Storage

TechRepublic Questions of the Week - November 23, 2009

The questions highlighted in this Questions of the Week post address issues with Windows Remote printing through a NetMotion VPN, decrypting files on a portable HDD, re-partitioning a mirrored SBS drive, and more.

With the help from the TechRepublic community, we've compiled a list of questions from last week that had great answers and/or large appeal. If you want to submit your favorite Question of the Week, using those guidelines as criteria, please send them to trol@techrepublic.com.

Here are some highlighted questions from last week:

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Sonja Thompson has worked for TechRepublic since October of 1999. She is currently a Senior Editor and the host of the Smartphones and Tablets blogs.

7 comments
jalbertini
jalbertini

Why won't Windows7, or any version as far as I know, let us determine where we want the user files like My Documents? I want to move these ALL to a different logical or even physical drive so if I need to reinstall Windows I don't wipe out these files!

s31064
s31064

Actually, redefining the location for My Documents was extremely easy in XP. Simply right-click the desktop icon, go to Properties, click the Target tab, and change the location. You then have the option to move what's currently in My Documents to the new location. Alternatively, you can create a shortcut to the current location in the new one. I haven't done this with W7 yet, but let me look at the User folder and get back to you.

jalbertini
jalbertini

Yes, Windows allows moving My Documents but not the entire user account directory such as video, pictures, music, browser & email profiles, etc.

kevaburg
kevaburg

I found that placing the ntuser.dat and user profile settings into a hidden folder inside the users documents folder extremely useful. I wouldn't do it for mandatory profiles but for roaming profiles and directory replication using DFS I found it to be very handy. The other thing to remember is that this only remains uncomplicated for users that use only one computer. In a domain environment it makes no difference simply because the profiles are normally held in a shared network folder that would be backed-up by an administrator anyway and the same (to a point) could be done in a workgroup as well. Another thing to remember as well is that the best way to maintain user documents in a domain is to hold them centrally and if necessary, use offline file and folder synchronisation for redundancy (not fault-tolerance). To that end, it makes sense that all users have all their documents in a similar place on all computers to make any administration locally for administrators easier. This point assumes that users cannot change the location of the My Documents folder for obvious reasons. I am of course assuming this point is aimed at a business network!

s31064
s31064

In XP, video, pictures, music, downloads, etc. are under My Documents, so moving My Documents moves them as well. You can probably write a script that will move your profiles for you and edit the registry. It doesn't really matter where this stuff is as long as Windows knows, which is where the registry edit comes in...

krazy kueen
krazy kueen

Hello everyone, I actually have a lot of things in my mind, and I find it quite difficult to express it, for the time being i wanna ask as if where the data(that one update on net) is stored..? normally people reply saying that there are a lot of servers that hold the data, but d question here is that...do those servers have extreamly large hard disks that store them? if yes, then how much space do these hard disks hav?? and how about the security of the data? how z it secured? I am an engineering student and have lot more questions to ask about.... if anyone here can answer to this freak question, plzzz help me out...... waiting for a reply....soon ypu can also reply to the question on dahiya_iit@yahoo.com thnx regards ankur

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