Enterprise Software

TechRepublic's 2010 salary survey reveals state of IT jobs in U.S.

TechRepublic and Global Knowledge have again produced one of the IT industry's most comprehensive salary surveys. Learn which IT skills are in demand.

TechRepublic and Global Knowledge have again collaborated to produce one of the IT industry's most thorough and comprehensive salary surveys. The 2010 IT Skills and Salary Report is now available as a free download (registration required).

The 12-page PDF includes data and/or graphs on the following topics:

  • Job satisfaction, and salary based on job satisfaction
  • Impact of salary and job satisfaction on job hunting
  • Salary range of respondents
  • Salaries by job role
  • Salaries by certification
  • Salaries by industry
  • Salaries by geography
  • Comparison of benefits, 2009 vs. 2010
  • Reasons behind a salary increase

This year's survey definitely reflects the current economic climate and its impact on the IT profession. This is summed up in the report's introduction:

"The global recession that began in 2008 has impacted almost everyone, either through job loss, reduction in salary and benefits, or job change. This year's salary survey, the third in partnership between Global Knowledge and TechRepublic, captures the magnitude of changes that have impacted the IT profession...

"The recession has held salaries in check for the IT profession. The average salary for respondents was $82,115, up less than one percent over what was reported in the 2009 IT Skills and Salary Report (Figure 1). This is significantly less than the 10% gain seen between 2008 and 2009; however, it is consistent with broader salary trends in the United States.1 Less than half of this year's respondents (43%) reported receiving a salary increase, down from 70% in the prior year. Two-thirds of those that reported receiving a raise indicated the primary reason was performance in their current position (65%). Over 46% indicated their salaries were capped without a raise. One in nine respondents (11%) indicated their salaries had been reduced."

We offer this report as a service to our loyal TechRepublic members and we especially thank those of you who were among the 19,500 participants of the survey itself. Please download the PDF and share your thoughts in the discussion thread below.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

131 comments
troy.kinney
troy.kinney

This is entirely inflated. There are no IT jobs paying that or hiring for those amounts in my state. I've worked in the field for 15 years.

Sensor Guy
Sensor Guy

Jason, Maybe it's the PDF software I use, but I got only 12 pages and some of the End Notes (references) were missing. As a matter of fact only the first reference was in the document and it had been cut off at mid-sentence.

netoide
netoide

How interesting! In my country a Tech makes around 8k but it can increase to up to 20k if you work for a US outsourcing call center. Still, most people there aren?t even certified and know squat. I actually left my job in a renowned US company to work for less on the field. I?m against giving cheap crappy service :P

FortBragg_Surfgoddess
FortBragg_Surfgoddess

Sh*^, this is like when I was in the Marine Corps and every year you would get this Leave and Earning Statement report that said your total compensations was XXXX. Yeah Freaking Right! Or like in the Tequila Sunrise movie when the reporter said what the value of a Drug bust was, and Mel Gibson's Character says, "Yeah in what town?" I wish it were true, but it is about 15 to 20K inflated from where I sit.

yattwood
yattwood

I am a terrible test taker; always have been. However, I know how to search the Web, use Oracle MetaLink and Microsoft TechNet; I have my own library of O'Reilly, Oracle Press, Microsoft Press and "For Dummies" (UNIX for Dummies is how I learned UNIX after having been an IBM CICS/DL1 programmer) books. I've had to do recoveries late into the night, with wailing and gnashing of management teeth....I've observed a lot of people (especially offshore) who have Oracle Certification and can barely start an Oracle database in SQL*Plus! These people can read the right books and answer the test questions, but give them an ORA-0600 in a production database, and see what happens!

srjohn57
srjohn57

For whatever your reasons, and however you compiled your data, this is irresponsible. The bottom line is that you have lost all credibility with me in this arena. There's lies, damn lies, then there's these statistics you posted.

hardymariana
hardymariana

All of us will look at it from our point of view... Mine, considerably more males responded this year vs last. Unfortunately, our career is still gender bias and men do make more money than women. Not a great study, thanks but no thanks.

ramamamidi
ramamamidi

I hoped that the raise would have been more, given the current economic growth in non US Countries. But anyway, good to see some bright numbers

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

TR needs to openly publish what companies are paying that much. Employees with clearances in the Washington DC area don't come close to those numbers.

KansasITGuy
KansasITGuy

In topeka, an hour to my west, that may be true, but in Overland Park, and even across the border in to missouri, they ARE paying those numbers. I am working for one of those companies currently, and there are several more out there available in our area.

WiseITOne
WiseITOne

Thank you for adding that last line there. One person looking out really doesn't mean much. Of course this "data" is from human respondants. Anyone can put any number for their salary. It is not scientific or verifiable, many respondants could be lying. See my other post about this being a FREE survey with human data. An example of a good survey are the ones ADP comes out with declaring the job loss numbers for the month. I make the point again, if you have a job you should just keep on walking. We still have serious economic problems and many that are unemployed - maybe you would like to switch with them - I am sure they would like the pay increase.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

Your accomplishments and abilities mean nothing to the stooges in management and HR who hold the purse strings or make the hiring decisions. They are used to looking at numbers and paper credentials. Why? Because 1) They don't understand what you do. And 2) Paper covers their butts. Certifications, like degrees, help get you the job and the money. Experience actually helps you KEEP the job. If dropping a few thousand on certs helps me land a 20-50% salary increase or get me the job, it's a good investment. However, a certification doesn't mean you know what you're doing. I deal with paper certified "Engineers" all the time. 50% of the time they have no clue what they're talking about.

WiseITOne
WiseITOne

Really, I find it funny how non-cert people slam anyone that has a cert or degree. Very defensive posture. I sense these folks feel threatened. Really, take you and another person to an interveiw, you both possess the same experience but the other person has a degree and certs...who gets the job? I think I will start calling you folks the anti-certs. Its ok, I like your mentality, it gives me the leg up.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

What are your specific complaints about this survey?

WiseITOne
WiseITOne

WHY are you all complaining? IT is a FREE survey. You aren't being FORCED to read it or to pay to see it. Of course it isn't perfect, what statitical information from human respondants is? At least it is a rough estimate and guide. Stop the MOANING please. IT seems to be full of angry disgruntled people.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

The methods of the survey are clearly spelled out in the report. This is simply a survey of TechRepublic members and other working IT professionals. In other words, we're just sharing the data that you folks have given to us.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

All of this data comes from all of you. We didn't go off somewhere else and find another group of IT pros. TechRepublic is the largest community of IT professionals on the Internet and this community provides the foundation of this report.

roxroe
roxroe

Just look at the cover. White - male - young. The fact there are older men and women in the field for a long time is just overlooked. We don't exist. I think these reports are to: 1. sell IT classes 2. Attract youth into these occupations Statistically there have been less and less women entering this fields From TR own discussion on the matter. "According to Computerworld magazine, the number of women choosing to major in computer science dropped 70 percent between 2000 and 2005"

xmlmagician
xmlmagician

A quick observation is the average age which tells me that by 40 you should be somewhere around a management position, which brings me nicely to my next point, if you are in management you have time to take surveys and let the rest do the work ;-). So the numbers might be about right. The one problem with salary surveys and averages in general it can be very misleading as if you have some one at ?150k, one at ?40k and one at ?20k then you have an average of ?70k. P.S: on a day off :-)

Sensor Guy
Sensor Guy

I complained a few days ago that the "End Notes", which would normally show the references and sources of such information, were removed from the version of the document displayed to me. The document is clearly cut off in the middle of the text of the first "End Note" or reference. No one has responded to my complaint from Tech Republic's staff.

mis
mis

Most companies request that you read and sign a confidentiality agreement when hired. This sort of information (your salary) is normally covered in that agreement - apart from that most companies frown on any employees sharing salary information unless it is done anonomously or where the information would not trickle back to others in the company (nothing makes peers more disgruntled then knowing what the other person makes that works beside them especially if they have the same job title but one has been there longer and is making less)

bjubar
bjubar

One reason these surveys are able to get valid data from respondents is because they maintain individual and company anonymity. I work in IT in Washington, and there are plenty of people -- especially on-site contractors -- who make $100k+ salaries. At least this survey makes generalizations based upon an analysis of thousands of data points. You're making blanket statements based upon a single person's limited view of the world.

T.Walpole
T.Walpole

It is clear that these statistics are averages based on many variables which makes it very difficult to make comparisons to one's exact scenario without having access to all the statistical data and doing one's own analysis. Or maybe you are underpaid?

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Obviously, your mileage will vary greatly based on industry, geography, and especially years on the job.

dan
dan

I also wonder where they pull those numbers out of ... well I got an idea but ... Isn't it nice that Global Knowlegde put those stats together for us and made sure that they have their little section about certificates in there and made absolutely sure to let us know that you make more money if you have multiple certificates. Looks to me like they're trying a little too hard to sell us one of their overpriced courses. BTW I own an IT company that provides support to small and medium size companies and I always hire based on experience over certifications.

IC-IT
IC-IT

Perhaps they answered with what they wanted to be payed. ;-) IT Technician $56K ???!!!! on average ???!!!!

onthego
onthego

The Kansas City area has better paying jobs and much higher quality jobs to boot. KC tends to be its own world in comparison to the rest of Kansas and much of Missouri. I understand what the Topeka person is saying as I once lived in Wichita and left because of rediculously low pay scale and not a lot of good jobs available. That is unless you wanted to hop on the Boeing merry-go-round. (I understand Boeing has since left town.)

Jack.B.Sprat
Jack.B.Sprat

I agree. Where I live, I would probably make half of what I do. I drive 1.25 hours one way, every day for the past fifteen years. These survey numbers are a bit low from my area. I'm 56 and have a wide background in I/T. Everything infrastructure. I'm the Answerman for our enterprise group. I am not a manager, nor play one on TV. I have a CS degree, no certs (my company doesn't believe in them)and over twenty years experience. I received half the average pay raise and twice the bonus. I have no kids running circles around me, but a number that I have trained who are very good. I'll hang around for a couple of more years. Get the education. I went back to school full time at 38 after a 14 year career in the Army. It was very hard. In my industry, a BS is just to get in the door. Quit bitching and make the extra effort.

yattwood
yattwood

Greetings, My frustration (and I probably did not communicate it well) is NOT with certifications or degrees (I have a BA and a Master's Degree, just not in IT.....) it is an _assumption_ that a certification/degree = actual working knowledge. There are Oracle Certified Professional who know the ins and outs of Oracle, who can read database dumps, know all about the x$.* tables (The Ones Oracle Support Tells You Are Not For The Mere DBA :-) ) - I say "fantastic!" But when _I_ have to tell the offshore DBA's that management contracts Because They Cost Less And Have Oracle Certifications how to run SQL*Plus scripts to do the _simplest_ things in a database, then, yes I do have a problem.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

It's complete bullshit. It's not realistic at all. It's just a bunch of numbers that don't mean anything. We aren't expecting it to be perfect, we just expect it to represent reality.

dave.g.johnson
dave.g.johnson

Given that the sample is of those who choose to respond, there's no scientific basis for accuracy. Respondent bias skews everything.

bjubar
bjubar

Any analysys is only as good as the data gathered. So the only way to have a perfect analysis is to have perfect data. And the only way to have perfect data is to have it all... salary and bonus numbers for every IT person in every company. Since that isn't likely to happen, I think this survey is solid and can provide helpful insight for plenty of people with careers in IT. Thanks.

gr2005
gr2005

I am one of those older workers in IT and I totally agree - there is a lot of gender bias and differences in pay still in this field. I can understand about the drop in computer science majors as i have often considered a career change.

phil.beach
phil.beach

I disagree with the manager comment. I played that role for a few years but I prefer to stay in the technical system engineering front. My 27+ years of system design and development over a continuing changing number of platforms, languages and tools over the years gives me insight to the technical aspects that most managers would love to have -- but don't. Don't be fooled into think a management path is the only way to good pay - it's not. The things I've seen and done over the years provides me with the insight and direction to really excel in todays environment. And yeah, I don't code in FORTRAN or PL/1, or even PSCAL anymore, but languages don't matter and neither do the tools. If anything they've made system engineering easier and faster. In most environments I've worked, especially client locations, their staff is typically single focus single skills. What I can bring to the table is the ability to pull those all together and know what can and will work. So don't sell system engineering short. If I wanted to be a kindergarden cop - I'd become a manager again. I'd much rather deal with technical issues than someones sick kid, dead car battery, or just plain unwillingness to contribute.

solrak29
solrak29

I agree, perhaps they should include a standard deviation number or break the results down by cities with significant impact on the salary average. As far as management is concerned; what about the individual who is 40 and doesn't see management position to their liking?

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

The cut-off text continues at the top of the next column. Just in case your file is corrupted, here are the complete endnotes: Endnotes 1. Even though some companies have cut the pay of workers, the average hourly wage has still risen 1.5–2.5 percent over the last year, depending on which government survey is examined. Average weekly pay has risen less (zero-to-one percent) because hours have been cut. But average prices have fallen. Altogether, the typical worker has received a one-to-two percent infation-adjusted raise over the last year. "Jobless Rate Hits 10.2%, With More Under-employed," The New York Times, November 7, 2009, Section A, Business and Financial Desk, page 1. 2. There are six times as many Americans seeking work as there are job openings, and the average duration of unemployment–time the average job-seeker has spent looking for work–is more than six months, the highest level since the 1930s. "The Jobs Imperative," The New York Times, November 30, 2009, Section A, Op-Ed, page 31. 3. There are a host of IT jobs that will stay stateside. "Positions that focus on strategy, architecture, project management and relationship management are safer because you want someone doing that work who is plugged into the company and can act as the representative to the CIO." "Long-Term Effects of Recession Expected to Hurt U.S IT Jobs," eWeek.com, November 30, 2009, http://www.eweek.com/c/a/IT-Management/LongTerm-Effects-of-Recession-Expected-to-Hurt-US-IT-Jobs-389562/. 4. IT Spending Forecast, 4Q09 Update: IT Spending in 2010 and Beyond, January 2010, Gartner, Inc. edit: clean up "non-standard" characters, fix link

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

Notice that you're the only one claiming that?

WiseITOne
WiseITOne

Math must not be the strong suit for some of you. This is an average of 19,000 people. Mediam is $80k. That means that their could be 1/4 of the responants making $150k + 1/4 making above $90k, 1/4 making just below $80k and another 1/4 making far below $80k. Those of you slamming the survey must not know what happens when you add a bunch of numbrs together and divide... or am I missing something? I think this is very good. Also, you must see that 67% of the respondants had degrees! That typically means a higher salary. This translates to higher average salary since more respondants who took the survey had salaries above $80k - skews higher. Everyone that complained seems that they are unwilling to change circumstanes to make more money - move, change jobs, get a degree/certs. Finally, I would say that those who make close to or more thn $80k aren't going to come on here to complain...hence those complaining are the digruntled IT employees who "don't make enough". Hey, if you make above $30k, still have a job, and don't live in poverty you should be happy.

Jeff Dickey
Jeff Dickey

... for those of us who aren't sons-in-law of the CFO, who never saw income recover from dot-bomb and mass importation of cheap labor before our latest gift/sucker-punch from Wall Street: The survey is a sick joke, which will no doubt be used to further degrade our pay and working conditions. "If you were any good, see how much you'd be worth!!" I believe the word we've been looking for is "propaganda."

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

Show me a quality company paying those salaries.

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

Has anyone ever met an IT guy that didn't tell you he/she was making more money that they were actually making? I wonder how many IT pros surveyed were honest.

bill
bill

"BTW I own an IT company that provides support to small and medium size companies and I always hire based on experience over certifications." Dan, you are SOOOOO gonna be getting emailed applications! lol!

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Here's what I posted below: "All of this data comes from all of you. We didn't go off somewhere else and find another group of IT pros. TechRepublic is the largest community of IT professionals on the Internet and this community provides the foundation of this report." It is simply a survey of the TechRepublic community and other IT pros who choose to respond.

edh1215
edh1215

It is good to here from an IT business owner that you reward experience over a cert. I've been doing IT for 15 years and I have no certs. I have no time to play around with studying and no money to throw down to pay for the tests and stuff. Oh, btw, I have no money because the numbers in the report are way inflated. IT pays for crap.

xmlmagician
xmlmagician

I agree with the second part of your reply, experience over certifications any time of the day and this comes from a guy with a million and one certificates :-).

solrak29
solrak29

I see alot of respondents; mostly IT tech having a lot of complaints about the average pay noted in the survey. The next thing I look is is your location in US. You have to remember that this survey is taken by people all around, not just in your part of the country. I would expect, from my perspective places like Tennesee, Arizona, South Carolina that salaries are significant lower than that of say New York City and the survey shows that. Also if you are looking at the "average" salary across the nation, you have to also look at the number of respondants. You also have to take into the factor of those not really posting acurate numbers. To me the survey gives you a general feel what people are getting paid all over the nation and automatically I would expect the high end and/or average to be in the locations that generally have the higher pay scale. In the end you can look at your salary and look at your local market and adjust yourself accordingly. Your just proving how competitive the market (especially IT Tech) is and you need everything in your arsenal to maintain your position or gain the next one. For example: A college degree. Just some more thoughts to help you guys rationalize where your at.

zredhot
zredhot

I work in IT and I've been with the company two years. I'm still waiting on my first raise. Bonus? No. And I don't have a degree. I'm 10 classes shy of my Bachelors but I can't afford to finish. I'm in the position of not making enough money, yet almost have my degree but can't afford to finish to get it. It's a viscious cycle. I own a home and it is sucking everything out of us. I have been driving the same car for 11+ years and severely need a new one but can't afford to buy one. So I would really love to know specifically which companies, they gathered their information from because I would like to apply to them! And I agree, without a degree, the pay is lower. And there are people who hold degrees who don't know half of what I know yet they are paid a higher salary for simply having that piece of paper. That was something my older brother told me when I was younger. And some day I too will have that piece of paper. Even if it takes me another 10 years. I will get my Bachelors degree. So right now I struggle. Thank you for letting me offer my thoughts.

tweakerxp
tweakerxp

I wish we could get 56K!! It's actually more around 35K to 40K on a good day. Entry & level 1 tech jobs are few around here. Lots of senior managment stuff but not a lot of enrty level or first level jobs at all.

solrak29
solrak29

I think it is relative to your location and industry that you are actually working in. If you look at the report you can see the different pay levels by state alone and it's fairly correct from my point of view.

developer_ja
developer_ja

Like how much for IT Software Developer in your area?

t_noahr
t_noahr

Good point. Perhaps the salary isn't really base salary but instead includes benefits...but this doesn't explain the bonus amounts.

trent_bergen
trent_bergen

I've been working for about 2 years. I have 2 associate degrees still not finished and 5 certifications. But as you well know there is a major difference between reading about something and doing something. There is no substitute for real world knowledge. And there's alot of things I should probably know but don't know. And there's alot of things that I know that you wouldn't know unless you have indepthly read every text book and manual. There are things that I've picked up from reading that people who have been in the business for 30 years don't know because I'm not as intuitive because I have not been doing this forever, so if I don't go that extra mile I'm screwed. The fact is most of you can probably do these things in your sleep because you've done them so many times. Me it takes me alittle bit longer, and I have to look up alot of details. But I figure that's probably how most of you got where you are. so here's hoping

jck
jck

The biggest problem is the great number of respondents to the survey being management level. Hence why the overall average would be so high. Then, I think it's quite possible the majority of respondents are in large metros. Hence why a Senior Developer in a big city can make twice what I do. I do know one thing: I am looking at other states to see if I can find something better paying, with better benefits (bonus? I have never had one...and not for lack of effort), and better work environment. Evidently unless you live in Miami, you don't make nearly what the market average is in Florida.

zornwil
zornwil

Doesn't anyone remember the famous story of the FDR-Landon race in 1936 where the Literary Digest - which had correctly picked the presidential winners prior - predicted a big loss for FDR based on a survey of THEIR audience? What data suggests Tech Republic's readers who choose to participate in this survey well enough represent the industry? What independent data suggests that in 3 years the IT industry has shifted from 3:1 male:female to 3.9:1 male:female - quite a significant shift. As to people saying "what could be done better," what about an old-fashioned carefully done random sampling? The government surveys of IT salaries may skew a bit too low but I will take that any day over these sorts. Similarly, even many of the contracting/placement agencies have somewhat better data.

tweakerxp
tweakerxp

What have most of the respondents been smoking? :)

bjubar
bjubar

I said "perfect". In statistics, you always have a margin of error because you're extrapolating from a subset of data. Unless you're claiming that a random sampling like this survey will provide a subset of data that is an exact representation of the entire data set...?

WiseITOne
WiseITOne

Statistically - you only need 1,000 people to have a good average. More people or more data doesn't help or aid the final resuls any. Having everyones salary will not change the numbers. Really, they could have stopped at 1,000 - 3,000 respondants and called it a day.

xmlmagician
xmlmagician

Sir if you read what i just posted before i read your comment it is exactly what i said about the breadth of experience you need in IT in order to manage to have the span of career you had. Now to the wrong part, with all due respect to the managers you had before if they acted like and i quote "kindergarten cop" they were in the wrong profession. You will be surprised how well people respond to direction, trust and freedom, any of the 200+ people i manage they can walk in to my office anytime the want no matter the pay grade faction (IT) and they do. 80% of the time have ideas things that are crap but i live for that 20% who are going to walk in and make my day with a great idea. Sorry but i get excited about IT and people management (sad i know) Anyway....I would love to have a person like you in my department. Consider your self an asset to who ever you work for....NOW...back to work and stop slacking :-)

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

He calls it "research skills", and combines it with a broad spectrum of basic knowledge of all things IT and years of experience to provide a quality of service the young hotshots can only dream about.

highlander718
highlander718

good one. do you put "Google skills" in your resume :-) ?

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I'm 55 and still doing hands on. Am I making $80k a year? No. Am I going to get laid off soon? Only if I feck up or people stop buying groceries.

xmlmagician
xmlmagician

@Arsynic With all due respect "Management is the only place for "old people" in IT. " it is a very unfortunate generalisation. One of my best IT guys is 50 odd .He is a star and he did not fancy management as he recognised that he does not have the people skills.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

...but soon that won't mean a damn thing when the kids are the ones hiring.

xmlmagician
xmlmagician

There is only so far you can specialise your self on a certain IT discipline which will only get you so far pay wise and on top of that you will lose your versatility which is the strongest suit of anyone who wants to be successful in the IT industry There are far more qualified people than me but may i suggest teaching if you see that your salary does not grow.

paul.willy
paul.willy

OK I'm 57, tried management and didn't like it. I do education and consulting, and have no worries about my ability to compete with the kids. 32 years of service management and troubleshooting, and great google skills to make up for an old brain.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

Management is the only place for "old people" in IT.

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

Citing RHT is like calling a ouiji board definitive proof.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

There is another survey out from Robert Half with regards to IT salaries, and the results weren't drastically different from this one. Further, feel welcome to take a look at job boards. The salaries that are shown are very much in line with these surveys. So, you can discount both surveys, salaries listed on job boards, as well as others who have said that these salary ranges aren't total b.s., or you can continue to believe that there is a grand conspiracy to mislead the IT masses. While I do find some faults with the survey (linking salaries to certs seems to benefit GK in a way that is uncomfortable), I am confident that TR is presenting the information they were given by the TR members. So, are you saying that your TR peers submitted bogus information, and are in effect, liars, and/or that TR is part of some deception, or are you just b_tching & moaning for the sake of doing so?

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

Get your story straight, then come back.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

Have you thought of trash collection? Perhaps the pay and benefits would be more to your liking?

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

So which is it? $40K or $100K for the best and the brightest? Have you thought of politics or perhaps something on wall street?

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

As I mentioned in a different post, we've actually been expanding. The development side has doubled in the last 6 months, and our infrastructure team has grown by 25%. For every position we post, we've been getting at least 100 resumes. For a Tier 1 position (pay range $45--$60K), I received over 300 resumes.

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

If there was a company that was actually paying those salaries there wouldn't be any job openings AND they'd have a line at the front door of people waiting to get in, every single day.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

I have to agree with kjubar (with regards to the averages). The salaries listed in the survey are pretty close to what we pay at my organization; as well as close to what I've seen for jobs posted online in the area. Not saying that means the survey is infallible; but that it isn't so far out of whack for what I've seen in this area.

santeewelding
santeewelding

That you, yourself, are degreed, higher, and better -- as opposed to cheap and easy. Shows.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

As a technician, I often encounter both equipment and infrastructure designed with no consideration for maintenance or repair, making my job that much more difficult. Consider submitting your engineers' designs or prototypes to a highly experienced technician and asking him for his opinion on ease of maintenance. You might be surprised at the improvements he suggests, and, if he's really good, how simple they are to implement. I've been doing this long enough to understand there have to be compromises in design and construction, but there is no excuse for putting console ports for rack-mounted equipment on the rear panel. And that's the [u]least[/u] of some of the things I've seen.

pfarrjam
pfarrjam

I am very much in agreement as well. Those with degrees earn more because they've received the higher level training to create better solutions. As an IT manager I need those who administer and maintain - it's an important role, but quite truthfully the skill set is a cheap and easy commodity to get. When I need designs, new capabilities, and critical thinking I look to my educated and certified engineers to deliver solutions. This kind of capability comes with education, experience, and a passion for improvement. If you are going to sit there and complain about the facts then you're declaring yourself to be obsolete. If you choose to take this as useful data and look to improve to get to the higher salary then I may want to talk to you about a job in the future.

dennis
dennis

Reading down through these comments, it seems the people without degree and/or certs are saying they do not make anywhere near those kind of numbers. But most of the survey respondents did have a degree and/or certs. Folks, this seems like a no brainer - get a degree and some certifications. I'm a hiring manager, make above the average, my people are not far off the TR numbers, some have degrees and others do not. You know what, the degree people get paid more. You know why, when I need something off the wall, they are the people who can deliver. NOW I KNOW that is a gross generalization, but in my corner of the world, the degreed deliver out of the box solutions, the non degreed are maintaining. If most of you are 40 something or older, then you know the Shell Answer Man. Who is the person that EVERYONE goes to for solutions? Here they DO HAVE a degree. I also have military equivalence experience, used it to feed myself while I spent the GI bill on college, and recently got an MBA. As for experience, I am trying to drill it into my son's head that just his schooling is not going to get employers excited. Not only does he need to do good in school, but he also needs to have some experience to get an employer interested. My office is hot from all the steam while I was venting!

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

And I know that averages are supposed to represent reality (or close to it). However, these figures seem like outliers. There are differences in salary based on the area, but I don't know any A+ Technicians making $70k anywhere. A PC Technician is now a minimum wage job. Some of these statistics are disingenuous. I have an A+ Certification and make ~$65k a year, but then again, I'm not a PC Technician, I have a CS degree and other certifications. But to interpret that as an A+ Certified person making $65k is ridiculous.

Ian Frazer
Ian Frazer

The survey is cool - don't get me wrong. BUT ... it would be nice to have the data behind the tables. Example: "Salaries by Popular Certification" table. - What was the Least / Most salary? - what are the Job Titles/Positions for each Certification listed? - Break each Certification by Region (N, E, W, S), US Vs Canada, etc. This would allow we the readers, the ability to put context around some of the results. AND to be able to talk to management in a more informed manner.

WiseITOne
WiseITOne

A Senio Engineer will make more money than a low level mid level manager. A UNIX programer or server admin will make more than a mid level manager. They are all hands on but have knowledge that is in high demand and valuable. I agree a PC tech or HD staff will make far less than management but those highly skilled workers will till make more than a mid level manager. So your theory is somewhat flawed.

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

"In my experience, most people that have certs don't just have one. So a person that has an A+ also tends to have an MCSE or a CISSP or something else." So if a project manager making $100K, was also A+ a decade ago, then it got counted twice?

xmlmagician
xmlmagician

Gents, realistically the way to achieve these figures is to have some experience seniority which means that long gone the days that you had to do any PC technician etc level work, walking by dead pcs/servers is the closest you ever have to be in order to achieve these figures. See it this way: The closest you are working with a PC (physically)the further away you are from those figures and vice versa

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

You're exactly right that an A+ tech that makes 70K probably has a lot of years in the field and isn't working as a PC tech. In my experience, most people that have certs don't just have one. So a person that has an A+ also tends to have an MCSE or a CISSP or something else. Therefore, 70K is definitely NOT the value of an A+ cert itself. I think we can agree on that.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

There's no way an A+ earns you close to $70k. Now it's true that maybe someone who has an A+ makes $70k, but they've probably been in IT for 15+ years and isn't a PC Tech. This is just disingenuous and an attempt to sell overpriced certification exams.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

That's 30 credits–an entire year. Figure $8-10k, plus whatever fees are involved.

WiseITOne
WiseITOne

You can't afford to NOT get the degree now. 10 CREDITS? That is 2-3 classes and about $1-3k. You really can't get a personal loan, stafford loan, or some line of credit. Get a CC and get your degree done. In 10 years if you add your lost wages from not earning your degree I think you will kick yourself for waiting. Go out and get it done. Do anything (legally) you need to so you can finish. Again, a degree isn't really the knowledge, it is the persistance and ability to finish something in your life. Most grads will say they forget 90% of the information if they aren't applying it on the job. Degrees are in almost all instances gateways to higher pay and higher ladders with bigger windows and doors.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I want to know what company is paying support techs $68k. Here in the SC midlands, jobs for experienced techs with A+ are being advertised at about $30-$35k. If you're lucky, an entry-level job starts at $25k.

johnsteel
johnsteel

I would like to know where the starting salary is $68K for an entry level Computer Technician. I would like to submit a resume. I work in a small town in the South East. I make $45K with benifits. I am 43 and I have been in IT for 20 years. I work at a VAR that at the moment only has 3 employees. I have compared salaries with others and know this is what is paid around this area. I worked as a Systems Admin 10 years ago and my salary was about $10K + higher than a Computer Tech.