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Video: Streaming YouTube via HDMI on a Coby Kyros MID 7015

In this short video, TR member dcolbert demonstrates how the $150 Coby Kyros MID 7015 tablet can stream video to your TV via an HDMI cable.

In previous posts, I explained how I obtained a Coby Kyros and how you can actually do more with this low-end tablet for a lot less money.

For example, your Coby Kyros MID 7015 can stream video to your TV via an HDMI cable. Sure, an iPad 2 will be able to do this once you purchase a $30 accessory, but the $150 Coby does it right out of the box.

About

Donovan Colbert has over 16 years of experience in the IT Industry. He's worked in help-desk, enterprise software support, systems administration and engineering, IT management, and is a regular contributor for TechRepublic. Currently, his profession...

8 comments
Awahili Guni
Awahili Guni

I see it as a way of "fights" between the top ranked Graphic Cards and the Monitors and Televisions (yes, televisions can be monitors too) all at the cost of the "customer's pocketbooks"... more $$$$ for us to spend. Is there a difference betwixt the HD and HDMI? Absolutely, I have both; unfortunately, had to shell out big bucks to upgrade on the graphic card to meet the criteria of the HDMI's though. Keep in mind; watch out for the Hz (hertz) for it might not be compatible with your OS. Nevertheless, there IS a critical issue here which is the battle of the "brains"; you have HDMI - 3-D and HDMI LED and HDMI (standard); the quest to meet one's own needs would leave one banging head on the monitor / television itself. Gamer / Graphic / Video / Developer / so on - what does one do when one is a "Heniz 57" (does all of the above) which the HDMI, the need for all becomes imperative but not available, leaving one in the midst of having to make decisions, decisions, decisions (not to mention the graphic card as well). It is a win and lose situation; I find this frustrating on my end - while not so with HD or OCR's, but come now with HDMI, only they would tear it apart where you are literally split apart at the seams. If you had never seen a post like this before, take a test run at any place where they sell computers and ask for a "test or trial run" and you will see exactly what the implications I am in reference to. I have found that nVidia works far better in handling in all the bases with HDMI (especially if you bounce back and forth from cable television and computer and running on the graphic card that has explosive impact; more power to you)! Raedon on the other hand; I won't go there - spare me please! What I did learn with the light sensors, I found it worked best if you shut it off by "disabling" it in the Services, if you have enabled the Graphic Card in Bios and Services and configured the computer to run off of the Graphic Card instead of the GPU (or CPU). I only speak from the Windows' side only, for I cannot answer pertaining to Mac/Apple's side - so if there's a member who can post pertaining to their knowledge, that would be wonderful!

Awahili Guni
Awahili Guni

I see it as a way of "fights" between the top ranked Graphic Cards and the Monitors and Televisions (yes, televisions can be monitors too) all at the cost of the "customer's pocketbooks"... more $$$$ for us to spend. Is there a difference betwixt the HD and HDMI? Absolutely, I have both; unfortunately, had to shell out big bucks to upgrade on the graphic card to meet the criteria of the HDMI's though. Keep in mind; watch out for the Hz (hertz) for it might not be compatible with your OS. Nevertheless, there IS a critical issue here which is the battle of the "brains"; you have HDMI - 3-D and HDMI LED and HDMI (standard); the quest to meet one's own needs would leave one banging head on the monitor / television itself. Gamer / Graphic / Video / Developer / so on - what does one do when one is a "Heniz 57" (does all of the above) which the HDMI, the need for all becomes imperative but not available, leaving one in the midst of having to make decisions, decisions, decisions (not to mention the graphic card as well). It is a win and lose situation; I find this frustrating on my end - while not so with HD or OCR's, but come now with HDMI, only they would tear it apart where you are literally split apart at the seams. If you had never seen a post like this before, take a test run at any place where they sell computers and ask for a "test or trial run" and you will see exactly what the implications I am in reference to. I have found that nVidia works far better in handling in all the bases with HDMI (especially if you bounce back and forth from cable television and computer and running on the graphic card that has explosive impact; more power to you)! Raedon on the other hand; I won't go there - spare me please! What I did learn with the light sensors, I found it worked best if you shut it off by "disabling" it in the Services, if you have enabled the Graphic Card in Bios and Services and configured the computer to run off of the Graphic Card instead of the GPU (or CPU). I only speak from the Windows' side only, for I cannot answer pertaining to Mac/Apple's side - so if there's a member who can post pertaining to their knowledge, that would be wonderful!

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Now all I need is a TV with an HDMI input! :D

pfyearwood
pfyearwood

How does the web browser come across on TV, mainly Hulu+ or other streaming services? Would sure be easier to use than dragging a full computer to the living room. Paul

dcolbert
dcolbert

I haven't explored very much with Hulu or other streaming video. This is less the fault of my Kyros than it is the fault of the entertainment console my wife put our TV in, which hides the side-mounted HDMI ports from easy access. My experience has been that streaming of any sort can start off choppy and can also be choppy if just about any other app runs while streaming is taking place. If you're picky about this, then the Coby probably isn't the device for you. I'd find it livable, I think, as an inexpensive, multi-purpose alternative to a Boxee or other dedicated content streaming box. As one example, I stream Pandora wirelessly to this device fairly frequently. The first song, for 10-30 seconds, there may be some stuttering and choppiness. Then it seems to buffer and from there on out it works really well - unless I try to switch tasks or otherwise put additional load on the CPU. I can read an eBook and stream audio via Pandora. When I first open the book, a little choppy - then it is fine with turning a page, as another example. I think part of the problem lies in the fact that there aren't a lot of dedicated, native streaming video apps for Android. You've got everything you need here, with the Coby Kyros to *do* it, but you're going to have to be a bit of a hacker/kludger to get all the pieces together. Which is kind of the Android philosophy... the *ability* to do something, if you want to go to the effort and deal with the hassles to actually get it done. For example, I watched "Internet Teen sensation" Rebecca Black's video "Friday" on YouTube on the Kyros recently. It started off choppy and was dropping frames. But after 10 or 15 seconds, I was suffering every monotonous frame and monotone lyric. If I had it outputting it to HDMI, it would have been in full 42" HD glory on my tv with full surround sound. I'll try that this week, and get video - just so you can suffer along with me. And I'll look into the rest and see if I can dig up more information. I'd say your best bet is to hit the Android tablet forums and talk to some of the experts though, to see if it is suitable to what you have in mind. I'd say that it isn't ready for prime time as a *consumer* solution for what you're talking about. I'm pretty sure of that much.

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