Leadership

Video: Legal terms all IT leaders should know

People love to sue businesses, and since so much evidence is now created or stored on computers, lawsuits invariably require the involvement of IT. Thus, here are the most important legal terms that all IT leaders need to know.

Unfortunately, we live in a society where people love to sue. They love to sue other people and they especially love to sue businesses. Since so much evidence is now created or stored on computers, lawsuits involving companies invariably require the involvement of its IT staff. If your company becomes involved in a lawsuit, chances are you will have to work with lawyers.  This episode of Sanity Savers for IT executives explains some of the important legal terms that IT leaders should know if your company is involved in a lawsuit.

For those of you who prefer text to video, you can click the "Transcript" link underneath the video or you can read the original article from Calvin Sun that this episode was based on: 10+ legal terms you should know if your company is involved in a lawsuit.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

14 comments
donnakline
donnakline

This is a remarkably good presentation; clear, accurate, and to the point. Bravo!

Got that tee shirt
Got that tee shirt

Good info for that can also be used when law enforcement authorities get involved.

GreenPirogue
GreenPirogue

Very good basic info when involved in a lawsuit. I have not been involved in this in quite some time, but the last time I was, we contracted with an IT professional who did this sort of thing all of the time. That way, we knew what to give during the discovery phase, and it was much cheaper than if we had done this ourselves because (1) it would have taken time to go through exactly what was requested and in what format, and (2) we did not screw up what the lawyers wanted.

vesuvana
vesuvana

FYI There are only 5 terms listed in the transcript.

flipendo
flipendo

Especially since the video (and all streaming media) is blocked by the IT department where I work. I'm guessing the transcript link is embedded in the video? I don't have access to that, either.

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

I prefer it over the videos due to connection issues. Anyways, I thought claw-back was an interesting term. I woner if there are some good examples of that actually happenning. How can you be so sure that the other side has really destroyed the info?

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

I prefer it over the ivdeos due to connection issues. Anyways, I thought claw-back was an interesting term. I woner if there are some good examples of that actually happenning. How can you be so sure that the other side has really destroyed the info?

rgkrishn
rgkrishn

I used to read many techrepublic articles and when they changed to video format it was a huge waste of time and I stopped even clicking on these links - transcripts allow me to quickly read just what I want instead of waiting painfully for video to wade through the fluff talk.

whopper
whopper

I have been ignoring any TR articles that linked to video. If we continue to get a transcript, I'll actually look at them.

brian
brian

...A best effort to collate and preserve the data, and provide it in a format usable by the attorneys from either side. Since no one had details on "whom" or "what" was of interest, *everything available* had to be preserved from the timeline relevant to the issue. Additionally, how and when it was archived, and the reason behind considering it worth archiving had to be noted. I wound up purchasing thousands of dollars worth of hardware and software to manage multiple Terabytes of historical information; a tape library, a separate disk array and backup software to recover entire computer backups at their behest. Things like Database Server backups need to be a part of this too. I wish I had a minimal checklist or even a wiki of items to preserve, suggested or recommended formats to preserve it in, and, of course, especially what you have mentioned, how to properly communicate with your company's attorneys. Let's just say you should make sure your IT group gets "quality time" with the attorneys, and not just one conference call either.

Jellimonsta
Jellimonsta

More acronyms for my arsenal. :D BTW Jason, make sure you don't mix your detals with your doodads. :p ;\

aloyens
aloyens

Nice & Clear for a basic knowledge that everybody should be aware of. I'm sometimes involved (as an IT) in international lawsuits during what attorneys call 'investigation', which can most probably be related to e-Discovery in your presentation. We receive f.e. Gigabytes of e-documents of all kinds / all formats / all languages / all kinds of attachments and we must index them on their textual context to make investigation easier. Additional services are provided like : flagging documents already treated (to avoid double work), recording the "who and when", computing the amount of work by language (to plan resources knowing foreign languages), restoring the chronology, avoiding duplicates (mails sent to a distribution list) ... Alain LOYENS aloyens@ask.be Belgium/Europe

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