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The five most overhyped tech products of 2010

The pace of technology innovation quickened in 2010 but there were still plenty of overhyped products floating around. Here are the top five.

The pace of innovation in the technology industry quickened again in 2010, after stumbling momentarily in 2009 because of the global recession. The most potent sign of the rebound was the steady stream of new products, new technologies, and new ideas that pushed the previous boundaries and rethought the status quo.

Of course, innovation means taking risks and some of them -- including some the most widely publicized -- turn out to duds. And, even some of the most successful new products get overhyped and oversold.

That's the subject of this week's Monday morning editorial: the most overhyped products of 2010. Here's my list.

5. Apple iPad

This is the pick that I'm going to take the most flak over, but it deserves to be on the list and I'll explain why. There's no denying that the iPad has been a mega-hit. Over 7 million of them were sold in its first six months on the market and it is changing the computing industry more than any single product has in the past decade. As I said in my article The truth about iPad: It's only good for two things, it is a very good effort for a 1.0 product.

But, the iPad has been hyped into the stratosphere to the point that too many people are thinking of it as full laptop replacement. It is not. It is a PC companion. While the iPad has cannibalized the low-end of the laptop market, especially netbooks, you have to keep in mind that most of those buyers are looking for a second, more portable machine. In business, the iPad is a great fit for executives who spend all day in meetings and for consultants and field workers who aren't at a desk but are out interacting with customers. However, it's still not a great fit for people who need to sit down and efficiently plow through a lot of work. That's a lot of people.

4. Microsoft Kinect

Bill Gates has been talking about this product for years, long before it ever had a product name. I remember when the Nintendo Wii came out, Gates said the real innovation would be when you could play a tennis video game with your own racket in your hand instead of a game controller. To Microsoft's credit, the company has almost entirely brought that vision to life with the Microsoft Kinect, a new add-on for Xbox 360 that is flying off the shelves this holiday season.

When it works, the Kinect is a pretty cool experience that allows you to jump into a video game to run obstacle courses and kick soccer balls right in the middle of your own living room, without breaking anything. It's great exercise and it's amazingly accurate at times. However, it doesn't work very well in rooms with direct sunlight (is it only meant for basements and mancaves?), the facial recognition feature is laughably awful, and navigating menus with the gesture interface is frustratingly slow.

The Kinect is a very creative innovation, but it's also gimmicky and raw, and it doesn't work nearly as well as the commercials make it appear.

3. Samsung Galaxy Tab

The most innovative thing about the Galaxy Tab is that Samsung was the first vendor to finally bring an Android tablet to the mass market. We've been hearing all year that an army of Android tablets would be invading in waves. It never happened, mainly because Google never released a tablet version of Android and threw cold water on the early vendors that attempted to do their own Android tablet adaptations.

Samsung took its successful Galaxy S line of Android smartphones and kicked it up a notch into a 7-inch Android tablet, and voilà, out popped the Galaxy Tab. While Samsung did an excellent job with the hardware (as I noted in my Galaxy Tab review), the software leaves a lot to be desired and the product is badly overpriced. The Galaxy Tab has been portrayed as the iPad's first real competitor, but I'd recommend waiting until the price drops, Google releases the official tablet version of Android, and the other big vendors release their Android tablets in the first half of 2011.

2. Google TV

The most disappointing technology of 2010 of Google TV. If Google would have focused on bringing Android apps to the flatscreen instead of trying to webify the television experience, this product could have been a huge success. Back in the spring I wrote that apps in Google TV could transform entertainment by essentially lowering the bar on creating a TV "channel," and not just an old school cable channel but a fully multimedia-enabled interactive channel.

That's still possible, but it would require a strategy change from Google. What the company has attempted to do with Google TV is marry Web video with traditional cable/satellite all controlled by one box that you can use to search for the content you want. Unfortunately, the user experience is confusing and cumbersome. If you really want Web pages and Web video clips on your TV, just hook up a PC or a Mac. If you want on-demand content from the Internet (podcasts, Netflix streaming, Hulu Plus, etc.) delivered in a TV-like experience then get a Roku box for a third of the price of Google TV.

1. 3DTV

It started at CES 2010 in January and carried all the way through to this holiday season. The TV vendors have bombarded the world with the message that the next big step in television is 3DTV and that you can have it today by buying their new premium TVs and polarized glasses. The problem is that neither the tech press nor the public is buying it.

In January, it was obvious that TV vendors saw 3DTV as "the next big thing" to keep people buying new TVs and to get early adopters to replace their newly-purchased flat panels with 3D models. The tech press sniffed this out right away at CES 2010 and panned the idea, knowing that buyers don't want to replace the new TVs they've just purchased in recent years and even fewer will want to wear 3D glasses in their own living rooms. But, vendors are still trying to ram 3DTVs down consumers' throats with big displays at Best Buy, Costco, and other retailers this holiday season. This is an even bigger gimmick than Microsoft Kinect and I don't see many technology buyers falling for it.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

262 comments
MikJr
MikJr

I have 2 of the 5 and am pleasantly surprised about how much fun the Kinnect and Google TV are. Try it you might like it.

jfreedle2
jfreedle2

I completely agree with the over hype of the iPad. Plain and simple, you are correct about it being a companion to a real computer. However, the price of the device should be no higher than $500 US at the highest configuration level. Any higher and you would always be better off getting a real computer.

Sam_Might_Say
Sam_Might_Say

This column reads more like a rant on technologies that aren't how Jason would like them to be. Pretty poor article really

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

sure it was actually released in 2009 but all the hype has really been poured on this year I'm just a tad tired of all the "Win 7 will solve all my problems" TV ads and the funny thing is that everything I do with my XP they don't advertise for there probably won't be a TV ad for the following scenario ... "I was having trouble setting up my home recording studio ... - - - ... then winders 7 came along" not gonna happen!

Rob C
Rob C

Very 'one eyed' about 3D TV (But you are right) In Australia there is a large electronics chain. The owner was on one of our current affairs programs, raving about how great they are. The reporter, then prepared him for the next question, by saying that the owner, could tell him (the reporter) to bug..r off, if he chose. He then asked the owner if he had a 3D TV at home. There was a very long pause, then he replied 'bug,,r off'

Sepius
Sepius

Over hyped .... was I the only one to buy "Eyetoy" for the Play station 2! .... To me the Kinect is MS version of the Eyetoy, and the more advanced games seem to be the poorer performing. This is after watching a review on Kinect games on "Good Game", our Australian game review program. The way I saw it, it seems everyone has forgotten the Eyetoy, and my PS2 Eyetoy works very well on my PS3 with Sing star. Yep Kinect was stratophericaly overhyped.

bobo300
bobo300

The iPad has been overhyped. At the same time, it has taken enough market share to be worth whatever the hype. The Samsung Tab would have been a total failure without the iPad waking up the market first, and this was made possible by everyone's most disliked Apple crowd...but credit is due where it is due. Laptop replacement as an argument is irrelevant. The thing cannot be setup without a PC/mac, and its usage is quite limited without proper synching. The other products on the list did not take enough market share to be relevant, really. However, I totally agree when it comes to Avatar. My vote to overhyped.

fbibusiness
fbibusiness

I like the new Xbox kinect. I have never bothered with tv games or most others but it works pretty good for us. I agree that some improvement in the gesture recognition on the menus is required and direct sun does affect it but overall, it is great fun and a good workout. It seems to me that it may have been over hyped but it is one of the few products that at least comes close to the hype.

coolmark82
coolmark82

I have used the 3D TV before, and actually it is great. I don't think it's really 3D, but more of a baby step towards holographic technology, because it manipulates the perception of objects and their distance from the human eye. One step we took towards holographic technology earlier was by displaying a 3D image while mist was falling. Now all we have to do is find out how to take this "3D" effect and put it into real life. Technology is progressing as I expected it to be, and before you know it we'll have things like the emergency medical hologram like the one from Star Trek Voyager.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

1.) Direct Sunlight: Actually, Kinect works BETTER in very well-lit rooms and not so good in dark rooms. 2.) Facial recognition: Kinect doesn't use facial recognition, it uses full body recognition. It works well when the system is properly calibrated with your body profile. Facial recognition was NEVER an advertised feature of Kinect.

pasj69
pasj69

Why dont you come out with these informative little tidbits before people go out and buy this junk?

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

iPad is definitely overhyped - more than anything else out there. If it wasn't for Apple's name, would it even show up in the top 25? Nope.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Flack may be an understatement, but... [b]5: The iPad -[/b] There's a difference between hype and functionality. Honestly, the hype for the iPad was running rampant long before the iPad itself was announced. Since its release, people have been constantly finding new and more productive uses for it far beyond even the first proponents' imaginings. You say " ... too many people are thinking of it as full laptop replacement..." when the reality is that too many laptop users were underutilizing the equipment they had--obviously they didn't have an absolute need for everything the laptop offered. I'm not disagreeing that the iPad is intended to be a companion device, but rather that it's intended to be supplemental to the desktop. What you may not be fully cognizant of is the fact that many of those laptops became "desktop replacements." It really depends on the kind of work involved as to whether the iPad (or a tablet in general) can really be productive. The iPad itself already does far, far more than any naysayer ever wanted to believe. [b]4. Microsoft Kinect -[/b] Up to a point, I will agree with you here. On the other hand, it has incredible potential especially as a virtual 'touch' interface with a laser/holographic display in 3D. With the right software, certain 'fantasy' interfaces we've seen in science fiction movies could become reality. But for now, yes, it's clunky and rough. Maybe if the cameras could 'see' the display so it could better reference the movements on-screen and off-, it wouldn't be so rough. [b]3. Samsung Galaxy Tab -[/b] Agreed across the board. In effect, it's too little, too late. The Tab would have been helped a lot by at least offering a semi-polished package instead of looking like a 'cheap knock-off.' I don't fault that it's a start in the right direction, but if the iPad was a 1.0, then the Galaxy Tab is a 0.5. (Of course, guess who's going to get the flack for [i]that[/i] statement!) [b]2. Google TV -[/b] To shorten your own statement here, all Google has done is add Android Media to WebTV. I've looked at it and really can't begin to find a reason to consider buying one. This looks like beta-ware from the beginning. I can think of a much better way to make this work, but honestly until all content is web-accessible, something like this simply won't work. [b]1. 3D TV -[/b] This is almost pure hype by the manufacturers. 3D at the theaters requires the use of either polarized glasses or sequential-blackout glasses, probably at a much higher frame rate than movies and video are currently viewed. I don't know of very many people who don't wear glasses on a daily basis wanting to wear them just to watch TV, nor can I imagine many glasses-wearing people wanting to wear some sort of over-goggles. Almost no other 3D technology currently available has the clarity or reliability to offer anything looking like true 3D. Personally, a laser/holographic display able to create moving opaque images that you can move around and see from all angle will be a true 3D--until then it's nothing but a simulation.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Or even 20 if you looked hard enough. Maybe this article should have 5 more added to it.

bfriesen
bfriesen

Most over hyped products of 2010 are Facebook and Twitter.

JonathanPDX
JonathanPDX

They're ALL over-hyped. The "can't live without this product" mentality prevails. And as soon as you buy one, they roll out another "New and Improved" model. What's really going to be fun is when this "cloud" that everyone touts comes back and bites all of its users in the back end. Just sayin'... ;-)

lcoleman
lcoleman

Well, it's just not possible to overhype the iPad. Just look at the sales figures. So at what sales point WOULD you no longer say it was overhyped, Jason?

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

"... always be better off getting a real computer." This is where I would disagree with you, but I will note that it's more a matter of perception and value to the user. If, as many naysayers insist, the iPad and other tablets are strictly media consumption devices, then yes, I'd be unlikely to pay more as well, in fact, I find it really difficult to believe people were willing to pay nearly $500 for the Kindle XL considering its single purpose for a screen about the same size as the iPad's. On the other hand, when a tablet is used as a companion to a desktop/laptop, offering the ability to create, store, edit display and even (with the aid of a dongle) project data, photographs, video, etc... the tablet becomes far more functional than mere media consumption. Yes, I'll admit that I use mine for consumption, I like taking favorite videos, books and music with me when I visit the in-laws or go traveling. But I'm also a photographer and a writer, and I've found it incredibly easy to download my shoots and preview them on site while my subjects watch, then perform minor editing before emailing a proof to their home computer. Yes, a laptop can do it, but the iPad makes that presentation more personal as they can hold it and study the image close up without having to bend down over a table to try to see it. Again, the value is a matter of perception to the user. For me, it's well worth what I paid for it.

jdr_03
jdr_03

Don't they have a commercial with Dr. Dre or someone? It might actually be a PC supplier's commercial, but I know Win7 was mentioned! (I also happen to like Win7, sure wouldn't upgrade to it, as I am to cheap, but I am glad I got it with the new PC)

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

..."stereoscopic" rather than "3D". But, "3D" is a lot easier to say.

spearson@8herons.com
spearson@8herons.com

You are talking about good illumination. Direct sunlight in a room is not considered good illumination. If it were, artist studios would have it, instead of preferring a northern exposure for indirect sunlight. Approximately 3/4 of apartment dwellers do not have the luxury of choosing a northern exposure for their living quarters. Similar conditions apply for house owners. The problem with direct sunlight is that it only comes from one direction and it casts dark shadows. Direct sunlight will wash out the images on sensors. Nor can cheap image sensors handle the extreme contrast range that direct sunlight creates. The infrared component of direct sunlight is intense enough to wash out infrared sensors unless you are using high-grade infrared imaging sensors, which are expensive. Those aren't high-grade infrared imaging sensors in the Kinect.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Your blastoff countdown is gonna turn heads :)

Hazydave
Hazydave

Services, not products. Next list :-)

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Look at Pet Rocks. Hell, there were people who planned their retirement around Beanie Babies. Look at Obama :D

Stalemate
Stalemate

Considering what it offers from a hardware standpoint, versus the price - it's overhyped in my book. Considering it's from Apple - the only thing magical here is the marketing overhype and how many users thought / think they needed this device. And I fully agree that this is a consumption device, not a production device. It's even debatable whether or not categorizing it in the netbook camp is fitting, since most other netbooks already offer multitasking and USB ports.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Hype... Nearly every video game for example. Even Apple said that sales were a disappointment for the ipad. Unlike the iphone where they got a long initial lead and made some money, the iPad had competitors on day 1, and less than a year afterwords, has direct competitors. Call Of Duty out sold the iPad in less than a month.

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

Seems to me that the value of a device is set by many factors, not the least of which is it's value to the people who actually find a use for an item, not by those who fail to see the potential of the device, or simply do not have a need for it. There are many examples of this in every aspect of the market place. There are tools and equipment in the medical field that are very expensive, and for the most of us we can't understand how the suppliers get away with charging what they do. But the folks in the medical field pay the price because they need the equipment. The same is true at just about any office across the country when it comes to a professional grade copy machine. Those things cost a lot more than people think they do (they usually start at $5k and go up quickly from there). To many of us, the thought of spending sometimes tens of thousands of dollars for a copy machine is nuts, but in business it makes since because there is a huge need, and it has become cost effective to the point that we really don't think about the alternatives any more (remember carbon paper?). The iPad is really no different in my opinion. There are folks who "don't get it" and think the price is too high. Then there are also folks who have spent the money and are completely happy with their purchase. My bet is that MOST folks who have actually bought iPads are very happy with their purchase and many can't imagine going back to not having one. I struggled with spending that kind of money on the iPad but I find it so useful that now I would have no problem spending the money to replace it if it were damaged or stolen. I too am a (part time) photographer and use my iPad for the same uses you mentioned. Also, in my day-job (in the real world) I use my iPad for many things. Obviously there's email and the web, but I also find that I keep a lot of documents on it (in PDF via GoodReader) and I also use it for training a lot. I even use it for presentations on a projector quite often (and I never thought I'd do that). I shoot out an email once a week to share the highlights of my weekly activities to others in my department, and that is made much easier by keeping a journal on my iPad (which is always with me). I also keep a to do list going on a 2Do app. Oh yeah, I also watch movies via NetFlix when I travel, which is a whole lot more comfortable than using my laptop. Bottom line? To those that think it's over-priced, just because it may not be worth the price to you, doesn't mean it's not worth the price to others (a whole lot of others I might add).

Who Am I Really
Who Am I Really

have no-names in them and none of them apply to how I use my systems ie. - record 24-bit Audio through a hardware accelerated multi-channel E-MU Pro PCI Sound Card - create Duplication Quality Master CDDA burned @ 4x with Nero 6.x etc.

chrisbedford
chrisbedford

You give credence to mainstream news services at your own peril, double or trebly so on technology (or probably just about any specialised) topic. They are fine for superficial looks at what's going on (yes, there really are floods in Southern California) but don't take at face value any "in depth" or "analysis" you get from the Ted Turners of this world!

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

There's a big difference between hobbyists and hackers tweaking Kinect and Microsoft touting it as a feature. Microsoft never advertised or demonstrated facial recognition as a Kinect feature.

jmarkovic32
jmarkovic32

Problem solved. Fact is that Jason's points on Kinect were weak. And this is coming from someone who doesn't care about it either way. I don't own one and don't plan to.

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

"Progress is our most important product". Don't question The Ron.

verd
verd

Products or Services BIG DEAL They are overrated NO matter what you want to call them

khurtwilliams
khurtwilliams

I see nothing in Apple's advertising or online marketing material which suggests hype. Did Apple say, "this will replace your laptop?". No. Did Apple say, "IT people can do all their work on this iPad"?. No. So what hype are you talking about? Do you mean the hype from other media? That we can agree on,

KeithAlan
KeithAlan

I have to agree with you Palmentto... I think this was way overhyped and still is. Its a cool toy to play with it really is but production... Nah... It's funny how some have to justify it to make them feel better :P

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

...for using "hype" without prefixing it with "over".

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

And Snickers outsold Call of Duty? None of these are "fair" comparisons. I'm not sure where you got your data, but from everything I've read the iPad sales have been extraordinary and has gone far beyond anyone's expectations. In what world does 2,000,000+ sales of a $700 (at @ average) device sold by one manufacturer in well less than a year constitute disappointing sales? And what "direct" competitors are out there for the iPad? Don't get me wrong, as an iPad user I am hopeful that someone will put out a competing product that has even better features than the iPad because that will drive Apple to put out even better and more improved iPads in the future (the sooner the better), but for now there aren't any direct competitors. The few Tablets that have been released so far are NOT direct competitors. To say they are is to compare an iPad to a notebook, and people would be stupid to do that? right?!?!?

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

... is also a far different product at 1/10th the price. That said, CoD is proving to be more a hype-driven flop than the iPad. Nearly everybody I've talked to gripes about CoD's quality, storytelling and overall playability.

Roc Riz
Roc Riz

plausible deniability. When things go horribly wrong with it, the people at Microsoft can just say, "It wasn't OUR idea, it was the idea of the people in the commercials!"

spearson@8herons.com
spearson@8herons.com

Closing the curtains solves the problem for the end-user under most circumstances, but does not fix the underlying technical issue.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

@rimpac99: Did I say Apple invented anything? Well, in many ways they did--they invented a method to make a failed technology work. Again. They invented a way to entice ordinary people to buy into what was once a niche product by making it very easy to use. "My Win7 box doesn't have any of the issues that you alluded to." I didn't allude, it's established fact that the average consumer is guaranteed to have some form of malware on his machine as well as slow performance due to a corrupted registry and other issues. Just because YOU avoid that issue doesn't mean everybody else does. "Few people take the trouble of isolating their gaming which is where most of the issues spring from." I'll agree that few people isolate their gaming--I, however, do. In fact, that's the only reason I use Windows at all, and guess what, that's not where most of the issues spring from. Most Windows users' problems spring from negligent email discipline and worse web browsing discipline. These are the two greatest weaknesses in the environment. Note that I'm not blaming Windows itself here, anyone taking 'reasonable' care can avoid most of the issues--but Windows still has the problem that FLASH, which runs in browsers and emails, is malware's widest highway into the Windows environment. Once invaded, that malware then takes over the machine enough to send replicants to everybody in the user's contact list and expands the botnet. So far this technique has failed on OS X outside of people trying to get something for nothing--people notorious for seeking out 'cracked' software so they don't have to pay for it. And no, the gaming community has not given the Mac platform a miss. More and more games are ported to OS X on a regular basis, though I will accept that the majority come to Windows first. "A quick look at Craiglist will tell you how many iPad users realize that they have paid BIG bucks for a fancy netbook." How about some real numbers? What percentage of these iPads are hitting Craigslist and what kind of prices are they selling for? Keep in mind that Apple is selling 1.2 MILLION iPads a month on average, so one or two on Craigslist is hardly a significant number. "We're already seeing the Android tablet invasion." What? Where? With two exceptions, there's hardly any Android tablets yet on the open market, and one of those was apparently an abysmal failure since Dell has reported any significant sales and is already announcing a new, larger version. Yes, almost all the companies are announcing a release in March or so, but then, the iPad v.2 is due to release about the same time. Again, we'll just have to see how well they all do. If, as has been seen so far, the iPad ends up still having the lower price sans contract, then it still could hold the highest sales numbers compared to any other single brand. Personally, I don't care any more why so many people think a USB connector on the device is absolutely necessary. I've had my iPad for nearly 9 months and I've used the USB adapter exactly once, though I use the SD card adaptor on a fairly regular basis--but not as expanded storage. Nobody else that I know who has one even has the Camera Adaptor Kit and honestly don't miss the lack of USB. The noise, to me, is all from techies who think they know what the Consumer needs--when it's nothing but what the techie himself wants. Just because Android devices are going to flood the market doesn't mean iPad sales are going to slow--Android phones haven't slowed iPhone sales in the least, and if the iPhone does get announced at Verizon, I'm almost willing to bet that Android sales will slow instead. And going back to the original title of this article: Apple did not hype the iPad--bloggers and commenters like you did. Apple did everything they could to keep it quiet.

rimpac99
rimpac99

Let's not forget that Apple invented nothing here - just took the BSD codebase and added some bells and whistles. The Linux/Unix v/s Windows battle has been on for a while now. When a system has few restrictions, it is also open to misuse - apps from dodgy sources etc etc. My Win7 box doesn't have any of the issues that you alluded to. Few people take the trouble of isolating their gaming which is where most of the issues spring from. Mac doesn't have that issue since the gaming community have given the platform a miss. A quick look at Craiglist will tell you how many iPad users realize that they have paid BIG bucks for a fancy netbook. We're already seeing the Android tablet invasion. Wait till the iPad users see that they don't have to buy a $30 adapter to transfer their pics that others come built-in with. All that kooky talk of 'battery drain' being the reason for the lack of USB doesn't wash. But paying $30 to Jobs will gloss over that issue?? Amazing!!

Roc Riz
Roc Riz

Since the inception of Windows version 6.1 (aka Windows 7) Macs have been on the uprise. The tight controls and dictates that Apple imposes on hardware and software vendors, only makes sure that stuff works. Not so in the Windows world. Perhaps a hardware vendor has to get a certification for a Windows driver, but other than that, there is little or no control. How many devices and/or software packages have you purchased for ANY version of Windows that didn't work properly, even though they were "certified" to work with Windows. Personally, I recently purchased a TV tuner card, from ATI, that had the Windows 7 logo on it, stated that it was certified, but did not work. When I went to the vendor's site, they stated that drivers would be available "soon." It was not on the "official" Microsoft site as being supported. This shows me that some companies just slap a Windows logo on a piece of garbage, crank out some old drivers, and state that it works. This is not good for the user community, nor is it good for tech like us, who have to support garbage.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Apparently you haven't been paying attention to the direction the Mac is going, since Apple's computer shares have been growing faster by the year. It wasn't that long ago (about two years) that the Mac had only 2% of the global share and is now over 7% while it's US share has exceeded 10%--which doesn't even hint at the installed base recently measured in excess of 15%. Yes, these numbers are still small by comparison, but their rate of growth points out that people and enterprises are getting tired of the costs involved with maintaining a Windows environment. These costs aren't just the cash ones of paying for hardware and licenses, but also the indirect costs involved with managing and repairing compromised and corrupted Windows installs. It's become cheaper to wipe and restore corrupted hard drives--sacrificing whatever recent data may have been input--than trying to resolve the issue and save the data. Of course, as a result productivity is reduced. So, if you want to imagine the iPad going the way of the Mac, it appears the only direction it can go is UP. We'll just have to see how the market moves this year, won't we?

rimpac99
rimpac99

Such tight controls and arbitrary diktats have never worked in the past. Apple will end up with a sub 5% share of the tablet market as they did with the Mac. A shame really, since they make really cool hardware. Customers will miss out on the economy of scale that comes with large market shares. But the faithfuls will remain - no matter what.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I rely on OpenSSH for all my file transfers outside of flashing firmware updates to my N900. Actually, SSH is the glue that binds most of my systems together; cli access, rsync transfers, connecting out to remote systems.. It would be the first thing added to an Idevice after enabling proper root access. In past when transferring large files, I figured it was just the budget quality of the usb/nic nasbox as I haven't seen issues with dedicated external drives attached by USB. If that's actually an issue in the USB2 standard then it'd be interesting to understand more related details and why it's not yet been fixed in the firmware. Has the SIM slot cover been locked in place with a screw on the Iphone4? The previous two generations simply made it a push-pin rocker arm. The N800 used an SD internal slot beside the battery and an external slot with swing cover for "removable" purposes. I was actually disappointed to see only one removable SD in the N810 and now N900. With the N800, I used the internal SD as the system partition since it was not frequently removed and used the external as general storage since it could easily be removed to view a camera SD on the go or to transfer files too and from the device in absence of a network connection. A very nice benefit; I lent the device to a friend to see if it fit there needs; pull my SD, slap in a fresh one and handed it over. When they eventually upgraded, it came back to me; pulled the SD, slapped in my previous one and my old system was booted like it had never been otherwise. With the N810, I was limited to the external SD slot since my aim was to burn away write limits on the SD card rather than internal flash that render the device bricked at the end of it's write limit lifespan. The SD was not frequently swapped in and out and only removed once accidentally when the machine was booted. The fact that it was there allowed me to increase the system partition beyond the factory limitation and increase the lifespan of the device that probably still doesn't have a months worth of read/write against the internal chips. In term so of your old handspring, cards that can easily be bumped out of position fall in the the "design flaw" categories.. I haven't seen an SD that didn't lock itself in place beyond accidental removal. Even the SD on my Palm T5 held solidly in place without killing the device through dust or moisture. Don't discount the storage medium because a device designer does a poor job of the reader slot. My guess is that the limited use of an SD slot has more to do with it being an extra step of fetching and attaching the reader brick; if it where internal, you or others in general would probably use it more than a few times a month. It may not even be about frequently swapping it out; just increasing your available storage while decreasing wear on the internal chips. I don't know you use the device though so perhaps it would be completely superfluous for your needs. (it's just a wierd feeling the first time you partition an SD card and shatter the idea that it's a single all or nothing blob of storage) Are the port blocks included in the retail package for standard video out, SD and usb? I don't actually know what comes in the Ipad box. It sounds like the 30 pin connector goes beyond the USB spec though dongles seem like they would also cover all those uses even if it came down to a few chips in the cabled dongle. "However, it's very plainly logical that a 30-pin connector is going to have far more capability than a 4- or 6-pin USB connector." I think that point remains debatable.. 30 pins dedicating some pins to each current use depending on what brick is attached to it versus a simple data bus connection that feeds into whatever is attached. In the first, you have all the internal chips and power supporting the external brick. In the latter, you have just the bus chips internally and additional processing or power available in the external brick. Half dozen of one, six twelves the other. Since I'm not the only person with buying authority at home, I may eventually have a chance to muck with the port's abilities and bricks directly. (With Apple my grief has always been more with the company policy than with it's products; I can admit that openly.) "And this brings up yet another point. USB is a 15-year-old communications protocol. It's as old now as the old serial and parallel technologies were when USB was introduced. USB2 and USB3 are essentially incremental upgrades that may limit the data transfer needed for 3D holography, for instance." Age is not really relevant given that there have been ongoing incremental upgrades in the standard. Incremental evolution tends to be much better for stability and the end user rather than constant grand new directions. By the time 3D holographic display is standard and not limited to goofy glasses or both eyes being in perfect health, we may very well be on USB4 or USB5 fully capable of required throughput. If it is a matter of legacy holding the standard back then fair enough; sometimes one does have to start over from scratch. It just shouldn't be the first reaction to a longer usage history. " a completely different protocol that will eventually replace USB. It may not be the 30-pin connector they're currently using " This suggests that Apple would release the port as a standard that can be freely implemented in host devices. As of yet, the 30 pin connector is not a standard outside of Apple and, by requirement, Idevice client accessories. With the rate at which Apple pushes out new mobile device generations, keeping up with the evolution of the USB standard wouldn't be an issue either. I don't think they would replace the existing connector with a usb though either given it's providing compatibility across existing Idevices. They are already locked into there past decision. USB would more likely be an addition rather than a replacement now unless they intentionally decided to break compatibility with previous accessories.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I will admit that I was unaware that the Nokia N900 came with a USB to RCA connector. I am aware that such is available to tie camcorders to televisions and monitors. I guess part of my disaffection with USB is simply the fact that every time I've tried to transfer a video from a camcorder to a computer using the camcorder's Play function, the transfer failed. Sending the raw file over to the computer works fine in just a few minutes, but then the editing software has to re-encode to an editable format which takes up to twice as long as the recorded video itself. I never had that issue with FireWire. I do understand the desire for a built-in SD connector and I do note your mention of the externally-accessible SIM slot, but note that in both the iPhone and the iPad, those slots are capped with a screw locking it in place serving both as structural support and contamination block. The SD slot would be a convenience, but considering Apple's limitations (upon which we will continue to disagree) I don't feel that a permanent slot is necessary as it is used so infrequently. I'm not yet willing to trust the device's operation or my files to such an easily-misplaced card. As a file transfer tool, yes--no worse than the old floppy disks--but not as an equivalent to an external hard drive. I had a Handspring PDA ten years ago that used SmartMedia cards in that manner and while it was convenient, misplacing the card wasn't. I'd prefer a means of ensuring the card is protected from accidental bumps that could unseat it and allow it to fall out. Cameras do this by putting a cover over the card slots. Phones and PDAs don't with the exception of those who put the slots behind the battery.That brings up a different issue which I don't want to go into here. One of my complaints about people asking for excessive ports, and I still include USB among them, is the fact that all those ports are not necessary since the 30-pin port, with appropriate plug-in, can accommodate any one of them at any time. At the moment, I think Apple's concept of using a small plug-in block that doesn't have any dangling wire is more efficient than losing internal space to multiple connectors. This may seem like a quibble, but the iPad gets a remarkable amount of use from a single charge considering how thin it is and how much capability it carries. Adding more connectors will either force the iPad itself to grow larger, or sacrifice space now taken up by that battery. Since I don't use the SD adaptor all that frequently (once or twice a month) I simply can't see a need for a permanent slot--only a desire for one. "... I've frequently asked if you had specs on that 30 pin showing what it can do beyond the abilities of a standard USB port." I, personally, don't have the specs of that connector. However, it's very plainly logical that a 30-pin connector is going to have far more capability than a 4- or 6-pin USB connector. I do know that it permits simultaneous multi-channel audio, video and data transfer while charging the device and can even include FireWire connectivity. What else it can do, I don't know. I could speculate that it may include Intel's new LightStream technology (or whatever it's called) intended to surpass both USB3 and Firewire for speed and reliability. And this brings up yet another point. USB is a 15-year-old communications protocol. It's as old now as the old serial and parallel technologies were when USB was introduced. USB2 and USB3 are essentially incremental upgrades that may limit the data transfer needed for 3D holography, for instance. We're looking at display technologies today that go far, far beyond what we used just ten years ago. But these technologies are still two-dimensional. 3D technology at present is a simulation based on either some form of light polarization with simultaneous 2D images or alternating 2D images requiring a synchronized shutter on the viewer's glasses. True 3D will require a minimum number of virtual pixels equivalent to the cube of the current 2D display. No longer will you be looking at 1920x1080 pixels, but something more like 1920x1080x1080. I'm not saying that video holography is right around the corner, but I think you can see that current USB or DVI is likely to be too slow to truly carry the amount of data needed in real time. Yes, USB is a standard, but just like the iMac foregoing almost all other communications protocols to adopt USB almost 15 years ago, I could see this as a first, tiny step towards introducing or adopting a completely different protocol that will eventually replace USB. It may not be the 30-pin connector they're currently using, but by not restricting themselves to USB, it will make adopting the new technology easier.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I didn't think "pretty much every other device includes a usb" fell into the category of "vegue innuendo" but anyhow.. " Ok, N900, GPS, mobile media players--all use one form or another of the micro-USB connector, primarily as the EU required 'common charging connector.' Honestly, taking that into consideration, I will agree that Apple will probably be forced to do the same, for the same purpose. However, that won't eliminate the 30-pin connector and probably won't affect the reasoning for not permitting a standard USB-A connector that so many commentors have demanded. " I actually didn't think of the EU at all. The passed a requirnment for standardizing ports? Interesting. In terms of USB-A, with Maemo, it is add-on functionality and is limited by what drivers are in the kernel which seems fair; "sure, you can have host mode if you want but it's not officially supported so good luck". I've really only seen it used for keyboards and flashdrives, I think there is also a driver project to get usb mice working in host mode. " Ok, I can acknowledge that USB does have a number of other purposes as well. A question for you: Can you get a USB to VGA or SVGA adaptor? Can you get a USB to HDMI connector? Can you get a USB to Firewire connector? " Would USB to RCA count? Sales Package Contents* * Nokia N900 * Nokia Battery (BL-5J) * Nokia High Efficiency Charger (AC-10U) * Nokia Stereo Headset (WH-205) * Video out cable (CA-75U)

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

... rather than vague innuendo that can be taken too many ways. Ok, N900, GPS, mobile media players--all use one form or another of the micro-USB connector, primarily as the EU required 'common charging connector.' Honestly, taking that into consideration, I will agree that Apple will probably be forced to do the same, for the same purpose. However, that won't eliminate the 30-pin connector and probably won't affect the reasoning for not permitting a standard USB-A connector that so many commentors have demanded. Ok, I can acknowledge that USB does have a number of other purposes as well. A question for you: Can you get a USB to VGA or SVGA adaptor? Can you get a USB to HDMI connector? Can you get a USB to Firewire connector? Up to now, to offer so many different types of connection, you had to have some version of all these different connector types on the device itself. When you're talking about an extremely thin form factor with almost no apparent frame to speak of, to punch a lot of holes in that frame means weakening the structure and allowing a much greater risk of contamination by dirt and moisture. You and others may scoff at such decisions, but Apple has built its reputation on industrial design that works--which means far more than simple looks. By limiting the device to a single type of connector, it reduces the costs of including even one additional type of connector and allows more space for components that are actually functional for the device--like a larger battery. That 30-pin connector, with the appropriate adaptor, can serve as any type of connection needed for the purpose at the time, whether it be photographic, projection, charging or whatever. And as I commented previously, is so far much more reliable in long-term data transfer than USB has proven to be. Ok, so maybe what I said was a veiled insult--it forced you to offer some concrete data rather than vague concepts that were impossible to debate clearly. I've been trying to use reason rather than emotion through this entire discussion--having nothing to do with my brand loyalty. I admit my brand loyalty, but it's due to over thirty years of reliable service from that one brand, something no other brand I know of has managed to attain. Apple's decisions over the years have, even in the non-Jobs years, ensured devices whose operational lives have surpassed the average operational life of any other brand of computer or equivalent device. In fact, this kind of device life span was normal 60 years ago but the concept of 'planned obsolescence' and throwaway technology almost ensures that you have to replace most of your home electronics within two or three years. I have a reason to be loyal to Apple--can you say the same about USB?

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

You needn't get insulting just because I don't share your brand loyalty. So, the Ipad is not meant to be a host device. Again.. whoopty do. My N900 isn't intended to be a host device either, nor are Android mobile devices, nor are GPS units, nor are mobile media players.. Odd that all these things would use a standard usb without rampant abuse like users choosing what to plug into there purchased possessions. Is there something the Apple re-invented port does that could not be done with a standard USB port? Can you grab the specs on that port and list it's abilities in comparison to a micro-usb? Let me try to put my position "simple enough for you to wrap your mind around" (as you say): I accept that using a custom port to the exclusion of all other possible ports was Apple's design decision. What I don't accept is being told that those artificially imposed limitations are somehow a "benefit" for the end user. Don't get me wrong. the Ipad is some very nice hardware which could do a lot if not hindered by it's producer so intentionally. It could have done even more using proven technologies that already existed when it was only drawing on the design tables. Also, questioning Apple's products and policy is not the same as questioning you personally. We needn't make this personal by slinging veiled insults.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Maybe I can make this simple enough for you to wrap your mind around. The iPad was not intended to be a 'Host' device like a desktop/laptop computer, it was intended to be a 'Client' device with standalone capability. At least, that's the way I see it. Too many people here, almost all techies in one way or another, want to see this as an all-out replacement for any form of 'portable' computing--all the while bemoaning the fact that it can't do everything a laptop computer can. Well guess what--It's not! Yes, it was targeted at the netbook form factor, but the netbook was hardly any better as a laptop replacement; most people who bought one used it for mobile web browsing, watching movies, checking email and playing simple games. The drawback is that those netbooks forced you to set it down on some semi-solid, semi-flat surface to use it while a tablet can be held in one hand and used by the other, whether you're left-handed or right-. With the possible exception of external hard drives, exactly how many USB client devices include USB ports of their own to host other devices? A printer might have a card reader, but does it have a USB port? Does your mouse? Your pen tablet (Wacom/etc...)? Your scanner? The iPad doesn't have a USB port because, in my opinion, it doesn't need one and it appears that Apple doesn't think so either. Show me a USB port on a Zune. Then tell me exactly WHY a USB port is needed on an iPad.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

Sure, some usb hardware causes even big boxes to complain; that's still not a reason for the port's absence. That's simply reality; sometimes you plug in a usb device that does not behave well or draws a lot of power (why it wouldn't have it's own external power supply is beyond me though). Either way; this is a user's choice. They plugses in the heavy power use device, they takeses their chances. In terms of drivers; "this device is Windows, Linux, OSX, Ipad compatible" - Done. It's not hard to drop drivers into the regular updates from apple or only certify devices which don't require additional drivers as "works with Ipad". Put a big Ipad sticker on the packaging and get on with it. Instead, apple had to add it's own universal Apple-only port. What specs does it provide that would not be offered by a standard usb port? Data transfer, power source.. and? I just don't see where limiting functionality easily included constitutes advantages for the end user or where reinventing the wheel benefits the user more than using existing standards. It seems to benefit Apple's money harvesting operations far more than it benefits the end user in the short or long term.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

As was noted by Bart I will emphasize that my reasoning is conjecture based on simple logic. Keyboards and mice are not the only types of USB devices out there, neither are flash drives. Some of those devices clearly make even a desktop computer complain due to excessive current draw. However, that isn't the only reason I believe Apple has chosen not to make a USB connection standard equipment on the iPad. One other aspect of USB that neither I nor anybody else has mentioned is that some USB devices need specific drivers in order to work properly. Considering the compact form factor and admittedly-limited on-board storage, even trying to include drivers for devices that don't need to be connected could bloat the mobile OS far more than it needs. Maybe those drivers collectively wouldn't take up all the available space (most assuredly they wouldn't) but if Apple or anyone else tried to accommodate the vast amount of legacy and current USB peripherals, the OS would still be notably larger and slower than it needs to be. Consider a bit of technology history here. The iPad uses a 1Ghz processor with 128 or 256 KB of RAM. Not ten years ago, the average PC ran with an 800Mhz processor and roughly 64 KB RAM. The average hard drive was 20 to 40 GB or less when the iPad goes as high as 64GB of solid state memory. Quite honestly, technology has effectively outstripped the old standards and USB, for being one of those standards, is becoming more a limitation than a benefit. I don't care that USB 3 is just becoming adopted, I've seen where even USB 2 is more hindrance than help with certain large files such as transferring video from a camcorder to the computer. If you try to play a video into your editor from the camera, it almost invariably fails on anything over about 30 minutes--somehow losing enough data that the entire transfer fails and you have to start over. Of course, it is faster to transfer the raw file over, but then it takes just as long if not longer for that raw file to be re-encoded into an editable format by the computer itself before you can even start to view the video. USB 3 may be faster, but will it be more reliable than USB 2, or less? My point is that by limiting the use of USB to certain specific types of devices, Apple ensures a smooth and easy user experience--which enhances their reputation as a users' device, not a techie's device. More and more I see Apple products in use in the home and in public. In fact, just today I watched a participant in the Tournament of Roses Parade use his iPhone to take a picture as he passed the grandstands. I didn't see a single other type of smart phone in use during the entire program.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I don't think it's reason to take to the streets or such but on a tech site it seems like interesting discussion. Personally, I see every other device out there as a proof of concept. USB and SD are standard parts of devices years older than the Ipad without rampant "abuse" from using those ports/readers. The reasons given for this decision also don't hold a lot of water. Because it would drain the battery. Because it would be "abused". Because it would weaken the device shell. These ghosts just don't seem to stand up against the end user benefits discarded. In other industries, where is artificially limiting a product considered a benefit for the consumer where physical harm is not a risk? Argue in the forums.. sure. Outside of the forums.. I simply don't buy since the hardware does not fit my needs.

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

Folks can argue the hardware limitations all day long. The Apple side will say no problem, and the other side will say otherwise. Personally it think the polarized points of view on the devise is stupid, but that's just me. Try to remember that the iPad in it's current form is version one and there was and is a lot riding on it's success for Apple. Why is it so hard to accept that Apple made decisions on the what to include and what not to include on version #1 with the devises succes in mind, or to be more specific, without taking chances on things that could cause problems which would tarnish the devises reputation (far more than not having a USB port). Also, unless someone works for Apple and was included in the discussions about the iPads design, any "reasons" suggested for leaving a USB port off of version on is nearly speculation, just as is all the other points of argument on why Apple did this or did that. Besides, this thread was talking about whether of not the iPad fit the descriptions used in the advertising in it's current form, not whether or not a version that had more fit the descriptions.

rimpac99
rimpac99

None of the Apple aficionados will tell us why it suddenly becomes okay to 'drain battery' when we shell out an additional $30 for the SD-USB thing. I wonder if there is a limit on how long I can keep the iPad turned on. After all, Jobs does seem overly concerned about battery drain and not so much the wallet drain.

Slayer_
Slayer_

If the iPad can't power that, its truly pathetic.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

So someone attaches a USB device which pulls on the tablet's battery rather than a secondary power source; that's the furthest thing from "abuse". That's a consumer doing something with there purchased hardware. The fact that one would suggest this is an abuse of a consumer's rightfully purchased property is the very definition of absurdity. Device owner approaches the Genious Bar; "my battery only seems to last one or two hours when I use my keyboard with it. Is that normal?" Genious Bar tech; "Yes, this is normal. You will get full battery life when using the device without the keyboard or similar power hungry device plugged in. You may also consider the USB powered adapter on that shelf over there. Have a great day. Next!" It's not even a warranty issue. If this is the reason given by Apple, it's outright arrogance on their part if not an insulting degree of cynicism about it's own customers. If this is instead the reason devices by Ipad promoters, it's grasping at straws to spin a disability. "attacking a usb peripheral and reducing the battery life constitutes an abuse of the device and it's usb port".. yeah.. sure.. you'll need to buy me a few more drinks before I can take that explanation seriously.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I agree with you on SD, I even suggested that Apple would probably do that on an upcoming model, though maybe not the one due in March. On the other hand, based even on others' comments in this thread, a USB port would be abused by trying to connect power-hungry devices like conventional mice and keyboards--things that could cut charge life on the battery in half or worse. Keep in mind that while tablets aren't new--Microsoft has been trying to promote them for years--a touch-centric model using a mobility OS is. The conventional and oft-praised 'full OS' version has been an economic failure across the board, including the OS X version a third-party customizing company makes; they are simply too niche and much more limited as true tablets than the iPad and Android models that are making such an impact now. Ok, I won't argue that price is a big factor in that failure, even I'm not willing to spend between three and five thousand dollars for something so critically limited--if full powered--as those devices. Despite being functionally viable, the OS itself simply isn't designed for touch or stylus operation and neither Windows nor OS X have enough touch/stylus-centric applications to create any kind of demand. Quite honestly, I would think Microsoft would have learned its lesson after 10 years and quit trying. WP7 is by far the better choice until they come up with a full-scale touch-only version of Windows that doesn't even look for point-and-click input. Only when you force your developers to support the new paradigm will you begin to see a full-version OS become tablet-ready. Apple appears headed down this track with the touch-centric iPhone/iPod Touch/iPad. Rumors seem to show that OS X Lion may include some of this support which implies that Apple is actively working to migrate from point-and-click to touch, though they've also thought it out enough to realize that not only will the OS have to change, but the hardware as well. Personally, I agree with Jobs when he said that it simply wouldn't be comfortable trying to do touch computing on an upright vertical screen all the time. Apple's at least applied for a patent on a different kind of display stand that lets the monitor stand upright or lower to a comfortable typing/touch angle as needed. Again, this supports the idea that Apple is aiming toward a touch-centric full-powered OS X within the next few years. By then USB may be obsolete, but it would at least be capable of supporting any connected USB device.

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

To me, that looks like Apple treating it's customers as criminals by default who are going to abuse the privileged of having a micro-usb port. Other devices are adding functionality, Apple takes it away and calls "magically innovative". Where is the rampant abuse of other devices who dare give the consumer a standard micro-USB port? But, it's limiting the consumer while calling it "magically revolutionary" that makes me not an Ithingy target customer and neither Apple shareholders or myself sleep poorly at night because of it. With SD, I usually see removable storage as expandable memory by default. Insert SD, mount it to a directory path; memory expanded. Insert SD, mount it to a letter label; memory expanded. Insert SD, Mobile device shows "internal" and "external" now in the file explorer; memory expanded. Insert SD, Idevice provides apps with option of internal or external for their segregated storage use; this would be memory expanded. Mind you, it means you can't make the internal storage size a key price point component as easily. Why enable the consumer when you can limit them and price differentiate your sku. There is much I like about Apple's products but limiting functionality and calling it a benefit is something that's always turned me off. The plausible possibility that Apple would implement an SD slot but cripple it's functionality doesn't help.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I will credit you with thinking reasonably and logically with this question; I would say a thumb drive or SD card would use less energy. However, it seems the majority of detractors who demand built-in USB connectors want to plug in full-powered USB devices such as keyboards, mice and hard drives. Things like these would likely drain the battery far more quickly than a static RAM device. That said, I don't use the USB/SD adaptor more than once or twice a month even as a photographer. The main reason for this is my usual subject matter--fireworks. Shooting with a DSLR, I usually make between 200 to over 1000 captures and load the RAW images into the iPad for review. I honestly don't have a need for more external connectivity than that.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

While I don't doubt the iPad will eventually gain an SD card slot, I don't believe you'll see it used as expandable memory. Rather, just as the SD card slot is used in the MB, it will probably end up used as a simple removable drive for file and image transfer, if even that much. Again, since not all cameras use SD cards, Apple needed a way to accommodate the others and they did so by providing an interchangeable adaptor rather than making two new holes in the frame. Quite honestly, if I'd been in Jobs' place on the design of the iPad, I, too, would not have included a USB port simply because of the misuse it would receive. Not only does the decision save the batteries, but also reduces the risk of warranty repairs.

rimpac99
rimpac99

That is the strangest argument I have EVER heard! Then why make the 'IPad Camera Connection Kit' available for an additional $29.95?? Grease his palms and he gives you a USB port that you can also connect an external hard drive to. Suddenly it is ok to draw power from the USB bus. So that argument about battery life was just hogwash after all. If that is not gouging, don't know what is.

cjshelby
cjshelby

It's my understanding that the IPad has wifi, so you could conceivably transfer data via that interface. If anybody knows, how does the power draw from the wifi circuits compare to the power draw of a USB thumb drive? Or for that matter and SD card?

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

I love having the SD slot on the macbook, it's reason enough in itself to have included on the Ipad. Expandable memory.. whammo.. eash of file copy.. paired with a digital SLR, your set (the first two being reasons why Apple chose not to include it I'm guessing).

cjshelby
cjshelby

...............people who make purchasing decisions solely on emotion. And I wasn't including Bart or for that matter the other commenter's on this thread, as it's obvious to me that we do our homework. Some other witticisms I could have used, but chose not to... Techno-zombies. People who enjoy repeating the phrase "Thank you sir, may I have another!" People who should spend a little more time out of their parent's basement. I'm joking! Laugh a little people! I write every comment with a smile on my face, and it's fun to have some friendly disagreements once in a while.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Plenty. Most USB devices draw power through the USB port, draining battery power much more quickly. By limiting USB connectivity to cameras which are usually self-powered, you not only make image transfer easy but you also eliminate the need for software drivers for all the other devices. Simply put, even if you could connect an external hard drive or other device to the iPad, odds are they won't work unless they have image files on them. By not having the port as standard equipment, you reduce the desire to plug just any old USB device into the tablet. It's not to gouge money from the user, but to reduce or eliminate the excess drain on the batteries and ensure a proper lifespan. If all cameras used SD memory cards, then I could see them making such a port standard in the way they have on the MacBook. But since many cameras use other formats, the USB connector is needed for those other formats.

rimpac99
rimpac99

Since you are a self-confessed Apple aficionado, I have this one question for you: why does the iPad not have a USB port? But if you shell out $29.95 for the SD-USB adapter (that Apple conveniently makes available), viola, you have it. Doesn't make sense. How does shelling out the dough suddenly make USB ok on the iPad? (If, indeed, it is a architectural decision.) Pray, tell me. What is wrong with the USB? Does Jobs know something that the rest of the world doesn't?

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

You ask for clarifications and suggestions. The first one I would offer is to not call people names. The term 'sheeple' is quite derogatory and insulting, whether you intended it or not. Personally, I consider myself a 'fox' (note the handle) and strongly prefer using Apple's PCs and other devices over most of the competition simply due to the fact that over 30 years in the technology business, Apple's devices have given me the best performance bar none. But that's beside the point. No, Apple does not "intentionally cripple their first-gen products." Like most companies, a new product is going to be relatively basic to gain a real-world test of that product. The fact that the iPad is as complete as it is owes to the fact that the technology has been tested for three years in the iPhone/iPod Touch line, so is starting on par with those other products. What a techie may consider 'crippled' can and will be considered very cutting edge by the average consumer. If you compare to any other company, whether automotive, electronic or whatever, the first generation of any all-new model is fairly basic and gains in performance and quality over the years. Finally, personally I find it unlikely that Apple will add a USB socket to the iPad any time soon. I could be wrong, but in all honesty since anything connected to a USB port pulls power from the on-board batteries, Apple simply won't permit external devices to run on an iPad without absolute need and things like mice or external hard drives are unnecessary for a tablet device that's intended to be complementary to a desktop. I could see them adding an SD card slot to simplify photo transfer, but even that isn't critical. If you want to add to the iPad's capabilities, then I would agree on making it easier to transfer working files between the desktop iWork and the iPad's version. I could possibly agree on making it easier to locate and open specific files in their respective apps, but it's not necessary to allow unrestricted access to the on-board file system. All you have to do is watch a consumer trying to locate a file on his PC and realize how that unlimited access ends up screwing his machine over. Consumers need to be led by the hand when it comes to technology. iPhones, iPods and now the iPad are intended to make computing and media consumption easier for the consumer. They're complex devices that are simple to use. Apple makes them that way and the consumer is buying them that way. That's why the iPod took over the digital media player market; that's why the iPhone took off and that's why the iPad is taking off. Meanwhile, the other brands are following Apple's lead with each new product. Maybe the customer isn't always right. Most customers don't really know what they want in a new device because they simply have no concept of what the device is supposed to be. However, once that device has set a standard, then the customer can start to determine what else it needs.

rimpac99
rimpac99

What does the 'iPad Camera Connection Kit' do that the humble USB could not?(Which BTW is just another $29.95 at the Apple store). Why would you allow an 'adapter' for USB if you were against USB connectivity in the first place? (Except to gouge money, that is.) I don't even want to go into the 'app_on_ice' thing that they call 'multitasking'. Pretty expensive for a neutered device, I must say.

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

..someone who uses the term "iPad lovers". I don't recall saying anywhere in my statement that you (or anyone else) shouldn't talk about the iPad. Maybe your read that into my last comment about my response coming from someone who actually owns one. That was to let folks know that my information (about the context of my post within this thread) is based on real world hands on experience. If you're going to read something into what I said, then you should get it right. I mentioned that my comments came from someone who actually owns one so that maybe people who are trying to figure out what the truth is about the iPad (and owning one) could know the opinions of someone who has actual hands on experience with the device. I know for me, when I'm researching the purchase of something new that is a fairly substantial purchase (and for most people $500+ is substantial) I like to read reviews and gather information, but the "opinions" that I listen to the most are from people who actually own the product that I'm looking at buying. That way I'm not taking the "buy it and you'll know how useful it is approach" , but instead I find out how useful it is before I buy it. When it comes to talking about [your interpretation] "you really can't talk about it" comment, actually it's more of a "you shouldn't speak as an authority of what you don't know" kind of thing. You can talk about anything you like, but don't expect people who know that your opinion is flawed due to a lack of information (or a lack of hands on experience) are not going to say that you don't really know what your talking about. What's interesting is that in this case, that didn't even happen (nobody said "you can't talk about it"). All I was saying was that my position came from someone who has one. You read into it "you really can't talk about it".. Believe it or not, it's not all about you. Besides, the topic of my response isn't about how useful the devise is, but instead I was responding to the implication that the terms "beautiful", "magical", "incredible", "amazing" do not fit the iPad (as in over-hype). I'm not sure where your rant about "In the case of the iPad it is 'buy it and you'll know how useful it is'" came from, other than an obvious distain for people who have iPads (as in saying that people who have iPads are really saying "Look I have more money than you do". Really?!?). If you (or anyone else for that matter) would like to know more about the usefulness of the iPad in a tablet form factor (not as a netbook, laptop, or whatever), I'd be more than happy to oblige with a list of uses that, while possible with a laptop, are much more easily done via tablet. My guess is you don't really want to hear that, and if you did ask for the list of uses your "common refrain" response would be something along the lines of "you can do all that with a laptop or netbook", and you'd totally skip out on the fact that the tablet form factor can make a huge difference in certain applications. Maybe the iPad isn't for you. GREAT..!!! Don't buy one! But don't bash people who have them and find them useful.. and dare to say so. Edit: Typo

cjshelby
cjshelby

I was quite sincere with my "no offense" opening, not trying to be sarcastic or sanctimonious at all. Any suggestions on how I could have phrased it differently would be welcome. Now "Bart" says he knows that Apple intentionally cripples their first generation of a product and he's fine with that. OK for him, it's his money,his decision, and (again sincerely) his business. But not doing the simplest thing like adding a USB port, makes me less likely to want to buy one for the same reasons others have stated. I don't believe that "The customer is always right" by a long shot. But whether it's buying a computer product or a car, I hold the purse strings, therefore I'm calling the shots. I buy when I'm damn good and ready to, and I try to not allow "feelings" to affect my purchasing decisions. Again, I was just making an observation not trying to tick anybody off. And btw, I read a blurb that the second gen IPad will have USB ports! I may even buy one by the fourth gen :).

rimpac99
rimpac99

A pretty common refrain from iPad lovers is 'I own one and you dont, so you really can't talk about it'. Well, I always thought you bought a product if you found it useful. In the case of the iPad it is 'buy it and you'll know how useful it is'. I think the throwaway line is meant to be ' Look I have more money than you do'. Most people use it as a netbook unfortunately.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

You title your post "No offense, but..." and wonder why you get a negative reaction? Sheeple? Really?

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

Wow.. didn't mean to hit a nerve or two (dozen). I'm sure that anyone who reads your reply will not see any negativity in it at all, and it was just me. I guess, from my point of view, some folks were just born to be negative, oops, I meant to say very, very discerning. Merry Christmas!

cjshelby
cjshelby

"Doesn't it keep people buying new products?" Blind consumption is what has got this country into the mess it's currently in. "If people didn't want the latest and greatest then would they buy like mad, and don't you think that it's the huge market for electronics that as enabled the inversely proportionate ratio of technology to cost that there has been in electronics over the past few decades?" No, that would be Chinese slave labor and currency exchange manipulation. "Why look down your nose at the very purchasers who have kept you "in electronics since Nixon occupied the Oval Office"? " You really need to read negativity into some folks comments, don't you? If you are "technologically challenged" and are willing to admit to yourself that you are, you're OK by me. But when you think you are an expert on a subject simply because you watched a program on Discovery Channel, or for that matter a few commercials, well that makes you a "neo-maxi-zoom-dweebie" from where I'm sitting. Oh, and you mentioned medical equipment. Medical equipment manufacturers intentionally "cripple" equipment to make it more difficult to use without constantly calling in a technician. They many times fail to provide legally required documentation and access to reasonably priced replacement parts and diagnostic information to the owners of the equipment. They intentionally design proprietary connections and interfaces to innocuous things like batteries and power connectors, for no other reason than to make you come running to them to pay $500 for a part that you could otherwise get at Radio Shack for a couple of bucks. Another reason for the high cost of health care. Maybe that's why Apple annoys me. They operate like a "light" version of the medical device industry in that regard. I've had my experience with the Apple Store" as well. Without going into the whole story, I'm just surprised that they didn't require my Nephew and I to get down on our knees and chant "we're not worthy" numerous times while facing towards Steve Jobs home. That's exactly how we were treated.

cjshelby
cjshelby

That being said, funny how my polite observations on the IPad are reduced to a pissing contest by a "non-fanboy" I never ragged on Apple products. They are what they are, no more, no less. But like many folks I have a problem with the way they do business. If an Apple product meets my needs the best and is the best option in overall value, I'll buy Apple. But as the practical, no BS kind of consumer I am, I have yet to see any Apple product that other products can't compete with, and many times will do the job better at a lower overall expense. Oh and Bart, if you use your OWN legally acquired money and buy an I-whatever for whatever reasons, it's your business. If it later on ends up being an expensive paperweight, oh well. BUT! you are a "sheeple" if you go out and buy "stuff' you can't afford and expect that someone else will take care of you and make it all better, like the bankruptcy lawyers and the government. Sheeple also think that water comes from a faucet, food comes from a grocery store, gasoline comes from a pump, and their liberty comes from a government! And like parakeets, they adore shiny objects in the form of "neat, new" technology!

chrisbedford
chrisbedford

...is the Apple adherents (and Apple themselves) who feel the need to bash the PC crowd. Could be wrong on this chicken-and-egg situation, but the distinct impression is that PC-bashing came first, and the Apple-bashing is *purely* as a result of the sanctimonious attitude that starts with the somewhat smarmy Mr Jobs and filters down through his army of fanboys. Yes, Apple kit is cool and clever, but it's nowhere near as superior as many would have you believe - the psychologists will tell you that constant negative reinforcement of your own position by knocking the competition is a sign of something unhealthy - insecurity, probably. To quote the bard, "Methinks the lady doth protest too much"

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

You bought an iPad and like it. Nothing wrong with that. You presented a reasoned argument for why you like. Nothing wrong with that, either. You described your experiences with others and the device in question. Still nothing wrong. On my part, I have used the device and seen it in use. It's neat, but it's not something I [u]need[/u]. As for 'iHaters', I don't fit in that mold. I don't hate Apple products; I just don't see the need for me to own any of them. I feel that way about many of our modern 'must have' technological conveniences. Of course, many true fanboys do see that attitude as 'hating' their preferred product.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

[i]I won't argue that your own view of the device is that it's less than stellar, but that doesn't mean the device itself is worthless.[/i] At no point did I say the device is worthless. I said I simply see no need for me to have one. [i]1. Why do you feel you have to have such a grossly overpowered machine for email, web browsing, media and other apps?[/i] I do application testing for family and friends. The laptop allows me to install and test those applications, then uninstall them when I'm finished. I also have a couple of older PC games and a console emulator installed and play those when I get the chance. I also have a couple of applications related to hobbies that have no mobile equivalent that I'm aware of. [i]2. If you're driving, I fully understand your argument. However, with new applications coming out to enhance reality, such as the sign-translating app for camera-equipped smart phones, travel can become more convenient.[/i] I don't travel outside the US, I only drive, and I have a GPS that suits my needs perfectly. Why do I need a sign-translating app? Even if I'm driving in Quebec, the signs are in both French and English, and the GPS has maps for all of North America. [i]The concept here is that the tablet is first and foremost a mobility device, not a computing device per se. It is intended to may your everyday life a little easier and more convenient by having the tools you need on hand no matter where you are or what you're doing. [/i] My work requires that I be mobile, whether driving or on my feet. When I'm not doing work-related computing, I much prefer to be sitting somewhere, whether in the recliner at home or at a coffeehouse table. At those times, I don't want tools, I want toys. I don't need it for comparison shopping, I do that before I go out. [i]Quite honestly, I don't like being forced to find a place to set down my laptop just to use it for something simple like locating a bar or restaurant for a meeting.[/i] Again, since I am usually driving to wherever, I have the GPS for this. [i]3. A lot of people do see it as overpriced and underfeatured--yet they then go out and spend more for less by buying a Galaxy Tab or some other device. Even the netbook, while less expensive, is only barely capable of functional use with Windows and still forces you to set it down to use it.[/i] I don't (and won't) own a smart phone. Again, I see no need for it. All I want of my phone is to make and receive calls, and send and receive text messages. My six-year-old Samsung telephone not only performs those functions admirably, it is physically more durable than the newer devices. As for the netbook, were I to purchase one, any Windows install would be replaced by some distribution of Linux, probably Mint or Ubuntu. [i]And your own argument of, ... no need for extra pieces to carry around," is invalidated by your own statement about, "...industry-standard ports built-in." The mere mention of ports implies you're already carrying extra pieces that you may not even need.[/i] I already specified that I was carrying an external drive for media. I also use my laptop to update the GPS through USB. I don't use the touchpad, I use a mouse. All of these are, to me, needs; you may not see it that way. The ports on the laptop allow me to connect what I need [/u]without[/u] an adapter (e.g. the camera kit) that may or may not support what I want to do. [i] Sure, that netbook has more physical storage, but how much of that storage is wasted by the applications you've installed? Very few Windows apps today take less than 1Gb and many take two or more. The average image-editing app for an iPad is only a couple hundred Mb by comparison; a 32 Gb iPad is the functional equivalent of a 120Gb netbook in all things except the OS itself.[/i] Since when is program storage "wasted space"? And what Windows applications are you using that require 1GB or more for initial installation? I use a bare bones Windows install with OpenOffice, Firefox, Thunderbird, related add-ons, and my games, that uses less than 15 GB. The largest thing installed on my personal laptop is the latest release of OpenOffice, and it only takes about 500 MB. My laptop also dual-boots. The remainder of the 40 GB drive is a Linux Mint partition with my browser, email, and media clients. Outside the application testing and games, I can work in either environment. [i]True, YOU don't have to like it--that's your choice. But to argue that because you can't see a valid use for it nobody else should either is simply conceit.[/i] I don't recall making any such argument at all, and can't find it in any of my posts in this branch. I can't even infer it from anything I've posted. [i]Imagination has everything to do with how an iPad or similar device is used because people with imagination continue to find new uses for what some consider to be a waste of technology. [/i] Again, at no point did I say the device is worthless, nor did I say it was a waste of technology. I said I didn't see a need for me to have one. edit: clarify

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I won't argue that your own view of the device is that it's less than stellar, but that doesn't mean the device itself is worthless. 1. Why do you feel you have to have such a grossly overpowered machine for email, web browsing, media and other apps? For the purposes you describe, quite honestly the laptop is far more machine than you need. True, the current lines of compact tablets don't run full OS versions of your favorite apps, but most of those apps have pared down equivalents that serve the basic purposes, including the ability to create and edit images, text, databases and other things. Maybe they aren't the exact applications you prefer, but there is choice out there and the level of choice is still growing. 2. If you're driving, I fully understand your argument. However, with new applications coming out to enhance reality, such as the sign-translating app for camera-equipped smart phones, travel can become more convenient. The concept here is that the tablet is first and foremost a mobility device, not a computing device per se. It is intended to may your everyday life a little easier and more convenient by having the tools you need on hand no matter where you are or what you're doing. Quite honestly, I don't like being forced to find a place to set down my laptop just to use it for something simple like locating a bar or restaurant for a meeting. 3. A lot of people do see it as overpriced and underfeatured--yet they then go out and spend more for less by buying a Galaxy Tab or some other device. Even the netbook, while less expensive, is only barely capable of functional use with Windows and still forces you to set it down to use it. And your own argument of, ... no need for extra pieces to carry around," is invalidated by your own statement about, "...industry-standard ports built-in." The mere mention of ports implies you're already carrying extra pieces that you may not even need. Sure, that netbook has more physical storage, but how much of that storage is wasted by the applications you've installed? Very few Windows apps today take less than 1Gb and many take two or more. The average image-editing app for an iPad is only a couple hundred Mb by comparison; a 32 Gb iPad is the functional equivalent of a 120Gb netbook in all things except the OS itself. True, YOU don't have to like it--that's your choice. But to argue that because you can't see a valid use for it nobody else should either is simply conceit. Imagination has everything to do with how an iPad or similar device is used because people with imagination continue to find new uses for what some consider to be a waste of technology.

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

Doesn't it keep people buying new products? I mean really, if you've "been in electronics" that long don't you think that having that kind of a market is what has made electronics such a boon for so long? If people didn't want the latest and greatest then would they buy like mad, and don't you think that it's the huge market for electronics that as enabled the inversely proportionate ratio of technology to cost that there has been in electronics over the past few decades? Why look down your nose at the very purchasers who have kept you "in electronics since Nixon occupied the Oval Office"?

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

While we may not like it (at all) they have been very successful and profitable with their business model, which is to release a new product that is (dumbed down).. it sells very well and then they release an upgraded version which also sells very well, and then they do it again. Just like the first upgrade to the firmware (4.2) was great and brought functionality that we want, so will the next version of the hardware. Yes, for those of us who bought one the first time around will either do without, or upgrade to the new one, and then do it again. Like I said, many might not like it, but it has worked very well so far. The upside to upgrading hardware is that many of us will list our iPads on craigslist and then buy the new model. That way those folks who thought they were too much new will be able to get one at a "used" price. (I know, I know, even used they will be too much). As for the comments on jumping through hoops to get photos on the iPad I am afraid you are mistaken. I use mine often at work for just that purpose. I go to one of the districts that I cover and do inspections of facilities. After a few days of taking photos I pop the card out of my camera and stick it into the card reader (that attaches to the standard port on the iPad) and viol the photos are imported to the iPad (just like magic, well maybe not, but it was worth a try). Then I sit down with the district manager and review the photos. Works like a charm and is much easier than trying to do the same with a laptop (which is the way I used to do it). The iPad may have it's shortcomings, but that's not one of them. Would it be easier to have a built in port, sure, but all I have to do is plug in a small adapter. How much lazier do we really need to be? Besides, do we really expect Apple to put ports for every type of card? They would have to put in at least four ports to cover the majority of formats (most universal card readers have at least 4 ports). You might say they should at least put a SD card slot built in, but what about all the poor Sony Memory Stick users? It's fine for the many people who do not think the device is a fit for them and choose not to buy one, but there's no need to "justify" your position by bashing the iPad, and especially not by bashing people who have chosen to buy one. When you see an add for Ford Trucks that says they are the best trucks on the road, do you get so uptight about the fact that they might not be the best trucks for everyone? That's why there is a market for Ford, Chevy, Chrysler, Toyota, etc, etc, etc. I'm not really sure why people are so big on attacking Apple, but alas, things are what they are.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I do, very easily on an iPad. Same with my Flip camcorder. I simply plug them in via the USB or SD Card adaptor and download the files. I'm able to view RAW photos in a matter of seconds at full screen and the video takes only a little bit longer. No jumping through hoops and very easy for family or clients to view. Can you say the same for any other device using a mobile OS?

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

..that "I'm a fanboy" because that's the label that many here put on people who are stupid enough to buy Apple products and are actually happy about it. Also, from my point of view iHaters are often just as obnoxious (if not more) than the fanboys.

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

..possibly take offense to THAT..?!?!? I wasn't trying to say that EVERYONE comes up to me, just that there have been people that have come up to me and used all those words. Do you think that Jobs was talking only to techno-snobs in the advertising of the iPad? Or, could he have been speaking to those people who do find the devise beautiful, amazing, etc..? I'm always amazed at the attitudes of people who bash others with words like "sheeple" and think that they are going to be taken as anything but as someone who is negative, frustrated and angry.. and someone who just can't stand to see others with a smile on their face. Not to mention self-syntric and somebody who think's their own point of view is superior. Here's to you and your ilk.. Cheers, and a Very Merry Bah-Humbug to you..!!! P.S. I didn't wait in line or rush out to buy mine

cjshelby
cjshelby

I have been in electronics since Nixon occupied the Oval Office.. One common factor over the last 35+ years is that non-technical folks are attracted to technology the same way that parakeets are attracted to shiny objects :). Sad, but true.

rimpac99
rimpac99

Sorry, but the man himself said it. When it comes to hardware and interface, nobody manages to do it better than Jobs. But to disable a device like that is not on. Try transferring photos from your digicam or source a video, you have to jump through hoops. It is hardly magical. An app for every website? Your iPad will end up looking like an app store.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

who looked and said "Nice toy." :D Your computing choices are your computing choices. That I made different choices simply reflects different wants and needs. I was going to say there's nothing wrong with being a fanboy as long as you aren't obnoxious about it, but the former pretty much implies the latter. ;) You aren't fitting the mold.

cjshelby
cjshelby

those of us who don't think it's worth the money are probably not going to approach those of you who are using one in public to "hem and haw" over how "cool" we think it is. Much less tell you to your face that we think you've wasted your hard earned cash on one. If you bought an IPad and truly think it's wonderful and worth every penny then I'm happy for you that you've made a good purchase for yourself. But if you are one of the sheeple who rushed out and camped overnight to be the first kid on the block to have one, and you're now selling it on Craigslist, then you get what you deserve.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

You can imagine anything you like; I can't imagine me owning one. I've seen it and used it, and just don't see a need for one in my life. First, I use, and have configured, my personal laptop for email, web browsing, media, and my other, preferred, applications. Anything else is for work; I have a corporate laptop for that. The iPad is so locked down, I can't use the media software I prefer, I can't use the browser I prefer, I can't use the email client I prefer, and I most certainly can't use the applications I prefer. Plus, I can't even connect the USB drive that contains my media collection directly to it! Second, I don't compute while moving. I run into things when I'm paying more attention to what I'm doing than to where I'm going. When I do compute, I want to be sitting down, relaxed, and not have to worry about holding anything except my hand on a mouse, my fingers over a keyboard, or my laptop on my knees. Third, did I mention I see it as over-priced and under-featured? Absent the touch screen, I can get a netbook with a larger screen, more storage, more memory, physical keyboard and industry-standard ports [u]built-in[/u], for the same price as an iPad. And I can install my preferred OS and preferred apps, and configure it the way I like. No need to spend extra for accessories, no need for extra pieces to carry around. So you like the iPad. That's great. It doesn't mean that I have to like it as well.

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

I know I'm a fanboy, but to be absolutely honest I have actually heard every one of those words useone except one) by some of the MANY people who see me using my iPad and come up to me and ask me "Cool, is that the iPad?". Absolutely the truth! I don't recal anyone using the word magical, so I can almost give you that one, EXCEPT I can see It in their faces when they see my grandkid watching a movie on Netflix while we wait for our meal to come out (he's 4 so sometimes he needs a distraction in order to stay seated when we are at places that don't have a playground). I've also hear plenty of other words, like "cool", "sweet", "awesome", "Wow", and even a few "how the ####..!!!". I've heard a few people say that they haven't got one yet because they can't afford it, but nearly everyone who says that also says they hope to save up and get one. I don't recall anyone saying anything about not being "worth" what they sell for. Of course, that's just my experience (as someone who actually owns one)..

rimpac99
rimpac99

Those were the words Jobs and Co. used to describe the 'magical' iPad. Its magical alright - in the way it burns a hole in the wallet.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

That's personal preference. But the iPad does a lot more than just email, web-browsing and media. Just because you can't imagine other uses doesn't mean there aren't any.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

He may very well have been prophetic, but in my case, no. I need more from a portable computer than just email, web-browsing, and media. And I HATE iTunes...

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

-- and it appears that he was prophetic in the saying. Sales of both netbook and notebook computers have decreased since the release of the iPad.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

But Steve Jobs did. Steve Jobs: "The iPad Is Clearly Going To Affect Notebook Computers"

Papa_Bill
Papa_Bill

Just sayin' "hype" comes from "hyper" which of course *means* "over". It's just redundant, that's all. Of course, if it comes from "hypo", then we're all wrong.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I never really thought the iPad was over hyped. I thought the iPhone was, but not the iPad. If that's what you are inferring.

Justin James
Justin James

... but the REALLY odd thing, is that I know Bart, he's very close friends with my mother, and he did the photos for my wedding. :) Talk about "six degrees"... J.Ja

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

You got your Irmite, your Lexingtonian, and your Batesburger. Is that a choice of entrées or something much less appetizing?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

How are things in the Land of the Mall? Don't you have some okra to boil? :D

Slayer_
Slayer_

Except for ya know, me, cause I got the god complex :D

Slayer_
Slayer_

Minor nit, I am not really IT, I am a developer. I am allowed to hate users (practically expected of me) and have a god complex.

BBaldwin803
BBaldwin803

Spoken like a true blue stereotypical "God Complex" endowed IT professional (not that all IT pros are like that, but there is no shortage of them, and at least one in every IT department). Full of opinion but short on patience and facts. The kind of thing you'd expect to hear from someone that can't stand dealing with "users" because they are just so stupid. That kind of response is either intended to make you "appear" right/superior without having to bother to actually present facts, or it's just laziness (or both).

Slayer_
Slayer_

There is been a large number of TR blogs answering every question you asked me.

Slayer_
Slayer_

When they changed and merged with Enix, which had some good RPG's of their own, Soul Blazer comes to mind. Square soft had a few good RPG's but final fantasy was their flag ship product that they always put the most support behind. Then we got Final Fantasy 11 which was online, and was not that popular, and then got crushed by games like world of warcraft. 12 is in my opinion, awful, I can't even finish it, 13 had mixed reviews. If you want a character who has stood the test of time, check out Mario.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I played different versions of Final Fantasy up to version 9, I believe. While the concept itself may not be different, the style and graphics have greatly improved and from what I understand the quality of play has never degraded. However, Call of Duty has only gone through four or five iterations, so there are still a lot of storylines available and the quality of the game--playability and graphical--should be as good if not better than the previous. By the reviews of both professional reviewers and gamers I know personally, the quality itself of this latest CoD is the pits. It's surviving only on the reputation of its predecessors, not on its own merits--of which there are few. Now, how can Nintendo keep Final Fantasy going for as long as it has with high quality if, as you say, players get sick of it? CoD isn't dying from loss of interest--the millions sold in such a short time proves there's high interest. On the other hand, if the company tries to do another CoD, I'm betting sales will be abysmal at first simply because of this poor-quality example. If CoD wants to regain its reputation, the next version is going to have to be perfect in every way on release.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Well of course its a flop, when you make 1000 versions of the same basic game, people get sick of it. Its a cash cow that they are milking for every last drop. The need for speed series comes to mind, same with Final Fantasy.

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