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Why Google Buzz confirmed our two worst fears about Google

Google Buzz has evoked a major backlash against the company from thought leaders in the technology world. Here are the two reasons why.

Google is not accustomed to being mistrusted by users and flogged by the tech press, but that's exactly what's happened to the search engine giant in recent weeks since the release of its new Google Buzz social media product.

Companies like Microsoft, and to a lesser extent Apple, are used to releasing new products and seeing them publicly attacked and belittled. Those two companies are typically patient enough to take feedback, integrate it into the product cycle, and then wait for users to get on board.

Google, on the other hand, has been something of a golden child in the tech world in the past decade. Its search engine has become the default home page of the Internet, and the company's focus on engineering over profits has endeared it to users around the world.

However, as I suggested in my article How Google became the George Washington of the Internet, Google's joy ride with users could be coming to end. In fact, it may have officially happened with the introduction of Google Buzz. We could look back at this product launch as the turning point of Google losing its innocence.

So, what's the big deal about Buzz? Here are the two reasons why Google's actions with Buzz have raised so many eyebrows and confirmed some of our darkest fears about Google.

1. They'd use our data in ways we didn't authorize

Google is sitting on the largest collection of personal information on the planet (and very likely, the largest in the history of the planet). Google knows far more about you than the government does, for example. As a result, users tacitly trust Google to only use their information in ways they explicitly need for accessing Google services such as search and email.

The fear has always been that Google would use our personal information in other ways that we never authorized. Google has tried to assuage these concerns with its privacy policy in which it states that it anonymizes "IP addresses after 9 months and cookies in our search engine logs after 18 months."

When Google Buzz first launched, it surprised users by turning their contacts that they emailed most often in Gmail into Google Buzz friends. By default, this list of friends was exposed to the world through the person's Google Profile and these automatic friends were also treated to access to the person's Google Reader, exposing the stuff they were reading.

These kinds of surprises were what sent a lot of people (including yours truly) looking for ways to turn off Google Buzz within a few hours of it going live.

2. They'd eventually get careless about privacy procedures

In creating the automatic friends list in Buzz, Google was attempting to streamline the process of setting up a new social media site. The product was trying to be helpful and keep users from needing to look up and add their friends on yet another social network.

That was a laudable goal, but it's shocking that no one at Google sensed the massive privacy implications of this move since it was tied into a public-facing profile. For many people, that Google account tied to Gmail and other private services was not one that they wanted to expose out in the wild. It was simply too closely connected to valuable data.

Google claimed to have tested Buzz internally leading up to the launch, so it's surprising that no one picked up on the contact issue and that the feature that went live. Of course, it got rolled back by Google programmers after an international outcry from users.

Beyond the bit about anonymizing data, Google has never divulged many details about its internal policies for protecting user privacy. Google's promise to users has always been something like: "Trust us. We'll always keep the needs of users as our top priority."

However, in the process of trying to make users the top priority and create a better user experience, Google was extremely careless about the overall privacy implications of Buzz. That naturally makes me wonder how serious they are about privacy in general and it makes me question the policies and procedures Google has in place to protect privacy.

Bottom line

As part of the Google Buzz announcement the company stated that an enterprise version of Buzz would be available later this year. If Google can't win over consumers and techies to Wave, then it's very unlikely to win over the much more security-conscious enterprise.

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

335 comments
danmcmie
danmcmie

Why are google even interested with the buzz concept. Gmail is a huge success without it and doesnt need it. It kinda goes against googles whole idea of keeping things simple.

atiph303
atiph303

One Rule : Don't try to use whatever comes up on internet for free unless you require so.

thinkfeeldo
thinkfeeldo

The moment I saw Buzz at my gmail account and read the opening blurb on connecting with 'my friends' I went "whooooooa mah man, they've really gone and done it now!" And by 'they' I'm referring to Google's technological capabilities i.e. their computers and not necessarily to the legion of 'human' machines' who work there. Somehow, the humanness of all our technogadgetgobbling society has slowly been sucked out of us and there's soooooo much proof that I could (maybe should) write an entire book on the subject. But just to point out some things: To some extent Google does actually 'know' me but only it's technology, it's machines know me. I don't think any one-person at the whole GooglePlex knows me or is even aware of me or has any idea about the amazing killer apps I'm working on. What 'KNOWS' me is the system! Or, I should say that it's trying to get to know me. For example, you send me a 'gmail' (and no one I know refers to it as that...another subtle attempt by the Big Gee to get you to replace the word email!) with the word lawyer in it and on the right hand side 'legal' adverts are displayed. The problem with Google's system is that it can't determine the R E L E V A N C E of the word 'lawyer' within the context of the material! Your email was actually about a lawyer mate you know who nearly chocked to death on a piece of chicken! Relevance is the real key every damn system on the planet is trying to crack. And believe you me, they'll get there! As for security, the Buzz was more like a fizzle when 'they' suggested I should now let my friends 'know' what I'm up to. I for one certainly hope that the BUZZ is the biGGest flop ever in the history of the Great Gee cause the 'humans' who actually created it and were just uni students when they started, have now built the most invasive/ pervasive system ever known to (hu)mankind! Oh and BTW, it's still only in its infancy! As an AI & Dynamic Networking Systems Architect I know only too well the true capabilities of the kind of system that's about to head our way. And unfortunately it's all a bit too late to crow about it. But what people need to do is be aware about the implications. People need to provide less personal information. It's like joining this site (techrepublic) and, as requested, providing a bucketload of info about yourself, what you do, your position, where you're located, who you had lunch with, what they ate, etc etc etc etc just to post a comment??? Why all the data collection?? Why do people 'give up' sooooooooo much of themselves and their IDENTITY? The systems we use have the capability to remember what we do, where we go, even follow us from site to site, all the while collecting data. Even Firefox asks "Do you want Firefox to remember this password?" every time you create a new one!! What gets me though is the question - Do I want Firefox to......???? Like somehow Firefox is a thing, a living, breathing entity! Names like Google, Firefox, Microsoft etc etc are NOT things, they are NOT entities that we emote with or to. They're really legal structures with real thinking, feeling and doing people making decisions which will impact on our future - and our lives. At the end of the line there is a human who is running the show; who is thinking about the bigger picture, who is instructing others to Design, Construct and Deliver. So, Thomas is right! Be cautious, 'cause the future is coming faster than you could have ever imagined and when it finally arrives and its intelligence is such that 'it' offers you R E L E V A N C E then look out! You'll slowly need to use less of your own mind to consider things and will fall ever so deeper into needing instructions. So next time you go to enter personal information into a website just to post a response, think again and that also goes to the founders, developers and owners who are making the request. One last thing: A Test Go to a local bar or cafe and walk up to a complete stranger and ask them to give you personal details, i.e. where they're from, where they work, what they do etc etc, before they even get a chance to know who you are or what you're about. Wadaya rekon your chances of success are??

n.smutz
n.smutz

I looked at my profile and I saw an option to link google reader but it wasn't linked. There seems to be a twitter-like "follower" system with a number of un-named non-public profiles among the public ones when I look at a "follower"'s profile. Is there still a breach here?

SteveB68
SteveB68

Hmmm, the privacy issue has never worried me - HONESTLY folks, would you ever really put things you don't want other to know on the internet? Come ON! Don't display your naivte... What I think is a bit funny is the poor effort that Buzz produced on hooking me up with the people that matter to me... I have been a gmail user for many years and even though the account that got "Buzzed" was a new personal account the one person I got linked 2 with Buzz was a writer's group friend with whom I have exchanged maybe 5 emails. On the other hand, both of my sons and I exchange multiple emails every week. Neither of them got linked to me in Buzz, so this must have been a very weak "connection engine, beta test" that they were using... Anyway, does this show that Google is bad? No... what I really think it shows is that you should do "beta" testing with a live community the way Google likes to do... or the fallout might not be pleasant!

amshoaib
amshoaib

This May Surprise few People but i was Damn sure from Day One that Google is going to be a nasty mistake by all of us and i used to tell my friends that never use any service from any Tech company completely..i mean if u r using Gmail for mailing purpose then dont use google as search engine and if u r using google as search engine then use its rival microsoft for mailing purpose and use yahoo for chatting and some other company for social networking which is not related to these and use your web browser different and not at all related to any one of the above companies..by this way atleast we can have some privacy left but still i dont think it wil work...Google i told in the initial days itself that will be going to try to dominate our lives more than what microsoft did...its in the nature of people to dominate and crush the rivals..The dictatorship and the fascist nature is there in humanbeings..its not just in politics its there in business and in technology..every where we see people trying to dominate the lives of others and become powerful...My suggestion is just throw these companies out of our lives and use local and small start ups and never continue to one service..always change mail id's,mailing services and even IP addresses and ISP's..

COM3
COM3

So I've heard ixquick mentioned, but what are the alternatives?... and honestly how can you trust any of them?

Shadetree Engineer
Shadetree Engineer

I was one of the slow ones, it took me a day and a half before I decided I wanted Buzz permanently disabled. Of course, it was also a day and a half before I really tried doing anything with it... What's really annoying is when checking my mail, that I have some of my screen area taken up with a notice telling me to 'turn on Buzz'. I would really like it if even that could go away. This is just like that move Facebook pulled, when they reset all my privacy settings to 'public' without asking me. Isn't it just a bit of a temptation, for a business who survives on generating ad revenue? They might think of ways to open our profiles to more advertisers. Because we ARE the harvest

mlewus
mlewus

There is a small company called "privacy harbor.com" that has a secure (encrypted) email product. No, I don't work for them, and I don't even use their product. But I don't use GMAIL either and this latest mess is one reason why. People trust Google because, up to now, they have been at least publicly trustable. "Do no evil" and all that (which the CEO rescinded recently, by the way). But when the founders leave, and eventually, as with every company, the day comes that the stock tumbles, that will all end. And then some new CEO with a zillion depressed stock options will find a way to turn all of that private information into money. And that's the day you will see the full text of your private emails made available on the web - at a price, of course. We as Americans (and I mean no disrespect to our non-US readers) have 200+ years of hard won rights in the area of privacy. These rights control what the government can know and how they can go about learning it. But if you put your info in the public domain then you essentially freely give up those rights. To simply give those rights away to a company that is free to do whatever it wants, whenever it wants, is in my opinion insane. I am not a young man, and I feel a little sorry for those of you who are. By the time you are my age you will have completely forgotten what it was like to have privacy. To be able to think what you want, say what you want, and not have some big brother staring over your shoulder the whole time. Or at the very least using your private thoughts to enable marketers to get into your head. And the most amazing thing about it is that you are allowing it to happen in exchange for something that is worth almost nothing - a free email account. Privacy Harbor's ad on the radio goes something like this: "We are in the secure communications business, not the advertising business. Can you say that about YOUR email provider? Learn the dangers of marketing your information on the internet at ..." I think they have a point.

rampono
rampono

Yes Google is here to stay, but I must say that I was one of those users who wanted to turn Google Buzz off the minute I started to try it. It was annoying and made me seriously wonder about their security protocols given that they've been lauding that since their inception

vigremrajesh
vigremrajesh

then how can we get privacy for our data's and files in gmail account

Mondoto
Mondoto

Google is an AD company, ADvertising, first and foremost! Don't board the ship! The real "evil" thing was when people somehow thought Google was merely a cutie search engine company. It's about getting data about you and then selling ADs. What did you think it was? AND NOW they've been deeply hacked by the Chinese. Who's your personal data daddy now? So pitiful for those who gave up their privacy and anonymity - forever. That database on you will never go away, ever - no matter whose hands it is sold to, or hacked into. http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/why-us-easy-mark-hackers-021610?utm_source=Threatpost+Spotlight+Email&utm_medium=Email+Marketing+-+CRM+List&utm_campaign=Threatpost+Spotlight&CID=

ITSPL
ITSPL

I am Completely Agree With Mr. Hason on his concern over our privacy.I too facing lot's of fraudelent mail's daily that results into my productivity loss due to these mails.They are using gmail accounts for sending fake mails. LIKE: First sending sms to the person that you are selected for further advancement send your updated CV to this e-mail address:wipro/voltas/ibm/dell.recruitment.13@gmail.com As you send the resume within 5 seconds a automated e-mail reply came saying good wishes you are selected amongest 24 as administrator/executive/t-support for our new plant in Pune or Noida or Delhi.pls deposit rs 4250/- in account no:224600xxxxxxx in any EDC bank.its a refundable security.pls deposit the amount and mail to this address directrecruitment@post.com.we will send you your job offer letter & a Air ticket to destination point.good luck for further process. Any Name Sr. HR wipro technology any address A mobile no to contact. CONCERNS: First and foremost they have my mobile no. Second:Companies like wipro,ibm,voltas are big names they are having their own domains,why their HR sending you a mail by google account it must be @wipro. Third:They cleared so many times they have not authorized any agency to recieve job applications on behalf of company. Inspite of this many guys deposit the amount into given account number.i am feeling sad for them. gurbinder Microsoft certified professional. Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist. Microsoft Certified IT Professional. Security Expert.

JimWillette
JimWillette

I wish I could say the same, but a few months ago an association of which I am a member chose to use Google for its Wiki. I read the fine print on the (expansive) linked set of terms of use, etc. I was astounded to find that just about anything we post there could become Google (non-exclusive) property, if I interpreted the terms correctly. It was way too acquisitive for me. Take an afternoon and read through it, and see if I'm wrong.

Jango7777
Jango7777

This is all what we get for using the free services provided by internet companies. How can we blame those companies and their employees? The terms of service, how many percentage of the users really read it, and how many percentage of them really understands it? I will not be surprised to see people still signing up even if the terms of services for some free service reads 'we will cut your fingers if we need to and at your cost'. If what is said in Wikipedia is true (it is just that I don't know any other source to refer this to), the saying "there ain't no such thing as a free lunch", refers to a custom, meaning that things which appear to be free are always paid for in some way. Little off the subject.. First of all, We need technology to some extent, not to help turning ourselves into Robots and Aliens. Go see somebody (say for a birthday as an example) -> send someone on our behalf -> writing letters -> making phone calls -> leaving voice mails -> sending emails -> sending instant messages -> sending mobile text messages -> facebook/orkut/twitter -> Automated communication -> Automated communication in your voice -> a machine to talk on your behalf

chairman
chairman

The big MIGHT-PULL-OUT-OF-CHINA PR offensive DID confirm my worst fears about Google. It was so MANIPULATIVE to the point where I got really offended. They essentially took the last bits of goodwill that they enjoyed from the public at large and squandered it the way those damned politicians are accustomed to doing. They received TONS of support from the world at large for the "so-called" courageous stance that they were taking in the defense of freedom and human rights and when the Chinese government called their bluff and refused to budge, after all that puffery and smoke and mirrors, all we got from the famous Google PR machine was a wisper of an announcement stating that they had finally decided not to pull out of China. No explanation at all was given for that decision. Bottom line, absolute power corrupts absolutely and Google is no exception to the rule.

jkameleon
jkameleon

Why would Google Buzz be an exception?

mustangmadness
mustangmadness

Is there a way to turn off Buzz from within your Google account? Or do you have to use it?

ITgurrl
ITgurrl

The way Buzz was launched was the height of arrogance, and it will eventually get them into trouble. I believe someone has already sued them. Privacy is something that should not be allowed to be taken lightly and any company with that much power/knowledge over and about their customers should have the highest level of privacy regulations and ethics imposed on them. Most lawmakers in office now are old fogies with no conception of the level of intrusion that companies can inflict on their employees/customers/etc. Look at the composition of the supreme court for example, then look at congress. Who can you point to that has any significant knowledge about technology, much less internet privacy? It's too bad that Google has stooped to this level of sloppiness/callousness. I use many of their products, but I may not for much longer.

EarlLee
EarlLee

Ok ....I had read about 40 of these posts...So if complaining is the starting point....what are the alternatives? What is the call to action...I love this site,especially since I can learn from you all...Can we absolutely elimanate Buzz? or Can we block our IP addresses? Let's get proactive...Teach me please if you can.

Jasonjb1222
Jasonjb1222

Google is bad. Why? Because they employ smart people. Smart people work for Google from all walks of Tech life. My personal favorite was one that laid the groundwork for a great exploit. Installing Google Chrome. Oh no! I use chrome, what's wrong with it you might ask? I am happy to tell you. Look it up and dig for yourselves (invitation to all security people out there). Where does Chrome install it's "back door" and "download it's executable content" you might ask, good question. In your %userprofile%. How is this bad? Well you'll be happy to know that the location where your user profile is stored, you have complete and absolute rights over. Hence FULL CONTROL. So by downloading and executing carefully crafted code from this "reserved space" for your user settings, it basically allows (or allowed if it has been fixed) google to run any app it so chooses basically bypassing any and almost all security measures you or the company you work for had put in place to prevent such things from happening. This "exploit" as there really is no other way of defining it; has allowed many a new malware, adware and badware to have an entirely new playground from which to wreak havoc upon you- which before the smart people over at google figured out how to use it for their own benefit was not being used or exploited. Of course, that's a Windows problem, so you MAC and Linux/Unix people should be safe for now or until they figure out a way to read your Shadow Password folders, extract the information and use your system against you... Which I am sure, more of them smart people are working on. Thanks Google. I am so glad you help bring 'bad'ware to all.

JCitizen
JCitizen

who believe in truth and freedom, and we don't buy your load of crap! Someone is treating you like a mushroom; keeping you in the dark and feeding you LOTS of manure! I and my Jewish and Muslim friends who live here in America live in the light of day; we are educated in the truth and see the way. We also know Israel is not completely innocent of all wrong doing, but we hope our new leader realizes this and will act accordingly. None of us is completely innocent, we are ALL sinners!

dcolbert
dcolbert

Am I alone in wondering what the hype about Buzz was all about? I saw on my Android device that other people had been exposed on Google Maps, along with addresses, posting "Buzzes". That kind of bothered me. But I can't find that the single Buzz I posted (From the Gmail web app on a desktop OS) is "geolocated" on the map anywhere near my area. Which makes sense, the PC I posted my buzz from doesn't have GPS. But I still haven't figured out what it is all about or how to see just how exposed I might be. It seems like the product is overhyped, and the concern is, as well.

parnote
parnote

Jason Hiner, It's not very often that I agree with you, but in this instance, I'm 100% in agreement. Google used to live by the motto of "do no harm." Now, it seems to be more of "I'm Google, I've got all your private information, so I don't give a sh*t about you or your rights."

JJS_InfoSec
JJS_InfoSec

I am completely missing the relevence of this to the topic: "Why Google Buzz confirmed our two worst fears about Google" Do you think that wasting my time with incoherent babble will draw me to your cause?

JJS_InfoSec
JJS_InfoSec

The last quote of this article jerked by head around:"If Google can?t win over consumers and techies to Wave, then it?s very unlikely to win over the much more security-conscious enterprise." Why is it that Info Sec professionals think THEY are in charge of corporate networks and communications? Hey, if their CEO or BoD wants Google Buzz they are going to Get IT. Period! C-Level does not concern itself with being security conscious. They will want this for their company because "it works so well for my ability to communicate." What they don't think through is the end of their sentence "...communicate with cousin Bill about this year's Dumblegaff reunion." Mr. Hiner, the word is NOT OUT in a way that is generally accepted: SOCIAL MEDIA DOES NOT MAP TO CORPORATE SECURITY REALITIES. How can this be a mantra? After all, most people treat their compnay workstation Just Like their personal PC at home. In my experience, quite the opposite will be true once Google introduces the enterprise verison of Google BUZZ. HR and MarComm wonks all over the country and the world are Panting for these Social Media vectors. So too are the spear phishers and social engineers. As the first half hour tag line used to say, "The WORST is yet to come!"

chaz15
chaz15

Bees and wasps sting, as do horsefly's and mozzies and they all Buzz! Google is a big company who one supposes employs the brightest people, yet they make a huge mismash of user's privacy. Some people within Google need to answer to the Google top brass!

thisaintmyemail
thisaintmyemail

Sure, we'll just track which websites you visit and what sites you bookmark, and then we'll unblock pop-ups based on those preferences... >_> Gosh, I probably start using Bing instead.

JCitizen
JCitizen

or any other corporation. When companies finally *get it* that it is in their best interests as well as the customer's, to protect privacy and other assets, then we will finally have a successful business model. But for some stupid reason, NONE of them has woke up to this simple convention. The ONLY positive thing about Google lately for me, was their conflict with China; I may actually start to trust them, if they get into such a flap with the PRC that they get kicked out of China: Then, and only then, I might just start trusting them!!

AnsuGisalas
AnsuGisalas

Relevance and understanding go hand in hand. As a translator, I'm in the business of understanding; I read something, I understand it, I understand it's source, it's purpose, it's target, it's means of affecting. Then I translate that understanding into relevantly corresponding meanings in a different language, discourse and social dynamics. Sometimes nothing of the original remains in the new, except for it's intent, it's purpose. Now look at the Google translator. It doesn't understand. It has word lists with weighted values, synonym arrays, grammatical calculus, semantic coordination values too perhaps. But it doesn't even try to understand, it just makes guesses. It can't interpret, so it can't translate. Granted, outputting the translation is harder than understanding. But it isn't trying to do that. Of course, that's not saying that Google doesn't have systems that are trying to do that...

greggwon
greggwon

The things they talk about in the buzz video are the same things they talked about with the wave introduction. Automatic composition of stuff from surrounding media, and integration of multiple sources into a single stream (your inbox). Google, I feel, is losing it's golden nature by trying to do stuff that it just is not great at (yet).

Neon Samurai
Neon Samurai

"Go to a local bar or cafe and walk up to a complete stranger and ask them to give you personal details, i.e. where they're from, where they work, what they do etc etc, before they even get a chance to know who you are or what you're about." Sadly, if you mix in a little "we're doing a survey" or "you could win our raffle" then your probably golden. You could go so far as setting up a meeting group. Those who sign up get to join in the meeting conversations; else, the transcripts are available for reading after each week. Now, all you need to do is fill out this information sheet and you can join in the meetings. I don't think it takes away from your points though.

boxfiddler
boxfiddler

Daggone it though, you need some paragraph breaks in there. Sharp as it is, it's freaking hell to read without them. That, or a whole lot fewer words.

boweb
boweb

..of today. Big companies lay out an foundation, check what way people can be moved, trow out a decoy and cash in on the follow up. This may well be any side project.. In say three years Buzz( or equivalent) may well be an 'normal' thing like many other IT stuff.. They think people are stupid. At some point they now people are.. Private doesn't worry you... What do I know what information may be of importance in the future. Surtenly you will no know this at the age of say 14 years. Young kids have FB accounts they dump anything on there, and more is to come. Movies, pictures, text, all kind of test, and so called games, questions of sorts, profiles.. What would one need tomorrow to manipulate people? What ever there is to know about you( or kids) there is an gimmick that can be build to find it out. ...

Mondoto
Mondoto

Your personal data is out there now and someday it may be owned or accessed by not-so-nice people and it may be kept for centuries to come, and sold and sold again. I too am old. Years ago I watched a segment on TV where a private investigator was given a canceled check record of an anonymous subject. After analyzing the all the data about the checkbook the P.I. was able to describe the anonymous person in detail including an astonishing list of traits and habits, problems, weaknesses, etc. He could even tell that the writer was cheating on his wife - all by the check purchase record. Fast forward to the future when all your personal data from Google, Choicepoint, your bank and credit card records, public records and more are all tied together in massive interconnected databases and your every next action is anticipated and predicted by supercomputers. Your whole personality will be mapped and we can only guess today at the creative ways you will be pressured, manipulated, exploited, blackmailed, blackballed, etc. This is scary stuff that is already being done on a smaller scale but the trend obvious.

researchound1
researchound1

Anyone who hasn't figured this out really hasn't been paying attention and/or never had their FREE email acct hacked into. Spend the few bucks on your own domain name - many people have that now - and use the email through the hosting company, way more secure compared to any FREE service. Nothing has changed, people just need to think twice before they say/write/do anything on the web because you never know where it will end up and how it could be perverted into something else entirely.

santeewelding
santeewelding

Doesn't hack it. Ain't nothing an AK round through the server, and through those that minister to it, can't promptly cure.

JCitizen
JCitizen

for articles written by Chad Perrin or Michael Kassner. You will see many referenses to reducing your profile on the web while still using its tools. However true anonymity is not possible by our best expeditions into the subject. TR = Tech Republic

JCitizen
JCitizen

Google chrome doesn't work on standard accounts in Vista x64; err, at least last I checked! :8}

JohnBeaman
JohnBeaman

Might I suggest that you communicate this to those not here so their obviously twisted and innaccurate assumptions are corrected before they kill us all, including you and your friends?

JCitizen
JCitizen

Do you see happy campers here? Something I learned in the Army was to look around, and check my six. If I saw a lot of grumpy buddies, it was time to wake up and smell the coffee! Humans are not always lemmings, sometimes the stampede is away from the danger!

JohnBeaman
JohnBeaman

MS: "We don't have to comply to internet and browser standards, we ARE the standard." When Netscape followed the rules, they destroyed them. With the government watching over them now, we have browsers emerging that understand the value of those standards. For that I am thankful. Proof is all the IE work-arounds, when I never see any other browser need them. That's why I don't use IE anymore. IE is biggest virus magnet ever written (after outlook).

JCitizen
JCitizen

I'm forced to agree with your, just as my business associates forced me to join FaceBook!! But, no one forced me to put TRUE information on there either, I just put a lot of BS in my profile.

JohnBeaman
JohnBeaman

At least they admitted it and are taking action to correct it. I would love to hear the answers too. :)

admin
admin

China issue sounds more than a film than a real anti-activism problem. Probly China goverment would not be so stupid to put hackers inside educational buildings trying to hack gmail. It has to be something more complicated, maybe even Google marketing...

JCitizen
JCitizen

but you are right, we shouldn't tug on "Superman's Cape". Naaa! I think I'll just poke him! ]:)

dcolbert
dcolbert

I've got my ears back and I'm certainly trying to sniff the wind... The problem is that I see part of the herd running in a panic... and the other half is chewing grass and swatting flies with their tails... What do you do if 3 buddies are relaxed, playing poker and having smokes, and the other 3 are face down in the dirt crawling for cover? :)

Mondoto
Mondoto

Read this article and ponder. http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/why-us-easy-mark-hackers-021610?utm_source=Threatpost+Spotlight+Email&utm_medium=Email+Marketing+-+CRM+List&utm_campaign=Threatpost+Spotlight&CID= Google admits they've been hacked as the first in a series admissions leading up to the big admission - that they've been hacked for so long that their source code may be filled with government spyware. That anyone using a Google app, toolbar, etc. gets a very, very, deep rootkit. And their "private" database on you is now copied to somewhere else, who knows where. Could it happen? Yes! It all started out so innocently.....

inet32
inet32

"It has to be something more complicated, maybe even Google marketing... " True. It's like the recent assassination in Dubai. It's obvious that it was the Israeli Mossad. The problem is that it's TOO obvious - they would have covered their tracks better, so it must be someone else. OR they deliberately didn't cover their tracks for some ulterior motive. WRT Google it's obvious that it was China. The problem is that it's TOO obvious - they would have covered their tracks better, so it must be someone else. OR they deliberately didn't cover their tracks for some ulterior motive.

JCitizen
JCitizen

I was receiving attacks directly from military installations two years ago. Now they finally woke up and embedded their government sponsored crackers inside public and university ISPs. I'm sure they are smart enough to use the bot-nets too. But they were so openly brazen they didn't even seem to care if they were discovered not long ago. This kind of arrogance is very dangerous!!

JCitizen
JCitizen

and maybe leave that game! :)

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