Cloud

Infographic: Small businesses and the cloud

This infographic offers a quick snapshot of small businesses and their use of cloud software, as well as the top three cloud-friendly cities in the U.S.

This infographic, courtesy of JESS3 and Microsoft365, takes a look at the cloud landscape for small businesses. Infographic resources include data from Gartner, IDC, and Forrester.

Click graphic to enlarge.

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Selena has been at TechRepublic since 2002. She is currently a Senior Editor with a background in technical writing, editing, and research. She edits Data Center, Linux and Open Source, Apple in the Enterprise, The Enterprise Cloud, Web Designer, and...

7 comments
trcbit
trcbit

Where do these guys get their stats from? I have been watching the cloud space for some time an have been hearing some very over stated claims as to how many SMB's are actually using the cloud in their business. If you include Smart Phones usage for email as cloud use then yes, but mainstream SMB's in my experience do not use cloud based services due to security concerns and concerns especially around having their data stored with another firm. How about we do some real research on exactly what SMB's are using. I think the whole Cloud phenomena is over hyped, there are a lot of large firms really pushing to get into this space and are spending a lot of money on advertising, bit like global warming!

ericjones.cc
ericjones.cc

Such a nice way to describe things with this infographics. Yes, it is true that Cloud Computing has made life easy to business individuals and entities by giving around 100% uptime and wide range of possibility to explore the web with cloud servers. Just came across with a lucrative article on Small Businesses Benefits from Cloud! http://www.cloudreviews.com/blog/small-businesses-cloud

Regulus
Regulus

I've really got to thank you for the formatting of this info-graphic. For me, I need to drop these into a Word Doc. I use maximum sizes of 7.5" w or 10" l. This one fit right in at 7.49"w. Too often I have to squeeze these down to where they are no longer legible and, are, therefore unusable. Keep up the good work, thanks & Seasons Greetings!

rosborneutah
rosborneutah

If you're in a major city with fast connectivity and can get your cloud-apps to work, yes. But if you're in a rural area where internet is still at dial-up speeds, forget it. The Cloud is still murky and we're a long way from being instantly and productively connected via cloud apps. Client-side apps are much more responsive, and will be for a few years yet, I predict.

wizard57m-cnet
wizard57m-cnet

only a child would believe! Yet another blog post with a solution in search of a problem. Cloud...why not call it what it is...hosted solutions in which you give some entity somewhere all your data for a monthly fee, that may or may not be financially feasible. Same old time-share rental of mainframe computing that we had pre-1982.

Alpha_Dog
Alpha_Dog

...but largely irrelevant or misleading if you live in a rural area or choose not to use Microsoft products.

seanferd
seanferd

Look at the pretty pictures! Look at the numbers! (Which we aren't going to validate in any way, probably because we can't.) See, everyone else is doing it. Now you jump off the bridge, too.

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