Leadership

Video: Five questions to help you get your IT project funded

If you're having trouble getting the green light for IT projects, then this episode of Sanity Savers for IT Executives can help. It provides five questions to ask yourself before presenting your project to the CEO or the management team.

If you're having trouble getting the green light for IT projects, then this episode of Sanity Savers for IT Executives can help. It provides five questions to ask yourself before presenting your project to the CEO or the management team.

About

Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

11 comments
Deepjyoti
Deepjyoti

Excellent work.........i am happy with this.Stock Price

hyma_snist
hyma_snist

Great tips Jason. Thank you.

mbodoh
mbodoh

Rather than make me watch 3 minutes of video, would have been nice to just list them in text that I could read in just a few seconds with an option to view the video.

ozchorlton
ozchorlton

I too would like to see this as text, with an option to view the video - it just suits the way I work :-)

vindog
vindog

Would be more helpful if I understood the semi-conductor industry's "leverage points" since that's where I sit. Any examples?

ntaylor1
ntaylor1

Thanks Jason, this was most informative; couldn't of come at a better time. Would most certainly like to dig deeper on this subject.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Original post: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=767 What advice can you share for getting IT projects approved by the CEO or the management team?

ibogorad
ibogorad

Jason, all good points very well presented. Out of the hundreds of tips I personally accumulated through some small and large battles (picked randomly): - Develop the highest level of trust possible with the leadership team. This is only possible when they know that you understand this business as well as they do. - Know by heart how the key decision makers in your company make decisions. What is their individual appetite for financial data, high level picture, "touchy-feely" factors? Build your case accordingly. - Understand real, not advertised, concerns and priorities of decision makers. Appeal to their personal interests as much as possible. Build alliances and bounce ideas off the key people to test if you are going in the right direction. There is tons more, enough for a seminar or three (which is what I do with this stuff). Cheers, Ilya Bogorad Principal, Bizvortex Consulting Group Inc ibogorad@bizvortex.com

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Ilya - Thanks for adding those. Would you be interested in writing an article on this topic?

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

I like your articles. I was just thinking this would be a great topic to explore further for an upcoming article.

ibogorad
ibogorad

... blog posts here on Techrepublic are devoted to this subject. There are three entries already posted, filled with practical advice. The next entry will be a primer on strategy, since everyone says this word a lot. Then, perhaps 15 entries on business cases, everything there is to know about. Here is the link: http://search.techrepublic.com.com/index.php?q=bogorad So... it is already happening. Cheers, Ilya

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