Windows 8

Windows 8 debate: Right direction or wrong direction?

Now that we know a lot more about Windows 8, it's time to discuss the implications. Come join a live online debate at 2:00PM Eastern on Tuesday.

Last week Microsoft lifted the curtain and showed off a lot more about Windows 8 at the Build conference, so it's time to discuss the implications of Windows 8 on the PC ecosystem, software developers, and the tech industry as a whole. On Tuesday at 2:00PM Eastern over at ZDNet, I'm going to be moderating a live debate on Windows 8 between Ed Bott and Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols.

This is part of ZDNet's new series, The Great Debate, and here's how it works. The moderator sets the topic. The two debaters make their opening statements. Then, we get together for a live one-hour discussion where I toss out questions and both of them have a few minutes to answer and respond to each other's comments. At the end of the online chat, both of the debaters make a closing statement. Meanwhile, during the whole process, the audience gets an opportunity to vote for one side of the argument (and one debater) or the other, and can also join the discussion by leaving comments.

The topic this week is "Windows 8: Right direction or wrong direction?" Veteran Microsoft columnist Ed Bott will be arguing that Windows 8 "is aimed squarely in the right direction," while open source writer Steven J. Vaughan Nichols will argue that Windows 8 "is headed toward another Vista-sized fiasco." Both Bott and Vaughan-Nichols have already posted their opening statement. You can read them on the debate page, which is also where you'll tune in at 2:00PM to see the live debate. Again, this will essentially take the form of a live chat.

Here are some of the topics that we'll discuss:

  • What are the most significant changes in Windows 8?
  • What does Windows 8 say about Microsoft's vision of the future?
  • How will Windows 8 change the PC ecosystem?
  • What will Windows 8 mean for developers?
  • What's Microsoft's strategy for PC-mobile convergence?

Oh, and one more thing: On Thursday morning I will name a winner of the debate. So, you can check back on the same page on Thursday to see who the official winner is (it may not be the same as the people's choice).

About

Jason Hiner is Editor in Chief of TechRepublic and Long Form Editor of ZDNet. He writes about the people, products, and ideas changing how we live and work in the 21st century. He's co-author of the upcoming book, Follow the Geeks (bit.ly/ftgeeks).

98 comments
mhickok
mhickok

Corporate users are often limited in computing choices. The vendor that writes the software that runs our business will tell us what OS to use. These vendors are often slow to support new platforms. Many organizations do not upgrade the end-user hardware as often as they should. We are still 99% on XP but have been purchasing licenses for Win 7. We are struggling to keep up with the many IT projects that we already have -- let alone consider upgrading old computers. Is the industry moving to desktop virtualization? Are we moving to low-power ARM-based computers at each desktop? Is Windows 8 just a desperate attempt to grab the Tablet/Net-top/thin-client market before it goes to open-source? Microsoft's RDP is gaining momentum. Will we be using RD Server for everything in the future? If you tell me that the industry has not yet picked a clear direction, then I say, wait...wait...wait.

mpcservice
mpcservice

There are some things proposed in win 8 that I can see a problem with. You have to have a windows live account. Excuse me, that alone would cut me out (don't WANT ms live acount) ? And some of the basic functionality looks to actually need the cloud, although I'm not certain about how and why. But this would be a big no no for me as well. Protected boot seems to be cutting off any dualbooting. Not too big of a problem but MS is again telling me what I can and can't do on my own hardware with that, also a big NO for me.

delf20k
delf20k

They could have an all in one version for powerful machines complete with free working virtual versions of all the older versions of windows plus doss 6 with able to run like it is on the best hardware of the days it was available and with multiple setups and speeds available. With this all the old software will run and everyone can use the windows they like with the bonus that what was once a BSOD is now restarting an application. To compliment this You could have an omnibus version of office with all the versions with an installer that puts one copy of your choice on each virtual system you wish from the compatible list for each system.

The Management consultant
The Management consultant

Computer scientists warn that proposed changes in firmware specifications may make it impossible to run ???unauthorised??? operating systems such as Linux and FreeBSD on PCs. Proposed changes to the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) firmware specifications would mean PCs would only boot from a digitally signed image derived from a keychain rooted in keys built into the PC. Microsoft is pushing to make this mandatory in a move that could not be overridden by users and would effectively exclude alternative operating systems, according to Professor Ross Anderson of Cambridge University and other observers. UEFI is a successor to the BIOS ROM firmware designed to shorten boot times and improve security. The framework, a key part of Windows 8, is designed to work on a variety of CPU architectures. If the draft for UEFI is adopted without modification, then any system that ships with only OEM and Microsoft keys will not boot a generic copy of Linux. A signed version of Linux would work, but this poses problems, as tech blogger Matthew Garrett explains.

Lemuelpn
Lemuelpn

Whatever what others say about it, but for me I am impress, and should not simply be a right direction but a perfect one.

84web
84web

The idea of having a desktop "behave" like a tablet is ludicrous. My next unit will be a Mac. Linux will go in my current desktop. Bye bye MS. You will not be missed

The Management consultant
The Management consultant

The timing is all about stocks.Does it matter? Windows is set to continue to be a minority player in the OS market as the space becomes crowded with very advanced Open Source development, cloud migration of apps and services.So has MS market really come to an end? The Apple model depends on integration of hardware and software.The Google model depends on open source integration with cloud services.So where is MS? Looks as though its trying to mimic Google from a low base having no control over HW manufacturers all of whom are considering the Google proposition on the Desktop. One good thing is that HW manufacturers will be producing good touch screen monitors from next year for PC's and TV viewing which we all benefit from. Forecasts for the coming 18 months are: A new CEO,further MS layoffs,period of unfocused acquisition, consolidation,and the shareholders forcing MS to take on professional business managers moving away from the current failing developer v's salesman culture.

rosshiuk
rosshiuk

Microsoft lost its way, why does Microsoft feel the need to jump on the ipad bandwagon lke all the rest?? Windows 7 was a good upgrade, but it cost a fortune, besides not being interested in touch screen tech, I wouldn't want to payout for yet another os, when 7 does all I need it to... Also, who wants all those greasy finger prints all over the screen... Microsoft stick to what your good at, be a master of the os, and not a jack of all trades

vmeck
vmeck

I've installed and tested it quite a bit and to me it seems like It's windows 7. So what direction are we really talking about? Seems like it's taken no new direction other than the cell phone interface, which I think is a total dissaster!

PepsiMama
PepsiMama

I thought all this hype of Windows 8 was the new Microsoft Phone! :-( Personally, to me, it looks more like the Mac I use at work, barf, and I'd rather leave work at work.

Awahili Guni
Awahili Guni

Before anyone puts the cart before the horse; hear me out first. 1) Business/Commercial-wise - Windows 8 would be profitable as well as flexiable not just for developers and others et al. Nevertheless, it will create an array of problems in the business industrial world (regardless of size); especially for those who are so used to the original Win OS Platforms with the training and time consuming expenses overhead just to adapt to these new Windows 8 is not going to be very popular in my humble opinion; and most likely unpopular with mid-sized to smaller businesses. **NOTE: I am in USA - and many are STILL using Windows XP Professional (!) with some just now reverting over to Windows Vista (WHY? I don't know considering that Windows 7 is same price or cheaper and uses less resources ... ::: scratching head ::: ) yet, tend to shy away from "7" more so than Vista; and there is a reason for it, call it if you must ... "bad media exposure" and the old adage of "if it ain't broke, don't mess with it". 2) John and Jane Q. Public - provision of them a Windows 8 is only going to provide them an array of mass confusions. Now; erase your brains and geeky minds, put your shoes on the other foot, you're looking for new Windows OS and there's nothing available but Windows 8 and it looks to you like some "Giant Sized Smart Phone / Android" (Well, in a way it does...) and you're finding yourself arguing with the salesperson that you want a MICROSOFT WINDOWS COMPUTER AND THAT IS NOT A MICROSOFT WINDOWS COMPUTER! (Like Mr. T from A-Team would say, "I pity the fool!" only I would revise this to say "I pity the salesperson!") No matter how he/she tries to expound, comprehend, and bring down to their level of concept that this IS a Microsoft Windows .... Windows 8. In my humble opinion; those folks will be looking for Windows Vista or 7 or even XP and/or revert back to what they have and/or own .... "black marketing" of the demand for such Microsoft Windows whether or not Microsoft no longer supports these versions, they won't care anymore, as long as they have a computer and can go online; they will be happy. They are not going to grasp nor compensate all these "geeky" stuff of vulernabilities that will put them at risk. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- So where do I put this at in reality in concept in aspect? A 50/50 coin toss, it's fair in one way and unfair in another; one must realize the technology is indeed advancing yet at the same time the population isn't always up there with "us". I do have some issues with Win 8, to the fact that when one looks upon it all in its entirely; superimposed, Microsoft forgot one thing .... those who are in need of accessibilities (e.g. - visually impaired, supporting assistance, et al), is lacking. If you stop to think about this, like Windows 7 Phone, one is able to enlarge or decrease, but this is not a possibility with touch screens - plus the size of the screen availability is of concern; the overhead cost and expenses. Tally up the cost of everything as a whole and it will add up ... trust me on this. Like Yogi Berra's famous quote "It's deja vu all over again"

tony
tony

MS should have a strategy of a win8 tablet in every bag much like the vision of years ago of a windows computer in every home. The tablet should function as a laptop & desktop replacement that can be used on the go and when at work docked. When docked the tablet will still be active but the standard windows interface would also have its own screen & keyboard.

5haggi
5haggi

Apple and Google worked out years ago that people wanted something different from a Smartphone (and a tablet) to a PC. MS are still stuck in this rut where they think they can treat all devices the same (at least in terms of interface), but I believe it's already been proven that you can't.

n.gurr
n.gurr

When Vista bombed. Win 7 came out and it was like they had realised that to succeed they needed to ask people what they wanted and give it to them. They needed to listen to their interface team and ban hype and jumping on bandwagons. Now they might just not listen themselves into the grave. Windows is the fatted calf, if they risk this then there may not be anything to keep their random adventures in other generally not too successful areas in the black. It looks certain that in the future there is going to be a divide between internet access tools such as a phone, tablets and in production environments a pc. These are different devices. Just like you would not take a mini offroading you need a different vehicle for each type of device. Just like clothing where one size-fits all never fits anyone. At least give us a real choice. At the moment there are three choices. 1. Stick with Win 7 and hope that Win 8 fails and MS still is in a place where they are a choice for pcs. 2. move to Mac or Linux, not comfortable choices - this is a choice most Windows users have already rejected. Or 3. try to get what we want from Win 8. My thoughts are not fully formed yet as I have not tried it (I am installing as I type) but it seems as though Ms are trying to make the whole world a nail!

Mooreman
Mooreman

I think that MS is trying to make a light weight OS do the job of what should be two separate OS. There should be a big bloated one for desktops and laptops that does it all and then keep the new lightweight one for future tablets when they are introduced. I want an OS that will sync all of my PC's automatically over the network/Internet. If I get a virus on one, I want it on all of them! Keep old versions of everything in a history archive in case I change my mind on new edit changes and want to dump them. Fill up those hard drives to keep the HDD manufacturers happy. Max out my RAM to its limits! Do your job already for gosh sakes Microsoft, make Intel proud! Bring on the Bloat, bring on the Bloat! You all know we secretly love it! The true confessions of a hardware salesman.

nirosan7
nirosan7

i have tested the developers package and i came to a conclusion that windows 8 is designed for (and only) tablets. the interface is great but it is greatly influenced by the Google chrome OS . this affects the normal pc users and i think ms should provide a different OS to desktop and laptop users. in the case of big companies, unless they go from pc to tablet straight away i don't see the point in anyone upgrading from windows 7 to 8.

T3CHN0M4NC3R
T3CHN0M4NC3R

I think it does not matters to corporations. I don see any Windows 8 features that will benefit any corporate users. Most of us will likely use Windows Classic UI instead of whatever UI MS provide. I think MS is just trying to build up their image and adding more gimmicks into touch screens and all their likes. Or perhaps brainwashing ppl into liking their tile UI concept. All in all I think Windows 8 will just fit into the end user's market where we need not debate whether it's right or wrong so long they don't decide to pull their plugs on Windows 7 which most of us just started, starting or will start using.

jjvolk
jjvolk

Microsoft had Touch / Tablet features in both Vista and Windows 7. The real improvement was in the area of voice recognition and commanding the OS with voice. It was very impressive. Microsoft does not need to make another Zune Phone OS (Windows 8). It needs to be able to separate the desktop from the phone and tablet. If Microsoft thinks that having pinch and zoom and swipe in Windows 8 is innovative ,they are sadly mistaken. It's not innovative, just more copy cat coding that makes me say "So what?" A desktop OS should be heavy duty and able to do Accounting, Gaming, Web Browsing, Movie streaming and other tasks - in other words general purpose. I don't want the Zune phone on my desktop!

Quaint_Data
Quaint_Data

I just want to say thanks first to you guys who have taken the steps to test it and show us your results. What bugs me is these hidden compliance clauses, suddenly everything with MS windows is compulsary. One must upgrade or lose support or find their expensive non functioning software shelved.. Trust in Microsoft is waining since it is a targeted system and seems to market itself only to compete for the latest and greatest bling throwing all caution to the wind. There is just too much fix it as you find it. The world is very educated now and we need to be so prudent and focused. Bling is fun but when the user's rights to alter and program their system to suit their own needs is stiffled the risks of external breaches are increased greatly and the reliance on Patches increases. I hate the windows updates constantly invading and saying this is at risk install this patch. Windows 7 works fine and now that it too is heavly patched why the upgrade so quickly? Don't put all your eggs in one basket is a wise proverb and has been around for decades. Touch Screen desktops? Cloud and Mobile phones all connected to Twitter and facebook one source. Oh dear no. Do we have to remodel our homes now to put our new touch screens on the wall? I can't imagine how sore my arms would be playing a game or composing music. Do we have a choice? What if you just wanted a multimedia system or games systems Why not keep the Desktop gui concept separate from Touch Screen - Ipads -mobile technology. That way we can turn one off separately and use the other in peace and no back ground running stuff. Have you also noticed as we upgrade the Power Supply Unit is bigger more power the HDD is bigger everything is bigger and costs on our enviroment increase. And that's my impression of the latest offering for Windows 8 everything is accessed in one place. . I'm not impressed with All in One systems way to risky.. I-mac is looking better. Not Interested.

delf20k
delf20k

The one thing that has always bunged me about connecting windows to phones is the complex setup to get things working even if the phone has some version of windows. Rather than put tablet controls on the desktop the better way to go would be to make sure your tablet/phone OS is plug and play with your desktop one and 100% smooth and transparent in its interactions. The way things are going you will need a tablet to use like a mouse.

The Management consultant
The Management consultant

This is a timley release design to plug the revenue gap of spending all the silver on ; Nokia causing a stock nose dive trying to get into mobile communications arena.So back to the old cash cow windows?? It seems to be heading towards a desktop system with some features from mobile with the development of cloud services to rival google. The deal on the table is..if this risk does not work within 5 years MS is dead.the markets already are asking for the ill prepared chair man to leave asap! The enterprise market is wide open for Oracle solaris to clear up in enterprise!

irvan.hendrik
irvan.hendrik

I think Windows 8 just another version of Windows 7 ++ (plus the mobile capability to swipe between windows) I just tried it for one day though. Still trying to figure out how to close the window without killing the process. The GUI for the start menu is really fantastic. It just feels wrong in so many level but I like it. Just hopping that it won't become Windows Vista v2.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I wonder if they will stupidly make another version of DirectX, but this time make it not compatible with Windows 7.

monyogo
monyogo

I wonder if microsoft really reveiwed the economic sense behind dispalying windows 8 so soon. windows 7 is alredy a very powerful and i believe just as stable as XP. Lots of firms are jsut starting to roll in windows 7. Microsoft owns over 70% of all OS. and Upgrading in companies is not always cheep. microsoft need to give people a chance to experience the technology embeded in windows 7 yet. If they needed to compete with Apple or other firms on tablet PC they could produce an OS specific to Microsoft tablets and call it any other name than windows 8. Your windows system is the most stale microsft product and the software ever made in the IT age. Playing with it in the way you do now to beat compitition or customer expectation is both risky for microsoft and the IT world as a whole. Lastly even with all the technoly embeded in the new windows 8, it is not an exciting product and its a rushed up issue just like vista. I believe a lot of customer will stick to windows 7 anyway. Microsft...go back to the drawing board and take your time.

gradkiss
gradkiss

No ... for I presently fear that if I even suggested that windows needs to innovate a bit more than the regular dot to dot code, I would not be able to suggest they innovate their Dev's talents into a convex shaped monitor screen that allows the viewer to see depth. Dimension by slowing and speeding up the pixels on the screen. Trig, Geometry, and other methods are already simplified, but due to their persistence that individuals against patents tac stupid on their foreheads and not share the enjoyment with us here on a daily basis is why I feel they would just steal the idea; pass it off to Apple or some new Inc'ed company and run! have a good day ...

wizard57m-cnet
wizard57m-cnet

Oh look! It's ZDNet's version of "Celebrity Deathmatch"! All this bruhaha over a "preview" release of a work in progress too! I think it would be better to wait for "debate" until a beta version has been released, not arguing the merits or shortcomings of an alpha release.

fvazquez
fvazquez

My network is windows based, it has 30 Pcs, 29 with Xp and just one with Win7, most of them are used to solve office problems that uses Excel or Word, only the Win7 Pc it's used for graphics and image treatment. The question is: do I need Win8? Yeah I'd like to get a copy and see how it works, cause being the IT guy sooner or later it will come to me... But right now I need to get to know Win7 better..

VirtualPro
VirtualPro

There are major major costs for companies to roll out new versions on an OS. The cost of the new OS software license; compatibility testing with applications; upgrades to associated support software (e.g. virus scan); the work to get it deployed and the users learning curve. There has to be corresponding benefit - not just Microsoft trying to maintain a revenue stream by coming out with a new release. It needs additional functionality that enhances productivity and stability while minimizing the upgrade costs. Current software should be backwards compatible with other software; provide for automated upgrade and provide the same user interface to keep down training costs. Beneficial functionality would include: easier remote support, diagnostics for trouble shooting, patching, upgrades, software license management, monitoring and maintaining the original OS integrity (desired state) and performance of the OS (spyware, malware, add-ons, etc.). Tighter code that does not need patching every month!!

zig2na
zig2na

At a glance the only idea that comes to mind is the user friendliness of the OS but I think that is far fetched. It looks more like a desktop version of their windows phone 7 OS(windows mobile 7) and in my opinion, if they are targeting PC's then should stick to the traditional desktop frame but with enhanced graphical presentation of components.

serioza
serioza

Looks like they just thoroughly hid all the options common users never needed, and that left more space to IT professionals to do their job. But is it more usefull? More reliable?? I doubt it !!! Anyway, new year new(???) OS.

Breezeserve
Breezeserve

I think the wrong direction, why? Well alot of companies are still using Windows XP simply because their applications are supported and not supported in the new wave of Windows technology, what's the point, even Windows 7 has a windows xp mode virtual machine, then what's the point if you could just run Windows xp up front, sure some of the features have advanced since xp, but wouldn't it be great to have the look and feel of xp and the advanced features of the newer windows, yep! it would. Windows xp is the best OS the company has released, when you look at it's lifecycle each OS has around 4 years lifecycle, xp has survived over 2 generations 2002, 2006 - Vista, 2010 - Windows 7 (2009), and extended support ends in 2014, so why not build on this, rather than breaking what people are used to, Windows is loosing it's direction. I can see companies using xp even after it's extended support ends.

ralphdb
ralphdb

I can see that it will be Great for Phones,Tablets,Laptops and Desktops..I have been running the Demo and it is very fast !!! I downloaded Chrome and I am impressed with the speed and quality of the HD looks of all Video Clips and the Crisp look of the Text.. I seem to gravitate to the newest Technology and found out guickly that I can still run Games from my old XP Days.. They are also running on this version of Win 8 Developers Demo. I have a couple Bugs because I don't know what I did wrong and can't access my Icons on the Desktop on my main setup but using anther User I can. Isn't this the part that keeps you from being Bored.. So I say Bring it ON !!!

ttruax15
ttruax15

I still use widows and like it; particularly windows 7. The problem with Windows trying to catch up in the crazed world of "tableture" style OS is just that - looking like they are desperate, late to the party and trying to catch up. I have tried Win 8 and found it ho-hum at best and clunky at worst. Windows should stick to it's bread and butter: being everyone's go to OS in the business world and home PC market. Keep win 8 on their windows phone and windows touchpads. In trying to be cool, they just look the fool.

Bresin
Bresin

With the CLI regaining it's place in Windows 7 it's obvious that Bill is leaving a whole lot of the decision making up to development. With that said, is it any wonder that they are controlling their own destiny? They get to defeat their obsolescence by giving themselves job security through the constant creation of OS'es. Now let's talk about the IE team and determine whether or not they're any different.

BaconSmoothie4-2
BaconSmoothie4-2

Do they think anyone would even buy a PC locked down like that. It would be crazy, not to mention I can see another Anti-trust suit, not in the US, of course our elected machine is too well paid-off to stoop to anti-trust issues. I suppose it would keep me from buying a new PC and loading my perfectly legal copy of XP on it...I can hardly wait to sue!

phil
phil

So far it looks as if this will be a version of Windows 7 phone for the PC market. I'm not convinced: very nice GUI but the back end improvements are not there. How about a SQL database for the underlying file system or removal of the registry....Their phones look pretty but lack features once you look beyond the GUI and this looks like more of the same.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Those are appx. 1000 desktops and laptops between two sites. I don't expect we'll consider deploying W8 outside the IT department before late '13 or early '14; later if it requires major hardware upgrades from our W7 equipment.

cpcca
cpcca

In a few years after Microsoft is chopped up and sold off like HP and IBM we will all look back and say "remember when MS tried that radical Windows 8 UI to try and leapfrog Apple and Google into the cloud? Yes that was the beginning of the end."

Fletchguy
Fletchguy

As bad as it is and since its not windows like in anything but name most will skip this and hate it all together. I hate it already and only had it a week or so. The metro part makes it bad and it just doesnt make using it on a pc or laptop practical or effcient.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

W8 probably won't be out until 3Q or 4Q 2012, in time for Christmas shipments. That will be over three years since W7 was released. Some say MS waited too long between XP and Vista; others say W7 came too quickly after V. Regardless of their development schedules, some are going to stake out each side of the question. MS can't win this one, and neither can most other software development outfits.

Fletchguy
Fletchguy

There is enough there in just showing the basic layout to let you know how bad it is. I loved windows since 3.0 but this new version is anti windows and not for windows users. Its very mac os crossed with preschool. The metro ui kills it and for desktops and laptops the entire look and layout blows. The functionality and inards can be argued later but just the look and feel make it sooo badd

BaconSmoothie4-2
BaconSmoothie4-2

Why are you even bothering with Win7 When Win8 is just around the corner. You should be beat testing it already. You are behind the curve, you lose! Why did you even waste your time on Win 7? its not even stable yet! Oh, oops, That was supposed to be Win8 and Win9 I was talking about.

Fletchguy
Fletchguy

I have it and have been trying it out and I have to say as i have been saying its horrible. If your a windows user you will be completely lost as it ditches everything windows and is revolved around the metro tablet part. As stated they give a sort of classic desktop option but no starrt button options. You click start and then have to deal with looking through tiles in the metro crap. Its very child like in appearence and non windows. Its kind of like they said screw our long time customer base and lets go for people who never used windows.

BaconSmoothie4-2
BaconSmoothie4-2

And don't forget, they were still selling NEW PCs (netbooks) with XP on them up til 2010! (because Vista bloatware choked on them). MS ALSO extended the life cycle for XP realizing that there was money to be made. But unfortunately, not enough money to be made, cause they are too greedy (not that apple is any kinder or gentler, they just hide it better). Sometimes I wish I wasn't afraid of Linux.

Fletchguy
Fletchguy

I ahve it too but have found it is just really bad for pcs and laptops. It just doesnt do what it used to do in previous versions and its almost been dumbed down to the point of uselessness. They do give a very weak classic look but the start button options are lost and you have to deal with the annoying metro UI. The metro part is killing it for me I hated the panels on the WP& and definately would not want a tablet wit that UI. f they dump the metro UI and give it a real windows desktop which is mandatory for windows or its doa and they give a full start button back we can talk. On the tablet side or phone it needs more of an android feel as thats the best setup out there but with ability to run full windows software. the metro part has to go thats the killer on the os right now.

wdewey@cityofsalem.net
wdewey@cityofsalem.net

I think that Microsoft needs to pay attention to the market or they will go out of business. People are willing to vote (pay) for a different experience. The problem I see with Win 8 is it's inconsistent. Some portions of the GUI are designed for touch and some aren't. Bill

n.gurr
n.gurr

persumably means Gates, who no longer works for Microsoft but for the Gates foundation, where he philanthropically gives his money away. Perhaps you should aim to hate Steve Balmer?

The Management consultant
The Management consultant

If this is true and opensource is now 16% of our systems windows 7 has a very low market penetration?

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I haven't seen it and it's too soon to tell. I do get the impression that there is so much new about the interface that I'd rather skip a version and let MS beat the bugs out. If we do that, then those who buy new systems at home can learn Metro on their time instead of the company's.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

I hadn't even thought about virtual desktops. I start three in VirtuaWin by default. I like Dexpot too; VirtuaWin just has a slightly smaller footprint.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Sure, having the up one level button would be nice, but that is not worth the price tag. And the tile interface is useless on a desktop, people don't spend their time switching between one application and another. The majority of users have 2 or 3 programs running all the time that they use to do their work and that's it. And I can't see the purpose at home, is that tile thing going to show my 100's of installed applications? Probably not, meaning I will still be digging through menus. Its not going to help me at work either, I got 3 out of 4 dexpot desktops taskbars full with 4 layers each of running programs, documents, folders, etc. I don't see how metro will assist this.

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