Enterprise Software

Apply quotas with individual file shares with Windows Server 2003 R2

Windows Server 2003 R2 allows administrators to apply quotas to individual shares on a file server. This can be useful if you need to: monitor the use of file shares in your environment; keep user home directories at a manageable size; or limit the amount of data that users can store in a share to conserve disk space.

Windows Server 2003 R2 allows administrators to apply quotas to individual shares on a file server. This can be useful if you need to: monitor the use of file shares in your environment; keep user home directories at a manageable size; or limit the amount of data that users can store in a share to conserve disk space. You may also find these features helpful for tracking resource usage and disallowed file types. (Note that you may need to install the File Server Resource Management utilities for quotas to work.)

Configuring quotas and quota templates on shared folders

When upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2, you will need to install the File Server Resource Manager application following the steps below. (Windows may ask for the Windows Server 2003 CD-ROM to complete these steps.)

  1. Open Add/Remove Programs in the Control Panel.
  2. Select Windows Components.
  3. Select the Management And Monitoring Tools option from the component list and click Details.
  4. Check the box next to File Server Resource Manager (FSRM) and click OK. When the tools installation completes, the newly added MMC console will appear under the Administrative Tools folder on the Windows Start menu.

To add a quota to a shared folder, follow these steps:

  1. Open the FSRM.
  2. In the left pane, expand Quota Management.
  3. Select Quotas.
  4. Right-click in the right pane and choose Create Quota from the context menu. This will open a dialog box containing the settings needed to create a quota for a given folder.

In the new window, you can choose to set the quota against a specific folder or turn it on for all existing folders. (For simplicity's sake, I specify a folder in this tip.)

  1. Enter or browse to the share path on which you wish to create a quota.
  2. Choose how you would like to assign quota information from these two options:

  • Select Derive Properties From This Quota Template (Recommended) and then choose a template in the drop-down box.
  • Define Custom Quota Properties and click the Custom Properties button. (I select this method because quota templates are an easy way to keep track of quotas.)

Once you select the template, the details of the template will appear in the box at the bottom of the dialog box.

  1. Click Create to add the quota.

Microsoft includes a few preconfigured templates to assist in assigning quotas to folders. You can use these or create your own templates by completing the following steps:

  1. In the File Server Resource Manager, expand Quota Management.
  2. In the left pane of the window, select Quota Templates.
  3. Right-click the Details pane of the FSRM window and choose Create Quota Template. This will open a dialog box, allowing you to specify the settings for your template.

If you want to use an existing template to create your new quota template, select the desired template from the Copy Properties From Quota Template drop-down box at the top of the dialog box. Then complete the remaining fields of the dialog box. Templates allow you to save and reuse quota settings, saving time in the future.

  1. Specify a name for your template, such as Folder Shares Limit.
  2. If you wish, specify a label for your template to alert users of the quota.
  3. Specify a limit and unit of disk space. You can measure units in KB, MB, GB, or TB.
  4. Specify the limit type as either hard limit or soft limit:

  • Hard limit. This does not allow users to exceed the specified limit.
  • Soft limit. This allows users to exceed the limit; this type is used primarily for monitoring.

  1. Specify one or more notification thresholds.
  2. Click OK to complete the creation of a Quota Template.

Note: You can use quota thresholds to send alerts or notifications to users or administrators when the specified threshold reaches its limit. Along with alerts, quota thresholds can also record event log entries containing this information. Additionally, multiple thresholds may be useful if you are watching a folder using a quota and want to send an alert at a predetermined point before the quota you are monitoring. For example, set one quota to send out an alert when a monitored folder is within 10 Mb of the threshold, then another at the threshold.

Miss a Windows Server 2003 tip?

Check out the Windows Server 2003 archive, and catch up on the most useful tips from this newsletter.

Stay on top of the latest Windows Server 2003 tips and tricks with our free Windows Server newsletter, delivered each Wednesday. Automatically sign up today!

About

Derek Schauland has been tinkering with Windows systems since 1997. He has supported Windows NT 4, worked phone support for an ISP, and is currently the IT Manager for a manufacturing company in Wisconsin.

9 comments
gareth.hooper
gareth.hooper

Can this be deployed after the fact, IE. we already have deployed shared folder structure across numerous drives. Will installing this for folder quota management afterwards have any impact?

Guerzizeb
Guerzizeb

Very good, that what i am looking for.

anhdaopn
anhdaopn

Hi, Thank you for the post. I have Windows 2003 R1 updated through WU and the Add or Remove Windows Components does not include fsrm. I have downloaded fsrm.exe from MS website, but when I tried installing it on the server, it said the version mismatched? Is there any ways to install fsrm on server 2003 sp2 updated from sp1 without cd disc? Can I install fsrm on XP and monitor shared folders from that PC?

aungsatpo
aungsatpo

can i get the quota service in 2003 server without active directory?

dineshtns
dineshtns

very useful I want one doubt user creation for windows2000 server. How to create user creation in command via new or unit.

myidavinash
myidavinash

Yes you can apply for local users but it will be only for partitions not for folders.means you have to apply it over all individual systems

wingoc
wingoc

install on existing server.

Riverwind
Riverwind

I like the soft limit that only alerts the administrator rather than just one cut-off

Editor's Picks