartphone) only to find I'm the proud owner of 'HD DVD Revisited' or another 'SQ Quadrophinic' audio system. Too many competing (and, from what I see, mostly incompatible) systems. ONE design is about all I want - the ONE design which meets all my personal needs. 3] I already have a collection of 45 degree polarized 'glasses' which I have collected; I get them from those cinemas which charge extra for the movie - I figure that I've purchased them. 4] I wonder if all 3D formats/designs willwork on people with Amblyopia, so that issue might be one sword to cut the market down. I have severe Amblyopia, and the 45 degree polarized stuff DOES work for me. 5] 'Yet Another Forced Obsolescence'? I STILL have 3 analog TVs. My satellite service does not provide subscription HD content. Will 3D content obsolete my current HiDef LCD TV? It could, and I won't write off the loss. There once was a day when parents gave their first married child the family washer, because appliances lasted so long and were so serviceable. I have never told anyone that I wanted to see my appliances obsoleted, and I never will say as much.

jhowell
jhowell

I was reluctant to buy a 3D TV because I thought it was a scam. However, a local store was having a sale on the LED TV I wanted while I was in the midst of my family room revamp. It is 3D, but was not really significantly more expensive than the 2D version, and came with a decent Bluray player. So in the past 4 months, I've used the 3D glasses exactly once: to watch 1 period of a playoff hockey game in "simulated 3D". It actually kind of added a "new dimension" to the experience (LOL).

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

So...it's not a scam it's just being done badly? Isn't that the point of the article. It's bad quality at a premium price? That sounds like a scam. But you know, everyone is entitled to their opinion, and you don't think it's a scam and that's fine. BTW, can I interest you in some quality muffler bearings? Yes, they are expensive, but these are way better than the older generation muffler bearings. ;-)

indorock
indorock

Just because you think a technology is not of enough added value to you or not mature enough doesn't mean it 's automatically a scam, and doesn't mean we're being "duped". We can see with our own eyes what it looks like and we can decide whether we find it adds value to our entertainment or not, and we can decide for ourselves whether or not to see 3D films in the future. Or, if you are a total reactionary, you simply stay the fuck away from 3D films altogether and you'll never know if you'd like it or hate it. A scam is an act of someone offering something that you simply won't get. The studios offer you the illusion of 3 dimensions, that's more or less what we get. It has a long long way to go but it's a lot better than it used to be. Whether it will ever be GREAT is entirely debatable, but whether or not it's a scam is NOT.

JCitizen
JCitizen

waiting for 3D without the glasses, which is already on 3DS devices. The SMART people are buying the right equipment and movies that display TRUE 3D. Just because a lot of folks don't think 3D is worth it, despite good quality; doesn't mean folks who do are stupid! I don't get the issues that people complain about - but then I got the right equipment. If you want a really good 3D experience - Consumer Reports recommends the Panasonic Viera TH-50PZ700U for the best 3D experience; but I've not paid a penny more for my equipment than any of the other average systems put together. If you shop smart you can get away with it, and it is really a no-brainer, if the cost is close to the same as other setups. The only extra expense, was the 100 dollars or so I paid for a set of four shutter glasses for my 61" DLP set. My particular arrangement works nearly as flawlessly as the Panasonic sets, with only one artifact in scenes with bright back grounds. I don't see any of the other problems associated with 3D, because I pay attention to CNET, CU, and Amazon user reviews. For so much return on so little investment, I think a person could be STUPID for NOT buying into 3D! The kids that watch and enjoy my entertainment heartily disagree with this article's assessment!

Jaqui
Jaqui

in 1986 at the Expo here in Vancouver, there was a Discovery BC pavilion. had a theater in it, 90 foot tall screen by 180 feet wide, floor to ceiling and wall to wall. curved to follow the wall of the theater. The 20 minute show they put on it could induce vertigo in several scenes. a very memorable short for that. and it was NOT a 3D film. since I don't have any interest in the poor programming being offered by the networks, I'm not going to be buying no 3d tv unit. and no way will I spend money going to the theater to see a bad movie.

bmeyers
bmeyers

Real innovation and invention will come soon enough. Jason is right on the money with the view (pardon the pun), that 3D is a scam. It's worse. It's classic fraud. Less than %20 of most "3D" features brought to us from Hollywood actually contain shots in 3D. Until I get a holographic 3D "tank" I can put in my living room, I'll just say no to 3D.

Adrian_curiosu
Adrian_curiosu

I've seen a documentary about how the film distributors protect their business against copyright violations. The 3D cinemas were presented as a big step ahead: they don't need to watch the people in the cinema and catch those using camcorders at film premieres, because the recorded images are blurry. I believe this is the main reason. Also, it allows the filmmakers to introduce more video effects, thus covering the lack of intrinsic artistic quality of most movies. Sad, really.

sboverie
sboverie

3D is not a scam, it is just being done badly. One problem is that producers and directors are used to working in 2D and changing to 3D requires different composition and filming. This problem is similar to the change from B&W to color, the directors were using shading to set the drama in B&W and using the same techniques in color did not work as well. Even further back, the change from silent films to sound tracks on film changed the way the audience percieved the actors. Some silent film actors that were wildly popular could not make the change to sound because their voices did not fit the sound expected by the audience. 3D done well can be a very immersive experience, 3D done badly will cause eyestrain and headaches. There are also the 3D gimmicks such as pointing an object at the audience that was lampooned by Second City Television many times. It would be better to point to the successful 3D movies and games than to brand the whole thing as a scam. It will take time for the industry to work out better ways to view 3D and that is happening now. What the 3D movie industry needs is a director with the caliber of Hitchcock to craft the scenes to have depth that pulls the audience into the film combined with technology that gives the audience feeling that they are viewing a natural form of 3D.

Dr. Tarr
Dr. Tarr

... perhaps less bad? The problem with the polarized images is that unless you can keep your head perfectly vertical, and the glasses parallel to the screen you introduce additional errors into what is already a half quality image. I saw several movies (including Avatar and the new Tron) on the big screen, in 3D and 2D, each time I had a headache in less than 15 minutes of 3D viewing. The theater management was kind enough to allow me to watch the movies in 2D, and all had better image quality, and no headache. One of these days we will have the "tri-dee tank" system that the science fiction writers predicted, something akin to holography, or maybe a star trek like holo deck where we can see the movie like actors on a stage, without the use of glasses and their attendant problems, but I, for one, ain't holing my breath waiting

GrizzledGeezer
GrizzledGeezer

You don't know what you're talking about. Ever since Dr Land invented sheet-polarizing material in the 30s, all but a literal handful of 3D films have used polarized projection and viewing. The red/green or red/blue glasses have been limited mostly to comic books.

JCitizen
JCitizen

you can mix and match, but it is easier to take out the rocket science and go to TRU3D.com and select your devices there. That site takes the guess work out of it. To the newbies in 3D, though; they can get into trouble without at least taking your advice.

JCitizen
JCitizen

It looks pretty good on my 61" LED DLP! Maybe I'm just too easy to please. :)

Dampflok
Dampflok

As the proud owner of a couple of 19th century stereoscopes and a stack of photos, some of which were taken pre 1900 by my grandfather, I can say that they were excellent producing crisp 3D images with just a little exaggeration. I have only watched one 3D film (on a TV) and watched nearly all of it without the glasses it was so bad.

Spitfire_Sysop
Spitfire_Sysop

Give it time. I've seen the 3DS and it looked to me like flat characters placed in a 3D diarama. I am not surprised. It's not a "scam" or "fraud" it's the first time a 3D screen without glasses has been sold in America. Do you remember the very first gameboy? We have come a long way right? Remember how the first one had that terrible contrast dial on the side? The screen would change brightness at different angles. When you put money in to a product it gives the manufacturer the ability to make a better mousetrap. The technology will mature and you will eat your hat.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

And this has what do do with 3D or scams?

JCitizen
JCitizen

They closed the only one we had, which was 75 miles away, just a few years ago. I imagine it takes one hell of a DLP projector to light up one of those now; because film movies are gone.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Good stuff, man. I get over there at least once a year. I can't believe a drive-in in the sticks runs first-run double-features, but somehow they do.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

I haven't seen one of those in years now. All of the ones here have been closed and sold to shopping Centers for the Land. ;) Col

JCitizen
JCitizen

and the point is, it didn't really cost you anymore than some comparable devices. At least that has been my experience.

mjc5
mjc5

Call it what you want, but manufacturers would just love for you to dump all your 2 year old HDTV stuff and buy the amazing wonderful 3-D TV's. Thier business model is to get you to buy something new every couple years. So they push 3-d. And while it might be an interesting effect, it really doesn't add all that much to the experience. 3-d is something that gets "rediscovered" every generation. People gawk, then the interest fades. So they are pushing hard this time, but many of us aren't buying. If they try to force it on us, I'll just find something else to watch, like my computer. Television being mostly about "The Jersey Shore" and infomercials these days.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Current methods of simulating 3D do not work without tricking two eyes into triangulating depth. Why the heck would a smart person buy into a technology implementation which doesn't actually provide the promissed 3D visual depth for them? It's kind of like saying parapalegics are stupid for not buying cars with the latest advancement in foot pedal technology isn't it?

jwhite
jwhite

Just because you tried to buy the best 3D setup currently offered for a reasonable price does not mean 3D is anything more than a gimmick. The fact that you mentioned the 3DS's "success" with 3D proves you don't have a clue. Why do most people turn off 3D on their 3DS's? Same reasons as always: eyestrain, framerate is half of non-3D, games look worse in 3D because it requires twice the processing power (and therefore the Dev's of the game have to make it up by reducing the shaders, resolution, etc when 3D mode is on), many people can't even PERCEIVE the 3D effect on the 3DS anyway... the list goes on! It's a gimmick on TV's and it's even more of a gimmick on 3DS's.

Pks29733steel
Pks29733steel

Aren't wasting their money or vision on 3D! Why buy a new tv, and have to buy 'glasses' to watch it? If 3D was so sucessful why hasn't evey movie since it's creation (3D) been made in 3D? Why, becuase it ruins the movie, makes viewers sick, costs more to produce and people don't want it.

jake.katz
jake.katz

If that was the 'flight' from the west coast to the east coast of Canada in 20 minutes - boy, do I remember that one. I was sick for at least an hour after that!

dartboucher
dartboucher

I have 3D in My Living Room, at No higher Expense than a Regular System, except for the Active Glasses, and it also is Internet capabl, can get Facebook, Netflix, AND HBO ON DEMAND 3D MOVIES ! . 3D Movies, by either my Cable Provider 9you need very high bandwidth), or from My 3D Blu_Ray Player (an $80 player that does everything a Regular Player doe, except it too can work off the Internet) . IS STUNNING ! . The 3D is Better than in the Theatres, Avatar from HBO on Demand had blow-Away Flying Scenes, and the Cirque du Soeil IMAX 3D Converted for Bl-Ray TV was omly $15 on Amazon, and just Plain Knocks Your Socks off ! . Now you can't Mix and Match pieces ... Another reviewer in here is doing great with his All-Panasonic System, and I am doing Great with my All-Vizio System, All Delivered by Amazon.com, Free Shipping, and NO Sales Tax ! . I save a Bunch of Money over Buying a regular Widescreen ata store, more than enough to get 4 pairs of Active Glasses (Vizio, of course, ALL must Match). . So, thou who thinks it is a Scam, thou art Dead Wrong ! . Sorry if it Didn't work for You !, MY Living Room is THE Place to be ! . Douglas boucher . Summa cum Laude IS University of Texas USAF electronics technician, Texas Instruments Precision calibration Technician, Ticketmaster Director of South Region IS, Owner: Computer Asssistants (Maui) .

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Less than 20%? according to who? You? Where's the proof? Links?

Jacqinabox
Jacqinabox

I agree. Avatar was was just Disney's Pocahontas without the singing and adding some left over props from Alien. Excellent recycling, dreadful film. As for the 3D experience, I had to switch every 20 mins or so from having my prescription glasses under the 3D glassess to viewing with the 3D glasses only. Most disconcerting. Glad it wasnt a good film that I had to concentrate on.

Hazydave
Hazydave

If you get the camera wearing the glasses, the video will be sharp. You would need to make a filter (or two, if you're trying to record in stereo with 3D camera or two standard cameras) from the glasses for the Dolby Labs process. For RealD, you need a good circular polarizer... if you have a polarizer for a modern camera, that's likely circular, and will get you one channel. The most effecive copy protection they have today is this phase tweaking thing on the audio. New and upgraded BD and maybe DVD players will mute the audio after 20 minutes, when they detect the CP signature.

MobyMud
MobyMud

All you need is a high quality polarizing filter to defeat this.

jonrosen
jonrosen

Generally when something is done poorly, AND they're trying to fleece the consumer for even more money, for it, it falls into 'scam' territory

peteloo
peteloo

I agree with Disagree. We should look at better ways to watch 3D rather than treating it as a scam. I would like to see 3D improved. There should be more content natively produced in 3D to catch up with the myriad of 3D 'hardware'. I wish the electronics industry could settle for a good 3D standard to help consumers avoid all the confusion.

SirWizard
SirWizard

Jason, et al: have you been to ordinary 2D movies lately, within say the past several decades? The amount of mindless drivel is astounding. Visually sharp, brightly colored, and fast but imbecilic action scenes with ridiculous plotlines are the standard. So be fair and don't hold the worst of 3D content to a higher standard than 2D content, which is mostly crap. And what about the commercial 2D television scam? Even the best movies are chopped into disjointed fragments, interrupted with ludicrous (if not intellectually offensive) sales pitches, and overlaid with station logos and moving advertisements. Where is your argument against the scam of hardware manufacturers trying to sell you newer 2D televisions? Where are your argument against the DVDs or Blu-rays that start with obnoxious commercials? Aren't those scams? Getting beyond a distaste for poorly made 3D content, why is high-quality 3D content a scam? A small minority or persons, and Jason Hiner's claims clearly indicate a minority, are 3D-media blind due to their physiological response or their eyes-to-cortex idiosyncrasies. But that is no more a scam than selling color televisions in a world where a minority suffer from some form of color blindness. Most of us have biologically robust 3D visual sensory systems and can take great delight in the immersive and informational aspects of quality 3D media. Leave us alone, without all the "scam" badmouthing. Are you 3D-blind but possess common sense? Then don't buy 3D media or attend 3D presentations! You have plenty of other options. Nobody holds a gun to your head and says you must see a re-jiggered phony-3D Toy Story if it will trigger a migraine, just as nobody force feeds you the chocolate that most enjoy but which is another common migraine trigger. Worse than 3D-blind (which sufferers can't help) is 3D-stupid. There's an information source called "The Internet" by which savvy shoppers educate themselves about the products and services for which they shop, and discerning 3D aficionados shop for and view quality 3D-source media. As with 2D content, the bulk of so-called 3D content is appalling to watch, for example, "The Lion King" in which a flat plane depicting a lion is at a different 3D distance from a flat plane depicting a meerkat. It is cost prohibitive, when not simply impossible, to re-render most 2D content into visually satisfying 3D. However, content created in 3D is beautiful to watch, for example, the family-fare animation, Cars 2. In my home, I delight in the 3D beauty of Avatar and Tron: Legacy, the story-line failings not withstanding. Perhaps better, the three fulltime 3D channels I receive on DirecTV provide beautiful, intriguing, and informative fare. Meanwhile, I await a Blu-ray release of the 3D version of Hitchcock's Dial M for Murder, which he shot in 3D. So cease and desist with the "scam" appellation for what I and a great many others enjoy. If you don't like it, don't buy it, and stop pushing technological hate-mongering.

JCitizen
JCitizen

I must admit that navigating the scam is difficult - even for the technically proficient; but if you do your homework, you can get 3D pretty cheap. My 61" LED DLP was already 3D ready - I bought four glasses in a set for sale, and a Panasonic low end BD 3D player, and I can attest that this medium is very entertaining. I didn't notice poor coloring, and very few artifacts in the movies I watch. I only buy true 3D movies - not 2D converted films. It would be silly to do that, when their is software to do that in you PC already. You can watch any movie converted to 3D with some of the better player software now. I've never done it, so I can't witness whether it is worth it or not. I would think it would be a good conversation piece, none-the-less! For those who are having problems matching their equipment in planning for 3D conversion go to TRU3D to research your choices. This will allay a LOT of the headaches in this difficult environment. I don't necessarily advocate any site for ordering the actual equipment, it is just that it is next to impossible trying to find the proper equation for these devices. I'm not an advertiser, and have absolutely no association with any industry what-so-ever. I'm just a happy camper with my old settup. You can get much better products now. And WAY CHEAPER TOO!! It doesn't hurt to swing by Consumer Reports to read the latest test articles for 3D equipment either; they are a little behind, but can still provide insight into your plans. [b](edited)[/b] Apparently TRU3D has been either bought out by Samsung or the store has thrown in their lot with them, as they no longer offer full information in mixing and matching various brands. It is a sad developement, because I was having a terrible time with this, until I learned from that original site how all this tech works. Going to forums just didn't do the trick, but apparently that will be the only choice now - good luck with that! Consumer Reports can help with some of this, but was still lacking information the last I checked - which was many months ago.

Tony Akin
Tony Akin

This is similar to audiophiles moving from mono to stereo. Early on, the push was simply to showcase the technology. The technology worked, but content producers felt compelled to make us listen to ping pong effects alternating between speakers. It took years, but once content providers (and consumers) got tired of the simple novelty, we finally started getting good content. Today, nobody expects anything other than stereo. Time will tell whether 3D survives, but if it does, it will have to win on content and a truly more satisfying experience - just as stereo finally did.

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

You say you disagree, it's not a scam, its "just being done badly". So, what is your deffinition of a scam...just curious ;-)

Kabaka
Kabaka

On Apr 22, 2011 @ 7:36 AM (PDT) sboverie@... posts - headed "DISAGREE" - "It would be better to point to the successful 3D movies and games ..." but sboverie@... points to nothing, while attempting to contradict an article with specific examples. Come on fella, It's time to put up or ...

borg_88
borg_88

This is well said. 3D is being done badly. You would think that after the 50 years that 3D has been around (yeah, I saw some of those 3D horror movies in the 1950's) that they could do away with those darned blue and red glasses! Finding another way to do 3D would be real innovation...

poppy007
poppy007

If you haven't seen a football or basketball game in 3D in your living room, you're missing out. You can actually see how the players are positioned on the line of scrimmage, in a way that lets you see the plays unfold in a totally immersive way. With basketball you can see bad calls, like when a player swipes at the ball, gets called for a foul and he never even made contact. I have played Bioshock 2, Crysis 2 and Mass Effect 2 on my PC which is night and day in the level of immersion. On the PS3 I have played GT5 and Batman in 3D, both of which add another layer of realism that you can't get any other way. We already have 7.1 DTS sound, 1080P visuals, 3D is the next frontier for more realistic movies, TV and games in the home. Obviously I am one of the VAST majority that don't suffer headaches when watching even after several hours!

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

A single display blasting out 3D really isn't going to do it. I want to turn my head left and right and see the scene unfolding around me if it's going to be more immersible than 2D. When the car rushes down the road, I want to look left and right and see guard rails rushing past, I want to look backwards and see cars and road disappearing behind me. Make the action take place on the front screen but results trace naturally above, below, beside and behind. And, do it in such a way that not wearing the headgear or lacking the second view point to measure depth results in a perfectly viewable 2D image. 3D TV has been trying since the sixties (I think I read that was the first go around for it). We may be better off to simply put that effort into immersion rooms or proper VR.

DHOLYER
DHOLYER

I should know personally that changing the way the brain thinks or sends thoughts can hurt. I had my skull split open exposing my brain. I thus lost all memory or as I phrased it I lost contact with the memory matrix my brain built chemically in the brain cortex. As I started to learn things, the little things like language and how to eat and have the food end up in my tummy not my lungs was easy and not painful, it could have been medicine that did not let me experience pains of re-educating my brain. 2 years after I got out of the year long hospital stay I started going to Collage to learn again how to program computers. In high school I had educated myself how to do this. In my second year I started getting massive pains in my head as I was reconnecting with my memorys of HP BASIC and Pascal . I also got pains as I recalled personal memory's. For 3 years I was digging through my head for memory's. After that I stopped mainly because a PET scan revealed why. It was a lack of blood to parts of the brain that needed to reactivate existing memory's in dormant chemical chains of memory's and the process of making chemical chain links to these memory's. I also got these pains as I learned to walk again, I had to train my brain to use a visual balance system since the the vestibular organs in my inner ears where damaged beyond repair. Much of my recover efforts were from my desires, the doctors just pointed me in the correct direction, and I desired to figure out ways to recover. Or I would have remained a Veg in bed as they expected.

dgalbreath
dgalbreath

At least the guy who wrote the article cited some examples. Put a list of your top 5 products for the technologies you mentioned.

gechurch
gechurch

I tend to agree with the author that 3D is a gimmick (I don't agree that it's a scam - I think that's too strong an assertion). I don't think your examples of moving to sound and then to colour are equivalent to the move to 3D. Introducing sound and colour were significant, undisputable steps forward. The same can't be said of 3D. As stated by the author the picture quality is worse. I also don't buy the argument that directors just aren't using the medium well enough. 3D has been around for decades. Do we really believe that the medium id great, its just that no director in the past twenty years has been able to get it right? And even if you do believe that, does it matter? The end result is normally a worse experience. It doesn't matter if it's a worse experiece because of the medium, or the director's inability to adapt... it's stil la worse experience. Personally, I'll continue to go along to the movies twice a year and will gladly watch something in 3D. I find it to be a gimmick, it looks cool in places but overall I find it detracts from the movie because I'm constantly aware of the fake effect.

Talon_MacDonald
Talon_MacDonald

I have not yet seen a successful 3D movie or Game. When you can point me to a Multiple projection unit that kicks a hologram out into a Tank, or even onto a table for viewing, THEN I will think 3D has progressed beyond the simple layering of today.. It sux. Period.

The Unknown IT Guy
The Unknown IT Guy

Can you really expect a difference in your viewing experience? The flat screen is the flat screen! There are multiple studies that have been made that 3D actually makes people sick, gives them head aches and may cause other issues for certain people. 3D is really a scam to lure people into thinking that they need to upgrade their video equipment again.

vyzzhor
vyzzhor

What they actually need to do is boost the gain on the 2D, before they apply 3D effect. Then everything will look normal, but 3D. Of course, if they want to learn this process, I'm happy to act as a consultant, for the appropriate fee... ;-)

majella_67
majella_67

Resident Evil AfterLife 3d is an excellent 3D movie.

SirWizard
SirWizard

3D porn. It was porn that gave VCRs the initial success that the large format video disc lacked. As usual, software sells hardware.

SirWizard
SirWizard

On DirecTV, ESPN 3D is channel 106.

DHOLYER
DHOLYER

I herd back around Valentine's Day that this summer pr fall ESPN is going to start a 3D channel. I can see it being good in football or soccer, oval stock car racing, I could have more fun buying a game. But I care less about that. But for some they may like it And I'd like to see 3D female bikini beach volleyball. A real test of if they are real or silicone.

GrizzledGeezer
GrizzledGeezer

"There are multiple 3D systems in use; only the primitive ones use H/V polarization." Actually, the original systems used 45/45 polarization -- tilting the head introduces less crosstalk. I've never had problems with 3D comics or movies. Guess I'm a "freak". In fairness, no one needs 3D. If it succeeds, it will be because of 3D sports TV. Football, soccer, basketball, lacrosse would all be more involving in 3D.

Hazydave
Hazydave

There are multiple 3D systems in use; only the primitive ones H/V polarization. The RealD system uses circular polarization, left for one eye, right for the other. The Dolby Labs system (forgot the name) uses color multiplexing -- the glasses get the right color bands to each eye. And of course, most home systems use time division multiplexing and LCD shutter glasses. There are certainly issues with all of these -- at the least, each eye gets only half the light it would have, viewing the same thing in 2D. But the head tilt problem is well solved in modern stereoscopic projections.

JCitizen
JCitizen

but then technology would never advance either, so at least some of us "dupes" are financing the future. HA!

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I tend to put money into a product because of what it can do not what future generations might be able to do. My obligation is not to sponsor corporate R&D costs or features released on a marketing schedual. That might be just me though.

Pks29733steel
Pks29733steel

Manufactures are pushing products (Sony Minidisc, Blueray, etc.) that really aren't better or a improvement of the first product. This 3D tv will turn out to be the '8-Track' of the '2,000's'!! We are going to replace our DVD libary with 3D DVD's? I don't think so. Remember manufactures we did that once with CD's (replacing software and hardware- LP's/Record Players to CD's / CD players) I doubt in these economic times everyone has the money to buy your new 3D tv. People will remember how quickly CD's were taken over by MP3's (why carry abunch of cd's -$10,$15 bucks a piece, batterier-they ran out fast spinning that cd and the volume) . I'll save my money (my 'tube' set looks fine, HDTV isn't needed since I have cable and no 'digital anntenae' scam either) and wait a year or two till they figure out what is going to be what!!

t.rohner
t.rohner

A good movie is a good movie, is a good movie. Be it 24, 48 bit RGB, or grayscale or even 3D. But be honest, do you want to see the Jerry Springer show in 3D, or at all? There seems to be a similarity to Denmark, here in Switzerland. The TV-programming is bull crap. (most of the programs are from Germany... the best of them are the tax funded ones, the commercially funded ones started to produce their own content, instead of showing cheap B-movies from the 70' and 80'... like when they started) When my trusty old CRT broke down, almost 10 years ago, after 10 years of service, i repaired it. (a 10$ spare part, a squirt of coolant spray, a degree in electronics and a Ham radio license...) Since then, i see those ads of flat screens, HD-flat screens and now 3D flat screens and even LED-screens. (we have real LED screens, but they need 10 kW for 384x240 pixels...) But all the time, the programming got worse. Do i really want to see this crap in HD, or even shell out the money for 3D? There will be good movies in 3D, but i see it more in the national geographic, or imax niche. A good director with good actors and a good plot doesn't need 3D. Heck, i could even read a book... and do the animation in my brain. (That's why my library was more expensive, than all the technical crutches, i could have bought as an early adopter...) ((I bought a CD player, when it was almost a month's salary for me back then, but i loved music. Still do.))

bill.andersen
bill.andersen

I really don't know about the rest of you but I am sick of all the scams like this one that companies have been getting away with for years. When all this digital stuff started I bought a Sony Minidisc Player/Recorder but guess what? They never produced any commercial discs with music to listen to so they fell on their butt with them but we were then stuck with a product that cost a lot of money for nothing. In more recent times they try to get us to buy Blueray players and recorders but guess what? I still don't see enough commercial product out there to justify spending the kind of money they want for these machines, so no thanks. Next is 3D and the same slow or non-existent product introduction, so again...no thanks! Also we have Android phones which go off on their own and start applications and network time which costs customers money for nothing they started themselves...more scamming and theft! I'm sorry I ever bought my Android phone. Oh and back on topic, I live in Denmark where the quality of programming is so poor that I gave my TV away, again my way of saying..No thanks! Great thing about money is that its highly portable...you can spend it anywhere and I'm sure if you really shop around you can find things to buy which are not a scam.

JCitizen
JCitizen

and it is completely up to snuff on current quality on 3D. I was needing a blu-ray anyway, and the price was actually cheaper than most regular players at the time. I got the glasses(4 of 'em) on a huge sale on Amazon for under 100 dollars. Now they come bundled with kits for WAY cheaper. What is 'forcing' it on you when you can actually buy bundled deals cheaper than ordinary devices just a year ago?

JCitizen
JCitizen

and my statement is hinged on the fact that the price comes with the equipment as standard now. Why avoid buying something that the kids or other family members would enjoy just because you don't like it. It literally cost nothing extra now. 3D blu-ray players are dropping rapidly in price, but are now bundled with the glasses when you buy the set. To me it is a no brainer, and I really enjoy the entertainment. I get the value myself. These moves look way better than an old parlor trick with the old card viewers from the 1800's. I can't help resenting the inference that we 3D enthusiasts are somehow stupid for buying into something that quite literally cost us not one penny more! And quite enjoyable to boot!

JCitizen
JCitizen

I paid less than the standard get up even with the glasses; my people LIKE it. I find it entertaining. Where is the loss in value there? Only people who hate it don't want it, but it costs nothing more to have it? I don't get the complaining. You DON"T HAVE TO WATCH IT if you don't like it or want to!!

JCitizen
JCitizen

Just go to TRU3D.com to mix and match - it really takes the headache outta the equipment selection process!! C= [b](edited)[/b] TRU3D has capitulated to the Samsung brand and is now almost worthless in this endeavor! Sorry for the misdirection, but things do change rapidly in this economy now!

dartboucher
dartboucher

My 3D works Great !, and the technology wasn't around til now. . You just gotta make sure All the Equipment is from the same Compny (including the Needed 3D Active Glasses, AND that the HDMI Cable from Player to TV is 3D capable too. . properly Done, this stuff is Stunning, and Makes the Movie ! . I hope All Movies come out in 3D now ! . Pks, You are Lost ! . Douglas Boucher Summa Cum Laude in IS University of Texas

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

realize that regardless of whether it's in high def or 3D, on CRT or LED or plasma or LCD, most of the programming is still crapola. Springsteen still said it best: "57 channels and nothing on."

Tord55
Tord55

It was Bell that hosted the show, with eight projectors set up in a circular building, and were told to hang on to the railing that ran across the hall, from side to side! We were told a lot of people had accidentally fallen while watching the show! The problem is the visual cues, especially from our peripherial vision - like when the height over the ground suddenly changing (as we see it on the screen - naturally it's the cameras that are lifted) or then the sea suddenly is leaning (the helicopter carrying the cameras is banking away. These don't agree with our sense of balance, so the brain trieds to figuree it out - for some of us the muscles just follow the command of the balance sensors in our inner ear, and stay rock steady, as long as the ground is intact, some use visual cues to a much greater extent, and fall, and yet others become dizzy as the brain can't really figure it out. I didn't get dizzy that time, but I am not a roller-coaster fan, as that really muddle my senses! Otherwise, totally agree about 3D TV - much lower resolution, at least as yet!

JCitizen
JCitizen

I wished I had a link, because that is not what I'm getting. The new LaserVue DLP has the same three DLP (dark chip) multi-projector, and I read it reduces vertical resolution also.

sharmaniac
sharmaniac

No, it doesn't. In the theaters, they usually use passive glasses systems, that do NOT halve the resolution. That only happens on passive TV sets. Active and multiprojector or Zscreen passive systems have full resolution.

JCitizen
JCitizen

like that in the theater robs half the vertical resolution to display the 3D affect. This is what I read in the tech journals anyway. You can buy a Vizio or LG 3D HDTV that features similar technology, except it isn't DLP projection tech like the theaters. From what I read, this makes little difference in the result. I agree that home systems are superior to theaters in that regard. I see very few problems with my setup, and it is pretty ancient now(2008).

JCitizen
JCitizen

for me to collect the film is that it was supposed to be the first film using the new high resolution digital CGI. I suppose I'm a sucker for anything that is an industrial first.

Shadetree Engineer
Shadetree Engineer

are always in homage to the visceral impact of 'Apocalypse Now'.

Shadetree Engineer
Shadetree Engineer

The only thing about Avatar that really stands out in my mind is how a God can actually exist in the physical world, with a globally spanning network and all creatures able to connect to each other. It's my thought that the entire story was written to support this, and if the Pocahontas story was used, it was only because the director needed a workable story to support the God he created.

igotsix
igotsix

You have to include Fern Gully in the list of Avatar predecessors: Humans are destroying a pristine environment. One human becomes one of the natives (He is shrunk to the size of a fairy). This change wins him over to the natives plight, etc.

mjc5
mjc5

I fell asleep about a quarter of the way through. Had a decent nap tho'.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

When the movie first came out I heard two extremely accurate descriptions: - Pocahontas with blue people - All the cool things from James Cameron's other movies included into one; military gear from Aliens, light-bright aliens from The Abyss. And that assault on the tree would be a mirror image of the beach storming in Full Metal Jacket if it had Ride of the Valkyries blasting over loud speakers; except that's Kubrick's work (was that Full Metal Jacker?.. can't remember now.. been a while).

nwallette
nwallette

I've never heard of it. Google searches aren't providing much. This new?

bpazolli
bpazolli

I think this is a far better example than the b/w to colour and silent to audio examples. If you've ever listen to those "stereoized" beatles recordings they sound horrible. For a while the industry tried to produce stuff that showcased the new technology with varying results. Yet the industry finally settled down after the initial gimick stage and started producing content that is now the standard. This was done without any real change in the underlying technology. 3D could go either way, but some of us enjoy the gimmick and will be happy to see it played out. Eventually I think we will move fully to 3D just because the profit motive for companies. Consumers want 3D and are willing to pay for it and I don't think that is going to change on a large level. The only question is will it be a vinyl to CD sort of change or a mono to stereo change. BTW I always thought the main motive for 3D was that it was harder for 'pirates' to copy as it is only distributed on bluray (which is meant to have better cp) and you can't exactly take a camera into the movies to copy it.

sboverie
sboverie

The author stated his opinion and I stated mine.

nwallette
nwallette

Traditionally, the author / director / producer (whatever) is in control of what is to be the focus of the story. This is true regardless of medium. Books describe objects and people, giving you relevant info and only providing enough background detail to give you a sense of the environment. Same with movies, music, plays, stand-up comedy, you name it. In a complete 3D environment, the view would have to change based on what you're looking at -- in the x, y, and z axis. This would be very difficult to do in live action, because of the need to capture all angles of all objects on-screen(?), and of course the sets would have to be 360 degrees around the viewer. Also, I'm going to assume actresses in dresses would be out of the question. In rendered worlds it would be easier, but how much time do you spend modeling items the viewer was never meant to examine so closely? The burden would be immense! It seems to me true 3D would really only be possible when you can feed a computer the objects in a scene, and it can visually create that environment in complete detail, in real-time, at a resolution high enough that our ability to discern flaws is below our threshold for suspension of disbelief. So, maybe still a gimmick for now.

CMBaylis
CMBaylis

As Neon rightly (to me, at least) states, the magic of 3D comes from being able to look at what I want to see - so looking at the desk rather than the lamp should allow me to see the desk in 3D - unfortunately, the director wants me to look at the lamp, so only the lamp is shown in focus and the desk is blurred - it is this, amongst other things, that causes the headaches - our eyes are constantly on the move taking in information and sending impulses to the brain to interpret - when we move from one object to another our eyes adjust focus automatically. 3D movies don't allow us to do that, so instead our eyes overwork to bring focus to something that can never be brought into focus. VR experiences are different - the interaction between the glasses and the 'environment' always ensures that whatever the glasses are virtually pointing at is in focus - shifting your eyes without turning your head produces the same result as a 3D movie - out of focus objects. The only way that 3D can ever be truly immersive is for the glasses to contain an optic reader to determine what you, the user, are looking at, and then through relevant logic processing bring that object into visual focus - a challenge considering the brains processing speed, and the speed that the eye can move from object to object. Personally, I love 3D for what it is at present - a richer, slightly flawed, visual experience that is far from maturity, but on an amazing journey over the years to come. Hey, but what do I know....?

Tord55
Tord55

I doff my hat to you, sir! Impressive, no qustion about it! I just suffered a traffic accident in 1990 that turned me into a cripple - the doctor said that 'You'll never drive a bus again', but I've now been doing it for close to 15 years. So while the road towards the old life is long and cumbersome, it also gives you a lot of new insights and experiences. I actually think my traumatic experience was good for me, even if I never again can go trekking. It made me a humbler, wiser person, quite different from the bitter me from before the accident, that kept me away from my job for eight years. I think a traumatic experience in life is good for you, too many, and you become no wiser! I would love to have two normal legs, but I can live well with what I've got!

Tord55
Tord55

Many movies from the 50's onward were widescreen movies, and 16:9 is not nearly as wide as they were. A projection machinist one learns that there have been hundreds of formats, but luckily, just a few are common, but 16:9 is not! Go see The Bridge on the River Kwai in a cinema, and then on a HDTV, and you see that the TV is much squarer than the movie - Patton is another one that xomes to mind. Presently 21:9 TVs are the 'in' thing, not 4K.

jwhite
jwhite

If you're watching non-widescreen movies and they're "squished", you don't know how to use your TV. Worst case scenario should be the movie's picture doesn't take up the whole screen, but it should still be proportionally correct with black bars at the sides. Therefore, you're not losing anything. Plus, if a significant portion of your home movie collection is not widescreen, well that's jsut a stupid choice! You should've been able to tell for many years now that the standard was going to be widescreen and you might as well see the whole image rather than pan & scan 4:3 bullcrap that we used to have to deal with.

Orodreth
Orodreth

Avatar got away with its 3D viewing because it was new. The scam part is forced path to 3D, just like the forced path to Wide screen. I like the large screens but never liked wide screen. Wide screen flatens the most movies not shot for wide screen. And wides screen doesn't add much more scenery. I dread the day when all HDTV are 3D unless they're true holographic images then I'd great.

My children, my friends and myself all enjoy 3D movies,I payed $700 for the 71" Mitsubishi 3D, and buy all the movies used, for $15 or less.I've yet to meet these people who get sick, but I feel for them. Out of the box th TV needed a contrast, edge, and brightness adjustments, but Avatar 3D on demand via Comcast was the best movie filmed in 3D

redave
redave

The standard movie timing is 24 FPS and broadcast TV is 60 FPS. That the timing in 3D is doubled to account for the alternating left eye, right eye viewing, so that each eye views at the same framerate as in 2D.

redave
redave

Considering that the standard timing is 24 FPS in movies and 60 FPS in broadcast TV. That the timing in 3D is doubled to account for the alternating left eye, right eye viewing, so that each eye views at the same framerate as in 2D. There is something "Wrong" with your math or your logic.

redave
redave

I can remember seeing my first color TV broadcast. A neighbor had bought a color TV and invited his neighbors, including my family, to see the Rose Bowl Parade. Everyone who watched was WOWED. WHY, we were not comparing the picture to real life, we were comparing it to B&W. For all of us, for the first time in our life, we got a glimpse of what seeing the Rose Bowl Parade in person was like. As for those that say 3D is not lifelike enough, watch an outdoor scene on your TV, then look outside and try to tell me the picture on your TV is just as good as what you see outside.

ejobrien
ejobrien

140/200 = 0.7 3/4 = 0.75 9/16 = 0.5625 Based on your FOV numbers, that should mean that 4/3 aspect ratio is much closer to normal vision than widescreen 16/9. It seems perfectly reasonable therefore to suggest that 4/3 (all other things being equal) actually would give you a more immersive experience than 16/9.

Tord55
Tord55

Snickering at people who get ill from flickering lights is just stupid, ignorant and very unmature! When I was young we looked at stereoscopic pictures, but now it is called 3D, which is a misnomer, as we don't have three eyes, thus elevation information is not that good with just two eyes. Computer-generated, or recorded, so called 3D can easily make a lot of us dizzy or sick, as the resolution is poor, the colours are poor, and the update frequency probably is low (just a guess, but quite possible), which for those with fast retinas is a problem - I got terrible headaches running certain games on my Risc-OS machine as they had a lower CRT update frequency than normally. 40Hz was just about where my eyes still tried to keep up, higher frequencies and I had no problem! We, the wife and I, have a few 3D films (you need glasses of the green&red type for those), non very impressive, as the colours are worse, as are the resolution, compared to the normal versions. If you have the modern type of 3D glasses, with Kerr-cell shutters, the TV has to be able to output images very fast (over 200Hz), to not be felt flickery by those with fast retinas. So if you have fast retinas your eyes try to keep up with the flickering light of the TV, or cinema - in a cinema normal frequency is 24 pictures per second, aka 24HZ, but if you're going stereoscopic (aka 3D), you need 48 - quite a tall order! I guess the movie companies cheat some way, or other, and then the flickering becomes worse, and those with fast retinas will get nasty headaches, just as with fluorescent tubes, which flicker a lot, but most people don't notice, but some do, due to their fast retinas trying to keep up with the flickering - the rest give up at once! Those with fast retinas develope headaches in fluorescent tube light, while the rest, like me, with sadly slow muscles in their eyes don't notice anything special! Just because I'm not affected doesn't mean I fully understand other's problems! Only a young oaf, who thinks he knows all, would be sacastic when someone tells about their wives problems. Get mature, kid, grow a beard, get a girl, and be a little bit civilized, PLEASE!

Asrugan
Asrugan

3D technology as it is presented today is functionally incompatible with the way we see and the way our brains process information. Fixed. To say 3D is incompatible with the way we see and function is to say you live in a 2D world. So, unless you live quite a ways from the rest of us (dimensionally), I'm betting that's not the case.

rciafardone@gmail.com
rciafardone@gmail.com

Dude, your pupils are round indeed, and each one INDIVIDUALLY provides a roughly round image with alone would fit better with a square screen. But most people have 2 eyes, positioned horizontally, the image the brain assembles from this 2 round samples is longer horizontally than it is vertically, and this not taking into account the obstacles that your own face provides like the nose. Specifically, humans have max FOV of 200?? horizontal - 140?? Vertical, and that's a rectangle.

Kabaka
Kabaka

"Color TV actually made older folks sick" Source(s) please.

OakvilleMyKey
OakvilleMyKey

I have seen many attempts at 3D and IMAX kicks all other technologies to the curb! IMAX was the 3D pioneer and they continue to put others to shame.

YetAnotherBob
YetAnotherBob

the problem is in timing. You don't consciously see a different timing in the frames when looking at a 3D movie, but the timing difference is still there. At a subconscious level, the neurons still have to deal with it. You see at the same time in real life, in a 3D movie your two eyes are seeing with a difference of a few milliseconds. This creates a jitter in the visual cortex. Your brain has to smooth it all out. More sensitive people will have trouble adjusting to the differences. This flicker can cause headaches, or even seizures in some people. It is a real physical problem. Increasing the frame rate up to over 400 FPS should solve the problem. But that would require the movie to double the bit rate and storage.

YetAnotherBob
YetAnotherBob

The early color TV's were very sensitive to color settings, and would drift over time. The color settings (done with a variable rheostat on the back of the set) did need frequent adjusting as the CRT aged. It wasn't the fault of the broadcasts, it was the sets. As the technology matured, things got better. Improved electron guns, better masks, transistors instead of tubes with less 'drift'. the list of improvements goes on and on. TV in 1980 was much better than in 1970, with crisper lines, better resolution. In turn, TV in 1970 was much better than color in 1960, which was fuzzy and often 'off color'. In fact, it was the late 1960's before TV shows were all broadcast in color. In the early 1960's, a black and white show appeared sharper than a color show on the same set. Progress. There is room for a lot of it in 3D. Maybe in 20 years or so.

ReadWryt (error)
ReadWryt (error)

Man was I ever disappointed with "The IMAX experience". Having seen REAL IMAX here in San Diego at the Reuben H. Fleet (Originator of the format known as OmniMax) I couldn't believe that shoving a screen into the faces of the audience and using a pair of 2K projectors to pull the aspect ratio closer to television was supposed to be anything like 70mm film projected on a huge screen. The "Screen Door" effect was appalling, and adding 3D to it as an afterthought is a second step backward. I will take 2D on a Sony 4K projector over ANY IMAX, 2 or 3D, any day of the week...

Tayvl
Tayvl

The first color broadcasts (I was there to see them) were really poor. The color appeared to be nearly all green or red tints, for one thing, and the clarity was muddy. I can understand if someone got a headache watching it, although I don't remember anyone in our family getting headaches. For one thing, people will sit and watch new technology even if it's bad, just as long as it appears to be better than what it replaced. I imagine if it did give people headaches that they still sat and watched...

Hazydave
Hazydave

You have already. First to analog television... the brain got used to poor color, flickering, etc. At least in most cases. TV was an overwhelming success. It changes again at the dawn of the digital age... poor quality MPEG was very hard to watch at first. But the brain adapts very quickly.. not in a handful of viewings, certainly, but over the course of regular exposure, of course it does. Its a survival mechanism... the brain works around any changes in sensory input, much as possible. Obviously, someone with a medical problem that makes long exposure difficult will not give the time to adapt, just as a person lacking depth perception won't bother. All of that is entirely different than the business issue. For Hollywood, sure, 3D is the latest way to get you into the theater. And yeah, they have abused it (not with "Toy Story"... that film wasn't shot, period, it was modeled and rendered, and the 3D version was re-rendered with the proper stereoscopic prespective). But they need something to get me into the theater. After all, while they have been shrinking screens and switching from film to 2K video projectors, I have put a 71" TV in my house, with 7.1 surround, 2K video (standard HD), much better seats, etc. And the popcorn doesn't cost $5. 00 a bucket. As for the CE industry, they're still high on the cash generated from years of the shift to HD. I have bought four HDTVs, on PS3, four HD tuners for satellite, five HD camcorders, countless bits of software, BD-R drives, etc. To get myself into HD video viewing and creation, over the last 8 or so years. Now I'm prettyy much done. And not looking to repeat this for 3D any time soon. I don't think home 3D is worth the investment yet, even as a viewer, even given that I need only upgrade my TV. Active shutter glasses are not a good answer, neirther is alternate line polarization. But its fun to watch what they come up with. This early stuff will be collecting dust soon enough, just as early HD gear is today. Besides, I'm waiting for home 4K....

brian
brian

We see in 3D every day with our own two eyes. Does that mean that everyone is sick? and twisted? Err, I mean... have headaches?

egeorge
egeorge

You know I'm really sorry some people can't watch 3d without getting a headache but I have never gotten a headache watching 3d. It must not be "functionally incompatible" with my vision or all the other legions of people who watch without a problem. Even if Roger Ebert says so! Case closed.

jwhite
jwhite

IMAX HD's (the current best IMAX standard that you'll see in most theatres that have IMAX 3D) aspect ratio is 2.20:1, which is a much closer ratio to 16:9 (widescreen) than it is to 4:3 (not widescreen). And, by the way, 4:3 is absolutely NOT more immersive than 16:9 - that's crazy. Films have been shot in widescreen for a long time because it IS more immersive. The only reason that 4:3 even still exists as a standard is because the first TVs were square. It also has nothing to do with pupil shape, widescreen is closer to "real life" (and therefore more immersive) because your eyes are lined up horizontally - you see farther left/right when looking straight forward than you do up/down. If we had one eye or our eyes were laid vertically, then yes 4:3 would be more immersive. I don't know where you watch your IMAX, but you should consider another venue if they're projecting in non-widescreen aspect ratios!

GnomeChomsky
GnomeChomsky

@dgalbreath I'm sorry but I have to call bull pucky on this claim. Are you speaking from anecdotal accounts or can you cite a source for this claim? The leap from B&W to color is not analogous to leap from 2D to 3D. Be that as it may, to claim that one merely needs to "get used to it" is factually inaccurate as well. Do a search for Roger Ebert's entry on 3D titled: "Why 3D doesn't work and never will. Case closed." 3D technology is functionally incompatible with the way we see and the way our brains process information.

gavin142
gavin142

There are many that will never be able to "adjust," as you put it, to 3d. My wife has tried several of the different techniques they're employing (including the glasses-free version), but every time it has triggered a massively debilitating Migraine, which even her strongest meds cannot touch. I will never purchase a 3d tv or go watch another 3d movie.

dgalbreath
dgalbreath

Color TV actually made older folks sick and gave some headaches until their brains adjusted to it. I think the odds are that once the brain adapts to processing the difference in the presentation that part will largely pass except for those who have nuero physical issues which might be triggered.

kevlar700
kevlar700

So it takes headaches and a drop in picture quality before a small proportion complain. I haven't had enough experience of 3D to give a definitive answer. However if you go to an imax show in 2d/3d you'll find that 4:3 (fullscreen) is actually far superior for immersing than widescreen. Our pupils are round, theories put forward by some universities about holding fingers and peripheral vision are absolute rubbish, it's physics . And as if those black lines top and bottom, can't be avoided. I have a theory that hollywood wants you to have a far better experience in the cinema to increase their revenue and so will do things to make tv and home viewing worse. This may well now include 3D.

nighthawke
nighthawke

they want to save money so they do the cheapest option available. money pits forever remain money pits

gechurch
gechurch

Hopefully your comment was tongue-in-cheek. I doubt that the entire, multi-billion dollar per year movie industry hasn't realised that they can simply apply an in-built effect of every video editing software under the sun to solve this problem.

rciafardone@gmail.com
rciafardone@gmail.com

That means that other 3D movies are gut wrenching horrible or your definition of excellent is absolutely different from mine. This is not a XOR tho... Seriously were you being sarcastic?