CXO

TechRepublic's CIO Jury: We're looking for a few good IT leaders

Inspired by our colleagues at Silicon.com, TechRepublic is launching a new CIO Jury and we're looking for experienced IT leaders to respond to a simple straw poll twice a month when the subject is in your area of expertise. See if you meet the criteria.

Inspired by our colleagues at Silicon.com, TechRepublic is launching a new CIO Jury and we're looking for experienced IT leaders to respond to a simple straw poll twice a month when the subject is in your area of expertise. See if you meet the criteria.

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CIOs control hundreds of millions of dollars of IT budgets, decide how to best utilize IT workers, and make critical decisions about which new projects and technologies to deploy. As a result, TechRepublic and the millions of IT professional who come here every month to find the latest trends and best practices in IT are keenly interested in what's going on between the ears of these IT leaders.

Of course, because CIOs have so much responsibility they are also difficult to pin down and they have precious little time to participate in activities beyond the day job. So TechRepublic is going to be launching a new program that engages them every two weeks - with minimal effort on their part - in an informal straw poll on some of the most important and timely issues facing the IT world.

This will be called TechRepublic's CIO Jury, and the concept is based on the original CIO Jury from our U.K. sister site Silicon.com, where you can find lots of lively opinions from leading U.K. tech chiefs. While Silicon limits its pool of IT leaders to the U.K., TechRepublic will limit its group to U.S. IT heads. However, they will be times when we will collaborate and ask the same question to both groups and then compare and contrast the results.

How the CIO Jury will work

The TechRepublic editorial staff will develop the bi-weekly questions to send to the CIOs. We will also take suggestions from the TechRepublic community. To submit a potential CIO Jury question, you can simply click the Contact link at the top of this page.

The featured question will be e-mailed to the group of participating IT leaders along with a link to a related story that sheds light on the topic. The CIOs will then simply respond to the e-mail with a "Yes" or a "No" vote (or even a "Y" or "N" from a smartphone). For those inclined to do so, CIOs can also include a one or two sentence comment along with the vote.

The first 12 IT leaders who submit their votes will then make up that week's CIO Jury. Their names will be listed at the bottom of the story announcing the results. However, while the overall vote and the names of the jury will be revealed, the specific votes of the individual jury members will not be disclosed. Almost all comments will also be included in the report, including any comments from other CIOs who weren't among the first 12 respondents but still took the time to reply and include their thoughts.

To get a look at how this works, here are three examples of CIO Jury reports from Silicon.com:

Criteria for joining the CIO Jury

TechRepublic has a core group of IT leaders that will serve as a foundation for the CIO Jury, but we're also looking to expand that circle as we launch this program. Here are the basic qualifications that we're looking for:

  • Must be the head of an IT department and control an IT budget
  • Title does not have to be CIO; it can be CTO, IT director, vice president of IT, etc.
  • Must be based in the United States
  • Can work in the public or private sector

Here are the factors that disqualify IT leaders from participating:

  • Can't work for an IT vendor (IBM, Microsoft, Cisco, Symantec, etc.)
  • Can't be a one-person IT department
  • Can't be located outside the U.S.

In traditional TechRepublic style, we are appealing to the community and allowing our members to self-nominate if they meet the criteria and are interested in participating. If you'd like to join TechRepublic's CIO Jury, click the Contact link at the top of this page and send your name, title, company, location, and e-mail address. Alternatively, you can e-mail this information to sanity at techrepublic.com.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the book, Follow the Geeks.

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