Networking

Video: Four obstacles to implementing VoIP

Voice over IP is growing in popularity but fewer than half of all businesses are using VoIP because of a few drawbacks. This episode of Sanity Savers for IT Executives discusses the biggest obstacles standing in the way of widespread corporate adoption of VoIP.

Voice over IP is growing in popularity because companies are attracted to its potential for saving money on long distance and international calls. Still, fewer than half of all businesses are using VoIP because of a few drawbacks. This episode of Sanity Savers for IT Executives discusses the biggest obstacles standing in the way of widespread corporate adoption of VoIP.

For those of you who prefer text to video, you can go to the video player page for this episode and click "Full Transcipt," or you can read the original article that this episode was based on:  Four obstacles to implementing VoIP by Deb Shinder.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

19 comments
bberry
bberry

All of the information and comments seem to be refering to a premise based VoIP system which is good for companies with a well versed IT department. For those without, hosted VoIP is a viable alternative with almost all of the same benifits but without the issue of not wanting to tag voice packets because that is a part of the QoS required to provide a high voice quality. It may require additional bandwidth to the internet, but all benefit from that. I have been involved with about 50 installs in he past 12 months and all are working well. However, as the video indicates, costs are still a factor but they can be offset by the fact in-house manpower is not required. Good for 3rd party IT companies though.

jkn
jkn

I couldn't agree more - but often there is really no need for additional bandwidth as most applications (mail, browsing, FTP, etc.) are not time critical and should just wait the few milliseconds required for the VoIP data to get through. Dynamic QoS is all which is needed. I am involved with another company that uses hosted PBX with SNOM phones and it all works perfectly.

Sepius
Sepius

I am a comms tech, and we put forward a multi site rollout with VoIP trunking using a centralised reception. They dropped it from advise of the IT because they also went virtual machine and the bandwidth could not be guaranteed, even with QoS (IT did not want to prioritise our packets over theirs). Result is they lost all the centralised features. VoIP is a fantastic product, but it cannot be sold with savings anymore, just the extra features that can be carried on the network, but I am increasingly separating the voice network from the data and sometimes physically as well to be able to coexist with increased data loads now hitting the networks.

jkn
jkn

Its kind of stupid not to be willing to add some priority to VoIP packets. The data load is quite small compared to the rest of the traffic (~80Kbit/s). The problem obviously is if you statically have to allocate the mex required bandwith - a 1000 users site will then eat up all available bandwidth. The allocation has to be done smarter than that - automatically. I guess separating networks is maybe even more expensive than staying with the old PSTN system?

gjlowes
gjlowes

You sound like an IBM marketing rep back in the 1980's - explaining to all of us why IP (802) networks wouldn't work, and we should stay with SNA (VTAM, NCP = proprietary). What about the very real, very positive aspects of VoIP? Universally available, at a fraction of the cost, and rapidly improving quality, reliability? Enough with the FUD (fear, uncertainty & doubt). Encourage all CTO's to embrace and adopt VoIP !

melekali
melekali

...be switching over to VOIP at an enterprise level. The cost, while a lot, is minuscule compared to upgrading our existing phone infrastructure.

acabot
acabot

And for heaven's sake stop saying "VoIP" as a word! It sounds affected. Just use the letters, as in "V-O-I-P". After all, you don't say "Ticip", you say TCP/IP.

andrea
andrea

Hmm.. I like Ticip... I think I'm gonna start using it. :-P

uberg33k50
uberg33k50

Jason, I think you bring up things to consider but couldn't you guys offer content in print form? I really didn't have six minutes to listen to this...in printed form I could have read it faster and skipped over stuff I already know.

jasonhiner
jasonhiner

For those that prefer text, I put a link to the original article and a link to access the transcript for the video. We still do far more content in text than video but we turn some of our best tips into videos because there are users who prefer audio/video. Nevertheless, even with our videos we always offer the text alternative.

andrew.quee
andrew.quee

I prefer simple text or PDF myself. Our corporate policy is to avoid 'frivolous' use of streaming video and other high-bandwidth use. While this article can be considered work-related, I prefer to avoid unnecessary conflict as watching videos is deemed 'unproductive'. Unless something is being demonstrated that really requires video, I prefer to save articles and read them during breaks/down time. I can also skim through them and determine how appropriate and useful they are.

rjcirtwell
rjcirtwell

As a past telephone tech (I'm currently a network admin) I can tell you that no telephone call is "secure". A butt-set is a pretty inexpensive piece of equipment and is easy to use. Walk in to a company with one of these hanging off your belt and you can get in almost any where. Sophisticated equipment can be used to wire-tap any PSTN line. Just ask the Dept. of Homeland Security.

wdewey@cityofsalem.net
wdewey@cityofsalem.net

PSTN lines require physical presence to tap and requires each line to be tapped individually (unless the trunk is tapped and that would require much more sophisticated equipment and knowledge). VOIP does not require physical presence to tap and if one call can be tapped then all calls can be tapped. Bill

Lexxus
Lexxus

I think the best part of this video were the bloopers. But I would have appreciated this more in print so I could skim and cover what I did not know.

tony
tony

I love the videos, and always watch through to the bloopers. For the predictable "I want to see it in writing" comment (I though I'd post one as a joke, but wasn't fast enough), you may note that immediately above the video player window is this paragraph with links: "For those of you who prefer text to video, you can go to the video player page for this episode and click ?Full Transcipt,? or you can read the original article that this episode was based on: Four obstacles to implementing VoIP by Deb Shinder." Keep up the good work!

BigFun
BigFun

1. VoIP, at an enterprise level, does not travel acoross the internet. 2. Security, VoIP is as secure as your network - if you do not secure your network then you've got bigger issues. You need to do your homework before you start giving this type of advice. Where do you think communication technology is moving to?

jkn
jkn

Its easy to criticize but often much harder to provide concrete feedback I notice :-) Anyways, I have been using VoIP for the last 4 years between our four sites (Brazil, Moscow, Copenhagen and Silicon Valley) and they have saved us tons of money for all our internal calls. Security hasn't been considered a problem as we ran this over VPN (IPSec based) site2site connections. Quality on the other hand has been very problematic - often we have gotten cut of, other times the classic submarine sound which made it impossible to use. Then we installed a bandwidth manager with User Load Balancing and Dynamic QoS on all sites and suddenly sound quality was excellent. The box is quite inexpensive and the level of IT skills required was nothing more than our single IT guy could handle.

melekali
melekali

Your comments from your experience make a lot of sense. Thanks for balancing the theoretical conversation.

curtis.mulcahy
curtis.mulcahy

1.At an enterprise level or any level of business, voice can be riding on any media available. For instance you can have people working from home with a softphone or IP Phone via their VPN connection to the office, this as we know rides across the internet. 2.Do you encrypt your internal/external FTP traffic? What he is referring to is the fact that now the voice can be encrypted from the IP Phone to the gateway. This now secures the voice traffic through the entire media path, so that someone with a packet capture device on your network cannot play back the captured packets to hear the call.

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