Emerging Tech

The top 10 tech companies in the 2008 Fortune 500

This week, Fortune Magazine released its data on the 2008 Fortune 500, which will officially be released when the May 5 edition of the magazine hits the newsstands. Here are the top 10 technology companies on this year's list, plus the list of the top 10 most profitable companies in tech.

This week, Fortune Magazine released its data on the 2008 Fortune 500, which will officially be released when the May 5 edition of the magazine hits the newsstands. Below are the top 10 technology companies on this year's list (note that companies such as AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint are not included because they are part of the telecom industry).

The Fortune 500 is ranked based on total revenue. The amount of 2007 revenue for each company is listed in parentheses.

  1. Hewlett-Packard ($104.3 billion)
  2. IBM ($98.8 billion)
  3. Dell ($61.1 billion)
  4. Microsoft ($51.1 billion)
  5. Intel ($38.3 billion)
  6. Motorola ($36.6 billion)
  7. Cisco Systems ($34.9 billion)
  8. Apple ($24.0 billion)
  9. Electronic Data Systems ($22.1 billion)
  10. Oracle ($17.9 billion)

Fortune also did a special breakout on the most profitable companies in the tech sector. That list looks a little different.

  1. Microsoft ($14.1 billion)
  2. IBM ($10.4 billion)
  3. Cisco Systems ($7.3 billion)
  4. Hewlett-Packard ($7.3 billion)
  5. Intel ($7.0 billion)
  6. Oracle ($4.3 billion)
  7. Google ($4.2 billion)
  8. Apple ($3.5 billion)
  9. Qualcomm ($3.3 billion)
  10. Dell ($2.9 billion)

Notables who didn't make either list?

  • Sun Microsystems
  • AMD

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

15 comments
jblanch882
jblanch882

I realize this list is a top 10 "earners" list. But I wonder how these companies would rate in a real Total employee satisfaction list? Having just left one of the top 10 companies this week. I can tell you there were not a lot of "Happy Campers" on our account. Along with massive layoffs, employee morale at an all time low. I could see them dropping off the list in the next year or two..

rohitkaveeshwar
rohitkaveeshwar

well.. pretty obvious... n why the hell i apple.. at 8th posi.

John Quillen
John Quillen

Dunno what their total rev is, but making the bottom list without making the top is something.

chuckstar76
chuckstar76

Here's a percent ratio of the Profit to Revenue, of the companies listed in both lists, highest first. Name Rev Prof Profit/Revenue MS 51.1 14.1 27.59% Oracle 17.9 4.3 24.02% Cisco 34.9 7.3 20.92% Intel 38.3 7 18.28% Apple 24 3.5 14.58% IBM 98.8 10.4 10.53% HP 104.3 7.3 7.00% Dell 61.1 2.9 4.75% To have over 1/4 of revenue as profit is quite staggering isn't? Mind you how does this compare to Oil and Gas companies like Shell and BP?

Ajax4Hire
Ajax4Hire

Who would have thought that making excellent calculators would be so profitable. I nearly cried the day my HP-11c finally gave up the ghost. I still keep it in pieces on my desk, I told myself I wouldn't cry, I miss my HP-11c, I gotta go....

Komplex
Komplex

Who would have thought they would still be profitable in 1992.

pepoluan
pepoluan

Make excellent *anything*, and keep making them excellently. And people will come back. In droves.

dca3333
dca3333

Here's the math for profit margin percentages (=profit/revenue): Microsoft 28%, Oracle 24%, Cisco 21%, Intel 18%, Apple 15%, IBM 11%, HP 7%, Dell 5%. Looks like software companies tend to have higher profit percentages (Microsoft, Oracle)and hardware companies tend to have lower percentages (HP, Dell).

jheaton
jheaton

What really bothers me about this list, is that companies such as Apple, with a profit of $3.5 Billion dollars, is laying off so many people. How in the world can they actually justify that kind of action?

tungstendiadem
tungstendiadem

The reason for higher profit margins for software companies as opposed to hardware companies has to do with the availability of talent. There simply are more senior level engineers in hardware. This makes for a relative barrier to entry in the software market as established firms can still attract the best talent with their larger profits. Eventually software engineering will becomes as prevalent an engineering discipline as electronics and the margins will shrink as laid off software engineers find and found new firms.

admin17
admin17

Of course, manufacturers tend to have lower margins because of all those annoying raw materials they have to purchase! :D It is interesting to see Cisco with such a healthy margin. Are they diversifying that much into software?

RationalGuy
RationalGuy

Apple employs people in order to make more money for Apple's investors. They didn't keep enough of their revenue as profit, so they have to lower expenses. Some jobs were cut, some were moved to less costly sites. No company is obligated to offer anyone employment for life. Employment is a mutually convenient arrangement between employers and employees. Would it sicken you if employees quit Apple to take a better-paying job at another company?

tungstendiadem
tungstendiadem

I just wanted to say I agree, and your point about taking a better paying job really serves to illustrate the point that employer employee relations are about the alignment of goals which is fundamental to the nature of the free market.

Editor's Picks