iPhone

Eight ways Google's Droid fails to impress

TechRepublic member dcolbert, who was at first blown away by the Verizon Droid, has discovered several areas where the smartphone is lacking. He lists eight of his frustrations and encourages his TR peers to share their feedback about the Droid.

It’s been several months since Verizon released an Android smartphone, and I was an early adopter of the device. At first, I was blown away by the Droid, but as time has passed, I’ve become somewhat disillusioned. Sure, it still does a lot of great things, such as offer Skype, Pandora, and an open market for deliverables. However, there are quite a few areas where the Droid fails to impress.

1. Browsing:

I've found browsing on the Droid to be far less practical than I thought it would be. Now, to be fair, the Droid is miles ahead of IE for WinMo. I use mobile browsing far more often than I ever did in the past, but it’s still a limited, frustrating experience. Quite often, I "bookmark" pages so that I can view them later from a full desktop OS browser.

2. Touch screen

I've read evidence that the Droid's capacitive touch screen – the pinch-to-zoom feature on the Dolphin browser – is not as precise, fluid, responsive, or sensitive as the iPhone LCD. In fact, it appears that the touch screen is more accurate on the iPhone than the Nexus-1, so I think it’s unlikely that this is a processing speed issue. Right now, I'm hoping that the forthcoming 2.1 OS pinch-to-zoom in native apps will work better, but the odds are that Apple has a higher quality touch-screen LCD.

3. Facebook app

The Facebook app for the Droid really disappoints me. In fact, I found the Facebook app for WinMo 6.5 more useful – in particular, the ability to quickly and easily upload photos ad videos. I can do this on the Droid, but it’s a hassle. My friends who have iPhones and are heavy Facebook users, like myself, assure me that the iPhone app is superior.

The big issue with the Android OS is related to how notifications interact with the Facebook app. In reality, they don't. When you get a notification, instead of opening up Facebook, it links to the stock browser, which defaults to either mobile.facebook.com or touch.facebook.com. Responding to comments is so difficult that it’s basically not even worth it. This isn't the dream of being empowered to stay connected while mobile that the Droid promised me.

4. Other apps

The Droid is similar to the Nintendo Wii. The bundled apps blow your hair back, but it’s mostly downhill from there. Maybe I'm just getting too old to understand how to leverage this newfangled, location aware, geo-networking paradigm of mobile computing, although I think I actually get that part of it. The problem could be that I'm generally the old guy at that particular party – not out of the loop, but generationally, I have nothing in common with the people who are in the loop.

It isn't just that, though. While apps like Foursquare get a lot of buzz and seem to have the most revolutionary potential, the problem seems to be a lack of compelling, more traditional apps. This is where the App Count Gap between the Droid and the iPhone is apparent. If the iPhone had ten bajillion-million apps and Droid only had 10,000 – but the right 10,000 apps – it wouldn't matter. But instead, Android mostly has the wrong apps.

5. e-readers

There are e-readers available for the Droid, but Kindle isn't one of them. Coincidentally, Kindle is the e-reader to have. Google should be courting, prodding, and nurturing this kind of relationship, but they’re not. It’s possible that the hardware and architecture design of the Android platform and hardware is simply limited in what it can deliver. I'm not sure Google's product was fully realized when it came to market, and this may ultimately hurt them in the mobile platform battle with Microsoft and Apple.

6. Hardware

From a hardware perspective, the Droid is prone to locking up and having apps crash. It seems that whatever feature I want to use at that particular moment is on the blink. The ironic thing is that it’s often the only part that isn't working right. For example, sometimes I can't open a folder on the desktop that contains an app I want to load, but if I go to the full list of apps, that works fine. GPS also goes on the blink frequently, and for some reason, it wants to relocate me in Tennessee.

The Droid feels, and I've said this before, "Linux-like" – in the sense that behind a pretty, polished exterior, the nuts and bolts seem a little shaky, unpolished, and unrefined. The Android desktop GUI reminds me a lot of Ubuntu with the Compiz Cube. And the apps remind me of the apps you can download from Ubuntu Repo. They've got a DIY, "did this in my basement during the evenings and weekends, not during my day-job" vibe to them.

7. Keyboard

I've become adept at the Droid’s virtual keyboard, and I'm confident it works very similar to the iPhone's, including an annoying tendency to autocorrect and totally blow my tweets. For example, I recently tweeted, "Hated Kate and Jack both for at least two seasons, Hope Sawyer has learned his lesson." Autocorrect thought "Hated Late and Jackson for at least two seasons" was really what I was trying to get across.

8. Battery

The battery life on the Droid is also poor. In the morning, if I run an app and forget to exit or set it to sleep, the phone is literally baking in my belt holster and down to 20% battery life before 11:00 AM. Even with very little use -- maybe making three calls and running a couple apps for 15 minutes or so at a time, two or three times during the day – I'm crawling into my dock by 9:00 PM with hardly any juice to spare. While this isn't a deal breaker, it’s certainly something that could use significant improvement.

Mostly, I find that now that the magic has worn off, I don't use the Droid nearly as often, or in as revolutionary a manner as I had hoped I would. The whole concept of a "Droid" – I wish it delivered better. I want an RD2D or C3P0. Need to store the blueprints of a space station? Droid does that. Need to interface with the Millennium Falcom's ODB-II Computer? Droid does that, too. The fact is, despite the marketing hype, there are some things that Droid doesn't, and they're pretty big things.

If you've got a Droid, I'd be interested in hearing your feedback. Do you agree with me or think I’m totally off base on these observations?

About

Donovan Colbert has over 16 years of experience in the IT Industry. He's worked in help-desk, enterprise software support, systems administration and engineering, IT management, and is a regular contributor for TechRepublic. Currently, his profession...

27 comments
Lazer_x
Lazer_x

If by chance you are not going to use that droid???? Would you please, maby, send her to me. I promise to love her and keep her safe for ever. All electronic devices have problems, therefore my only problem in using them is to find a way to work around the problems. Please don't be angry with me as I am quite serious with this offer. If you take me up on the offer, I will be more than happy to pay the postage. I can't upgrade for a year and a half, and I really don't want to live in the dog house that long :-) Thanks Your greatest fan.....

dcolbert
dcolbert

It is my company phone. :) Again, don't get me wrong... I really DIG my Droid in a lot of ways... These are 8 valid criticisms about the Droid and/or the Android platform as a larger whole. The Droid/Amiga analogy that I've used, let me also say this: The problem with my Amiga experience was that platforms like the Amiga and Atari ST end up developing their own unique, "generic" apps. On the Atari ST a game called "MidiMaze" comes to mind, and for the Amiga, there was "Great Giana Sisters" (A Super Mario Bros. knockoff) and a Shareware/PD game called Battlemech/Mechforce (there is a modern PC version of this game, as it gained a pretty big cult following). The Android already has a game called "The Great Land Grab". It isn't a game that I would have gotten into on an iPhone because, honestly, there would have been more compelling "major label" games to occupy my time. A game like "The Great Land Grab", might *only* be able to become a "success" on a platform like the Droid - in much the same manner that the above titles became cult successed on their platforms. There was no Wing Commander, Wolfenstein 3D, or Duke Nuke 'Em for Amiga and Atari. So titles like MidiMaze and Ports of Call, quirky titles that would NEVER be mainstream success on more commercially successful platforms, had a chance to catch on. And when you move on to a mainstream platform, you miss those quirky, odd titles that just get drowned out in the slick commercialism of more mainstream platforms. I can see that happening to me when either iPhone or WinMo 7 become too compelling to ignore - that moving from Android will be bittersweet because there will be quirkly little titles that I have to leave behind. But if Android can't deliver the titles, I think it is eventually inevitable.

Lazer_x
Lazer_x

You may not believe this, but I have a Amiga 1200A on the floor under the radio table. My son's Amiga 500 is upstairs under the bead in the spare room. I have a ton of games for them. I can't believe it. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA Enjoy your Droid sir, I will keep myself busy with my BB Tour till I can upgrade. By then who knows what the Droid will be able to do????? Thanks for the reply :-)

dcolbert
dcolbert

Getting rid of it was a tough decision. I had a loaded Amiga 2000 with 40MB of internal hard drive and 4MB of ram... :) But the i386 and Wing Commander were irresistable. :)

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

This phone pwns all. It eats iPhones for breakfast and poops Moto Droids. I also hear the HTC Incredible is pretty nice too.... *for Verizon. I refuse to use AT&T. I have them for work and they are AWFUL on every level.

kollinblog
kollinblog

To me this is very strange .. It's almost like we have different phones. I have an iPhone 3GS also. I will respond point by point .. 1. i find browsing the two equally usable. Certainly no less usable than iphone, if not more given the greater rez of the droid screen. 2. I don't get the precision thing. I click a link, and it clicks. What more precision is needed? Also you have pinch zoom now in Dolphin and Browser (with 2.1 update). 3. Agreed the fb app isn't as good. It's not an Android OS issue, though, it is primarily because of an agreement apple has with fb that allows iphone version to leverage internal API calls. However, a 3rd part app called bloo keeps all notifications within the app, as well as allowing easy video, image and link posting. 4. I haven't yet been able to not find an app that didn't meet my needs and empower me. You don't list what kinds of apps you don't have on droid you wish you had. 5. e-readers. i cant comment on this, as I don't use. But I see this coming asap given the burgeoning popularity of android devices. Not to mention the higher res screen would prolly be nicer to read on. 6. Hardware. Again, different device? I barely ever have any issues. I'm impressed with it's flawless stability. 7. Yes they both can do funny autocorrects if you're not paying attention happy. 8. Battery. This is a really weird one to me. One thing I've been blown away is how good the battery life is. I dimmed my screen to the lowest setting, which is still bright. And I find, even with constant use, 3 push email accounts, web browsing, google talk, twidroid and fb use, I easily get about 18 hours before I need to plug in. So I'm not sure why the disparities, but my experiences are way different.

dcolbert
dcolbert

1 - I think it is just a matter of this form factor - I don't think that the Droid is probably worse, or better, than the iPhone for browsing. I think the device format (size) limits how practical browsing is on mobile devices. I'll never browse Tech Republic and enter a response on my Droid, an iPhone, or even an iPad (that isn't hooked up to a physical keyboard). For non-interactive, passive READING, these devices are generally fine. But I like my Web to be an interactive experience. Droid may, with voice recognition, be on track to doing something toward resolving that. 2: I've read informal technical side-by-side tests where the Android devices did poorly drawing a grid of intersecting lines compared to the results on an iPhone, and I believe it. Another interesting result, though - Today I was surfing on a friend's 64GB iPad and hit a page with a LOT of noise on it. Big article, lots of ads and links to other articles, and a huge, sprawling comment section. On the iPad, scrolling the page from top to bottom as fast as possible, it could not render fast enough. It would SCROLL, but the screen would just be grey. I then sent the link to my Droid, and it rendered fine - but would occasionally miss an input. This is a design philosophy. The iPad "smoothness" is an illusion. Priority is given to input, even if the processor cannot render the page fast enough - and the result is that it *feels* smoother. On the Droid, if the input exceeds the ability of the processor to render, the input is disregarded. I found the Droid approach less disruptive to me on this particular page. But the popular public perception seems to favor the Apple approach - which I think is an illusion. 3 - I don't care *why* it isn't as good. Neither do other consumers. They just care about what is *best*. Android/Google needs to figure out how to better compete on issues like these. Facebook is *important* in a mobile device. It needs to integrate far better than the Android/Droid versions do. Hate to be harsh about this, but it is the truth. 4: SuperMonkey Ball. :) And other major label, very well done titles. Kindle. The iPad had the Kindle app on day 1 - Android still doesn't have the Kindle app. Remember when you were a kid and you would go clothes shopping and you wanted a name brand and your mom tried to convicne you that the J.C. Penny "Braggin' Dragon" was *just* as good as Polo? Linux apps, and Android Apps, are like that. This is *huge* - and despite giant sales of the Droid, major developers still *love* Apple and shun Droid. That is *no good* for the long term health of Android. If that doesn't change, that is "the writing on the wall". 5 - Kindle. Available on Day 1 on the iPad, a device that basically states that it wants to trash Amazon's Kindle hardware model. Not available at *all* on Droid. When is it coming? Because it is already on the competition. 6 - I'm not alone. I've heard a lot of feedback about device instability, app instability. "The application is not responding, force close?" issues. issues that require rebooting. This is built on LINUX?!? :) 7 - Yes, I've heard that Apple is not immune to annoying autocorrect. What I find funny is that these devices autocorrecting is FAR more invasive than Microsoft Bob (the paperclip) jumping into Word to tell you "It looks like you're trying to write a letter...", yet, people hardly complain. 8 - Just had a friend with a Droid come into my office and say, "since the 2.1 update, and live wallpaper, I end every night in the orange". I suppose it depends on your settings. I keep Bluetooth and WiFi turned off, GPS on almost always, Refresh kept on (and set to 30 minute cycles) - and I've had brightness set to LOW, but I recently changed it to "auto". Even before 2.1 and live wallpaper, I was in the orange almost every night by bed time. I agree, it is almost like we have two different Droids. But, don't get me wrong - I love the Droid for what it is and what it does, and I think I'd be just as unhappy with the limitations of an iPhone. I do have grave concerns about the Droid, though - and I think if Google doesn't resolve some of these *major* issues with the Android platform as a whole, they're going to flounder and Microsoft and Apple will end up dividing up the pie between themselves.

eglowell
eglowell

I came from a Blackberry, and find that although the Droid is marginally less stable, the wealth of apps (again, compared to the BB, I've never had an iPhone) makes the occasional force closed unsurprising (I have to reboot my Windows PC at least that often). I've also never had an issue with battery life, with a dozen or so phone calls each day, innumerable emails, the occasional GPS usage, and brightness set to the default level. When I plug it in at night it is rarely below 50%. For now, I've been able to avoid Facebook. Call it a generational issue (my son and wife both love it). I use a 3rd party notepad app for my task list, and find the hardware keyboard acceptable for the 3-6 words I'll enter into each note. I'm also taking MBA courses at night, and next semester will get a BT full-sized keyboard which will let me leave the 6-pound laptop at home. The only real beefs I have are: 1. I can't tether with it. BB had this nailed. 2. No simple BT-enable voice dialer. BB also had this one nailed. If they could solve those two I'd be thrilled.

dcolbert
dcolbert

pdanet by Junefabrics is what you want for Android/Droid tethering. It isn't a perfect solution (you have to put your phone into development mode to run it... but at least you don't need to root it) and it isn't FREE, but it'll do the trick you're looking for. Dunno what to do about #2. Yes... Android is far ahead of Blackberry for apps, ahead of WinMo 6.5 for everything... In a world without the iPhone, Android would *rock*. But this is a world WITH the iPhone... I was literally at an urgent care one night, sitting in the lobby, and had pulled out my Droid and was occupying some time with it. A kid came in with his mom, and pulled out his iPod Touch or iPhone and... it sounded like he had a game console in his hands. It made my Droid seem... lame. Heh. It was actually embarassing. And it isn't just games. It is apps. Kindle. Why isn't there a Kindle app for the Droid, when the iPad had Kindle on day 1 and the iPad has vowed to take over the Kindle hardware market and upset Amazon dominance of eBooks? Seriously. If that isn't a "What The Heck Are They Thinking" moment, I don't know what is. Why does the Facebook app suck? How come I can upload Droid videos to YouTube, but I can't e-mail them or send then to Facebook? What possible reason is there, if these videos can be sent to YouTube, *and* they don't violate the video limitations of Facebook? Did I say this somewhere else? Did I use the "getting generic knock off clothes as a kid" analogy? Not having major name apps on Linux is one of the great consumer liabilities of the Linux platform - I don't care how good OpenOffice gets, or GIMP... they're *not* Office or Photoshop. Your Wrangler Jeans may be fine for you... but most people want Levi jeans. Your Zips may last twice as long and cost a 4th of the price of my Nikes or Converse... but they're still *Zips*, and you look like a dork in them. Android has this problem. Sure, Foursquare and Pandora and a lot of the mainstream apps exist for Android... but Guitar Hero 4 just released *yesterday*... which is like, I dunno... WAY TOO LATE at the very least. Android app development is lagging and is plagued by false starts. I heard about Assasin's Creed for Android months ago... and it is vaporware. I see this a lot - especially for major label game titles. I also see the titles release, and they bite, then they get pulled - which makes me think the Android platform just can't deliver the goods for COMPLEX apps, gaming in particular. If the iPhone didn't exist, Android phones, the Droid in particular, would be the best phones available. But that is the blue-pill reality. The red-pill is that the iPhone exists.

camwing
camwing

I agree completely with your first (glowing) review of the Droid. The seamless integration of my digital life is the #1 feature and the iPhone simply can't compare. I only partially agree with you on this review. I'm a young IT professional, so I guess I'm in the loop, but I had a blackberry for a year before I got my Droid and most of your concerns can apply to Blackberries (and iPhones) too. Browsing on a mobile phone will always be a compromise due to the size of the screen and how easy that makes absorbing the information, however you never actually say why you dont like browsing on it, just that its "less practical". The touch screen is great, and with 2.1 pinch to zoom works very well. While the screen lacks the precision of the iphone, it's still 95% there, and looks much much better. I'm a heavy facebook user and I have had no problem taking a picture/video and sharing it to facebook on the spot. Just select the picture from the gallery, click share and click facebook and voila! Worst part is the time it takes to upload and even that's not bad. While I think notifications should route you to the app instead of the web (the app still shows them if you go into it), it's just as easy to tap the text box, type and tap Post as it would be in the app (again you don't say why its so difficult to comment that its not even worth it, which sounds like hyperbole to me). I simply don't see your issue with it. There is certainly a lack of highly polished, professional apps. However, the majority of these that the droid lacks are odd, niche apps or high-profile branded apps. This will change as the wave of android phones starts to flood the market and market share alone will force development companies to notice. The hardware works near-flawlessly for me, and I have only had apps crash a handful of times, usually when I install a non-market app or one that is on version 0.1. I have had no problem with GPS, and the only time its ever an issue is with Gowalla when it detects me at the cellphone tower because I'm indoors and wont let me check in to a venue. I like the virtual keyboard too, and with 2.1 the voice capture button is a godsend. Yes both the auto-correct and the voice capture will mess up on occasion, but the auto-correct WILL learn your frequently used words, so it becomes less of an issue, despite the hilarity that usually ensues (when it turns Mmm into Mommy, it can be a bit creepy to the recipient). I'd much rather have auto-correct and delete a word here or there than not have it, just pay attention to anything you type, just like when using a regular keyboard. My battery will be dead if I am constantly surfing all day (which I have done plenty of time while fawning over its gadget glory) but if you use a task manager that autokills your known battery hogs then your fine. Sure, you shouldn't have to get a task manager, but that's the price you pay for multitasking. I dont know what kind of apps you're running that suck that much juice. Of course the magic wears off, because it's not magical to begin with. It's not a VCR, its a computer. All of your arguments seem to boil down to the fact that it's not quite as polished (that 5-10%) as the iphone, which is true in some regards, but the iphone has plenty of shortcomings of its own. Every iphone owner I know can spout off a list just as long about whats wrong with their magic internet phone.

dcolbert
dcolbert

I went on a trip to MD. this weekend, and did 95% of my communications on my Droid... it made it almost impractical to bust out my Netbook for the more "in-depth" computing I had to do. (Which leads me back to wondering why the iPad is flying off the shelf like it is... but that is another post). So, maybe you're on to something. More later.

jerrycline
jerrycline

This is my first smart phone. Some of my issues may be due to my inexperience and/or the lack of knowledge at my Verizon store (duh). I certainly agree that web browsing is just for emergencies. I am also tired of having to reselect and re-load my apps after the phone has to be re-set (almost monthly). I do like the camera. I see the inability to dial without touching the phone as a major fatal flaw. New technology should be safer to use not more dangerous. My sense is the hands dialing needs to be the highest priority.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

You mean that if a Droid crashes, (and it appears to do so frequently) you have to completely reselect, reload, and reconfigure your apps? What's up with that? In all the years of using Palm Treos, I've only had to do a "hard" reset once, and when that happened all I have to do is sync with my PC and everything (apps and data) are reloaded just as they were before. A device that crashes monthly and requires me to practically start from scratch is a non-starter for me. It might serve as a toy, but not as a mature technology meant for serious work.

ruffinius
ruffinius

Droid has broken the iPhone 74 day sales record and your comparing a first generation phone to a second generation phone.

dcolbert
dcolbert

Just because there is huge demand for a VZW alternative to the iPhone doesn't mean that the Android is a *better* phone. I've got a LOT more to say about the comments that have come in on this, and a lot of it will be *defense* of the Droid, but - I'm not giving them a free pass. Motorola, Verizon and Google have made *huge* mistakes where they had an opportunity to just *destroy* the Apple war-machine. If they don't do something soon, it *will* be too late. But that 74 day sale record only means that there were 1 million *anxious* Verizon customers who wanted *something* better than a Storm 2... It doesn't mean that the Droid is actually competitive with the iPhone. And *that* is what is all wrong with the entire domestic US cellular market.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

I too am "not out of the loop, but generationally, I have nothing in common with the people who are in the loop". I'm currently using a Palm Treo 755p; something most here would consider a positively Jurassic platform. And yet it does 90% of what I need out of a mobile device with relative reliability and speed. I've been on the Palm platform since the '90s. Getting all of data over to a new platform and apps replaced would be a significant investment of time and money, so I resist it. Perhaps part of the reason that so many younger people so enthusiastically jump on these new platforms is because they have so little invested in the previous one. Other than making sure that my clients can communicate with me as they need, I am hardly as "networked" as those who are generation or two younger are. I marvel at many of these new apps, but really can't find any real use for most of them in my everyday life. And then I read about the nuisances you and others still live with on these newer devices; frequent crashes and batteries that are consumed before lunch and I find it even more difficult to get excited about converting.

Jeff7181
Jeff7181

I had a Droid. The instability was a deal breaker. I had my first phone replaced and the second one wasn't any better so I returned it within the first 30 days. Ironically, its role as a telephone was the least reliable and most frustrating. I consistently could not talk on the phone for more than 30 minutes or the phone would lock up. I could finish the call, but couldn't end it... the call would only end because the other person disconnected. It made the vibrations and noises when I opened the keyboard and tilted the phone like it was somewhat responsive, but the display would not turn on or respond to touch and ultimately I would have to pull the battery. I was also put off by the crappy battery life. If I was actively using it as much as I do my Curve, I'd get 4-6 hours of battery life. If docks for it were as cheap as they are for my Curve ($15) it wouldn't be so bad because I could charge it at my desk when ever I'm not actively using it and quickly pick it up and go when I'm not using it. Which brings up the next shortcoming... I never did see a decent holster for it. I get that it uses magnets to sense the dock that it's in so it can't use a common magnetic style holster like my Curve but not having a decent holster is not helpful to its success. And finally, the second deal breaker, the Verizon network. Normally I consider their network great, but I got absolutely zero service at work. For 4 hours I would sit at work and not get a single notification or text message. I'd step outside and after a few seconds the messages would begin to pour in. Granted I worked on the first floor in the middle of a 3 story building... but my Curve on Sprint gets a good enough signal there for me to tether to my laptop and watch YouTube videos and none of the users with AT&T Blackberries seem to have connectivity problems anywhere in the building. We have cell phones so we can be reached anywhere... being unreachable for 5 hours a day until I go to lunch and then again for another 5 hours after lunch is simply unacceptable.

jntowers1
jntowers1

I have been trying a Droid and a 3Gs this month. I think you are spot on. Yes, you can customize and tinker with the Droid a LOT more, but it's nowhere near the slick, "just works" experience of the iPhone... and I DO have the 2.1 Android update. There is little I can do on the Droid that I can't do with an iPhone app and it tends to run smoother. Here is the kicker... the voice quality on the Droid (Verizon) is light years better than the iPhone and never drops. Data speeds are faster on ATT, but much less consistent, and that consistency makes a difference... and I'm in a good ATT area (Dallas). The latency feels better on VZW as well. One other significant difference... media. IPhone dominates the Droid in that area. So I guess it really comes down to your priorities and what you're willing to give up for the positives in each.

Sonja Thompson
Sonja Thompson

TR member dcolbert was initially blown away by the Verizon Droid, but now... not so much. He lists 8 of his Droid frustrations. Are there any he missed? Or do you disagree?

HappyHeathen
HappyHeathen

1. The phone performance is just poor. Calls are dropped frequently. Never happened with my KRZR, so I know its not the carrier. 2. The camera is horrible! And yes, I installed the update. My KRZR's was better. 3. No Bluetooth headset voice command recognition for true hands-free use. I was hoping a software update would address the issue, but realized this is a continuing problem with all Android units which Motorola doesn't address. 4. The battery cover continues to fall off. In less than 3 months, I've already lost 2 and have had to order spares just to have them handy. 5. System updates are slow in being released. I'm still waiting for my 2.1 update. Seems the hype got in the way of a clean product release. Too bad "I drank the kool-aid". I may wind up going back to my KRZR.

Tazkruff
Tazkruff

I have and always have been a BlackBerry person, I know something wasn't right with the andriod phones as they were all hyped up in a way as if they had some edge over the other phones but all i see is things that are already on mobile phones nothing new to the game.

kollinblog
kollinblog

It's almost like we have different phones. I have an iPhone 3GS also. I will respond point by point .. 1. i find browsing the two equally usable. Certainly no less usable than iphone, if not more given the greater rez of the droid screen. 2. I don't get the precision thing. I click a link, and it clicks. What more precision is needed? Also you have pinch zoom now in Dolphin and Browser (with 2.1 update). 3. Agreed the fb app isn't as good. It's not an Android OS issue, though, it is primarily because of an agreement apple has with fb that allows iphone version to leverage internal API calls. However, a 3rd part app called bloo keeps all notifications within the app, as well as allowing easy video, image and link posting. 4. I haven't yet been able to not find an app that didn't meet my needs and empower me. You don't list what kinds of apps you don't have on droid you wish you had. 5. e-readers. i cant comment on this, as I don't use. But I see this coming asap given the burgeoning popularity of android devices. Not to mention the higher res screen would prolly be nicer to read on. 6. Hardware. Again, different device? I barely ever have any issues. I'm impressed with it's flawless stability. 7. Yes they both can do funny autocorrects if you're not paying attention :). 8. Battery. This is a really weird one to me. One thing I've been blown away is how good the battery life is. I dimmed my screen to the lowest setting, which is still bright. And I find, even with constant use, 3 push email accounts, web browsing, google talk, twidroid and fb use, I easily get about 18 hours before I need to plug in. So I'm not sure why the disparities, but my experiences are way different.

john_heafer
john_heafer

The author of the article on the shortcomings of the Droid, is either limited in his experience with mobile or limited in skills using today's operating systems.

dcolbert
dcolbert

I'm quite adept with today's operating systems, and as has been discussed elsewhere, I've been using mobile devices since the Casiopeia E115. (I'm not going to count my TRS-80 Model 100 as a "mobile PC"...) ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-80_Model_100 ) Where do you specifically disagree with me, and for what reasons?

deb
deb

I was torn between the Droid and the Omnia II, and went with the Omnia because I am one of those who actually LIKES WinMo. I'm glad now that I did. I get great battery life, I love the Facebook app, and Swype just blows me away every time I use it - I can enter text (accurately) at 50 wpm, amazing for a virtual keyboard. I was impressed by the Droid's GPS app, but if it frequently doesn't work, then I have no remaining reasons to second-think my decision.

krakowski
krakowski

From a very lay perspective, there is also the emotional affinity to associating with the Google effort to transform the internet experience, and now the phone experience. I am aware that the Droid is not at the top of the heap, Nexus 1 probably is for the moment, but I must say, one of the features not mentioned so far on the positive side is that as compared with my previous Blackberry, it is quite a slick experience to waking up the phone and being "right there" whether the internet or an email at the instant of turning on the phone without waiting for emails to load. On the other hand, now that I've mentioned it, one of the very worst features, and I'm 69 with rapidly failing eyesight, is that while appear on the screen at lightning speed, I can't read them without the use of a magnifying glass. They should bundle up a series of magnifying glasses with the phone. I also don't like the fact that there is no facility for moving the "cursor" forward or back which makes correcting typos almost impossible. fingers are too large to precisely position the cursor. I tend to more likely elete and entire word, or string of words,and start all over again. After all I've said , I love the "idea" of being a Droid user.