Hardware

Video: What IT leaders need to know about virtualization

Virtualization is having a major impact on IT infrastructure, and its influence will likely grow in the next 5-10 years. Thus, there are some basic principles about virtualization that all IT leaders should understand, as this episode of Sanity Savers for IT executives explains.

Virtualization is having a major impact on IT infrastructure, and its influence will likely grow in the next 5-10 years. Thus, there are some basic principles about virtualization that all IT leaders should understand, as this episode of Sanity Savers for IT executives explains.

If you prefer text to video, here's the original article that this episode is based on:

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Jason Hiner is the Global Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Global Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He is an award-winning journalist who writes about the people, products, and ideas that are revolutionizing the ways we live and work in the 21st century.

10 comments
jasonhiner
jasonhiner

Original post: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=877 What other functions do you use virtualization to handle?

CG IT
CG IT

I've been on 3 large scale deployments of VM on desktops for businesses in merging. One very recently for a large financial institution that was bought out by another. The deployment was just putting the buying companies system over the top of the existing desktop system via VM. Personally, there's a lot of hype about VM [virtual machine]. Unless your deploying hundreds of desktops at multiple sites over a weekend, virtual machines over an existing operating system like XP for desktops can't really see it's usefullness outside of the test environment

Keith Hailey
Keith Hailey

I've been listening to the hype about VM. I played with it several years ago but the overhead back then was a bit more than I liked. Now, I can't for the life of me think of any reason that I would need a virtual machine on a personal system. Virtual desktop, yes, but not an entire machine (or two). So, for the home user, there is really no use for VM, is there? Other than something to play with or spend money on. Really no need execpt for the hobbyist? Thanks, Keith

bmacias
bmacias

Virtualization is great for staging or proof of concepting applications. It allows you to quick build servers and through them away after you done.

ben
ben

We use it for offsite backup/recovery, and use workstation for wan development since it has the ability to throttle network connectivity to multiple machines. (Very nice feature). We also have 2 macs that run fusion, to get access to Windows apps.

will
will

I was wondering if setting up a Linux Desktop computer with Windows XP Pro virtualized would make Windows more secure. Has anyone tried this?

dwilga
dwilga

Depending upon a host to make the guest virtual machine more secure is really not what virtualization is all about; at least not with the consumer level products like VMware Workstation. Essentially, (right now anyway)there is no way to use the host as a router, which is what you are really asking for. I can't speak to other vendors, but your best bet for this type of solution in a VMware environment is their ESX product. With that critter you could create a Linux virtual machine and an virtual network switch that would serve to isolate the Windows client by using the Linux VM as a router. The Linux VM would be connected to the default VMware virtual switch and thus a "real" NIC; the second VMware virtual network switch would have no "real" NIC at all, but be connected to (only) the two VM's.

Steven Warren
Steven Warren

When you are running XP pro as a vm with internet access, it will have the same flaws as if you werent running it as a vm. No difference.

dwilga
dwilga

Virtualization makes it infinitely easier to support disaster recovery. Rather than having to use Acronis, Ghost, or a variety of other imaging applications to perform "bare metal" style recovery onto replacement server hardware, VM's make it possible to restart a complete virtual server on almost any hardware. The only caveat is that the replacement hardware needs to have the same general CPU (e.g. AMD or Intel). Disaster recovery for VM's also means that VM's which are hosted by a server connected to a SAN array can be replicated by the array hardware itself to another storage array. This means that after a fire, flood, or other disaster in the primary datacenter, a replicated VM can be restarted (albeit in a crash recovery state) on the destination array either across town, or across the globe.

ben
ben

To follow up theres multiple less expensive apps out there in open source and commercial to assist in this. Datacore is a great product for real time wan sync over t1 etc. For the strong willed, look at drbd w/iet , openfiler, freenas as low cost san solutions that offer mirror/sync utilities.

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