Patents

Video: U.S. CTO outlines Obama's IT strategy in health care

During his recent tour of Silicon Valley, U.S. CTO Aneesh Chopra described the Obama administration's plan to spur technology innovation. Watch Chopra speak about IT's impact on health care in this short video clip.

During his recent tour of Silicon Valley, U.S. CTO Aneesh Chopra described the Obama administration's plan to spur technology innovation through investment, align the nation's domestic priorities, and upgrade the government's own operations.

Watch this three-minute video clip from Chopra's talk at a Churchill Club event at the Computer History Museum in Menlo Park, California, where he put special emphasis on IT spurring innovation in health care.

This comes at a time when leaders in Silicon Valley are very concerned about U.S. government policies having a negative impact on the world's technology epicenter, as Bob Ackerman expressed in the ZDNet piece Government is killing Silicon Valley innovation.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

9 comments
reisen55
reisen55

IT projects on a truly huge scale take ages, years to implement correctly and it is easy to say that hospital and medical systems of SOOOOOOOO MANY different types and styles can be SEAMLESSLY mended together. WOW, WHAT A DREAM. Pipe dream. How many times have we heard of government systems ALONE that do not talk to each other? Myriad complexity there and very few do. And we should expect it to be any easier for MEDICAL SYSTEMS of a thousand flavors to talk to each other? Easy to say as President, sounds great - wow, tech can do ALL OF THAT?????????? Real world - tech cannot do it. Not government tech and not independent tech nor corporate tech like CSC and I have seen what they can do first-hand. Pipedream. Smoke it.

jck
jck

It's called EDI. One of the worlds largest shipping companies I contracted with was using this almost 10 years ago when I was there, and they were doing information exchange with over 3 dozen TL and LTL freight carriers in the USA to get them ALL the same information. It's not as damned hard as the critics make it out to be. One standardized document for data exchange, and voila...it's done. Information exchange is not that hard. Getting the 15 person medical expert panel together to discuss and decide will be the hardest part.

reisen55
reisen55

that government computers, for the greater part, seamlessly share data? Naive

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Getting the Legal Side of Medicine o agree with the Proposed Treatment method when it's new is the hardest thing possible. Thankfully that's not a job of IT though. ;) Col

shaz
shaz

Medical IT is one very important part of reducing overall healthcare costs. In order not to repeatedly perform costly tests, the results must be readily available to multiple healthcare providers. HL7 is actually an established, standardized protocol that the better electronic healthcare record systems communicate. It is not far-fetched to bring together many disparate systems. By the way, the VA systems has one of the most advanced electronic medical record systems in use anywhere and it has been developed in the open-source model.

jck
jck

And if their systems were developed with taxpayer dollars, then it's public information. Anyone can get the software and implement it.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

...this is cited as a case study demonstrating a large scale IT project success: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VistA From what I remember reading for class, quality of care indicators all rose after the implementation of this system.

jvpro
jvpro

I work in IT for a medical billing organization. We have been going more and more paperless in the last couple of years. We have many doctors' offices and a hospital that use the same computer systems for patient data. The stimulus money should help with going more paperless and make it easier to store, share, and retrieve data. It is going to be interesting to see how the modernization of health care IT systems plays out in the next few years.

Editor's Picks