Windows Server

Install the Hyper-V Manager feature in Windows Server 2008 R2

Hyper-V as a standalone install doesn't provide much of an interface to manage virtual machines. Virtualization expert Rick Vanover shows how to remotely manage a Hyper-V server.

The Hyper-V Manager feature can be installed on any Windows Server 2008 system. If the Hyper-V Server is Hyper-V 2008 R2, I recommend only attempting to manage that class of hypervisor on Windows Server 2008 R2 systems.

When it comes to deploying Hyper-V servers, there are two main options: install the standalone Hyper-V hypervisor or add the Hyper-V feature to a supported Windows Server 2008 R2 server. I'm going to take the separation approach as I venture into Hyper-V and use the standalone Hyper-V hypervisor instead of the full installation of Windows Server 2008 R2 and adding the Hyper-V role.

The Hyper-V standalone install is a single-purpose, standalone distribution. It loosely resembles Windows Server Core, and can be plugged into all of the management frameworks, including Group Policy, PowerShell, Hyper-V Manager, System Center Virtual Machine Manager (SCVMM), and Remote Management.

The Hyper-V Manager tool is the simplest way to manage a Hyper-V host, and it can be added to any server system. To add Hyper-V Manager, open Server Manager and navigate to the Features section (Figure A). Figure A

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Once the feature is installed, Hyper-V Manager will be available in the Administrative Tools area of the Start Menu. From there, the first step is to connect to a remote server. Figure B shows Hyper-V Manager connected to two Hyper-V servers. Figure B

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Before you can create virtual machines on the Hyper-V hosts enumerated in Hyper-V Manager, the host networking will need to be configured. Hyper-V supports three types of networks: External, Internal, and Private. These networks loosely equate to bridged, NAT, and host-only network modes from other hypervisors, respectively. The network for the host is created as shown in Figure C. This environment does not have a VLAN tag in use, but the Configuration tab is available. Figure C

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Be sure to use a dedicated network interface for the Hyper-V networking configuration. You will find that the connection of the Hyper-V Server is removed in favor of this configuration entered for the guest virtual machine networks. Because of this the Allow Management Operating System To Share This Adapter should be unchecked. Now Hyper-V Manager is ready to deploy virtual machines.

Have you automated the install of Hyper-V Manager or otherwise deployed this feature? Let us know in the discussion.

About

Rick Vanover is a software strategy specialist for Veeam Software, based in Columbus, Ohio. Rick has years of IT experience and focuses on virtualization, Windows-based server administration, and system hardware.

6 comments
ram_swarnam
ram_swarnam

I have started a test in my lab. An ISP connnection thru Forefront to a HP Proliant Server. On this server I installed W2K8 Server R2 with Hyper V. After that one virtual server with DNS, DC and DHCP Another virtual server as a Fileserver and another virtual server as an Anti- Virus Server. I got the DHCP server working as I could set up a client on a seperate normal desktop to browse Internet etc. Somehow I cannot get to the Hyper V Server below the virtual servers thru the network. I have checked the network settings on the Hyper V server and it has got two. One of them is the static one I assigned and the second is APIPA. I'd appreciate if anybody could triggger some more checkings

knudson
knudson

I run Hyper-V on Server Core, I believe it is the same for Win2008 with Hyper-V role. I manage it from Win7 and one of the Virtual machines within it. You need to open the firewalls to allow the management consoles to work, these are on the host and the machine running the management console !!! You'll get an RPC call failed. Well unless you just shutdown the firewalls completely, which is an alternative. But not a good one.

brandon.kindle
brandon.kindle

You will have a few options on the physical adaptors for the 'Host' OS that you need to investigate. If using two adaptors (or more) which is highly recommended, you should have the following scenarios: 1. Adaptor for the Host Windows server - bound to IPv4 - bound to IPv6 - Unbound to the Hyper-V Virtual network 2. Adaptor for the virtual hosts - unbound to IPv4 - unbound to IPv6 - bound to the Hyper-V Virtual network You will need a Virtual network created in the Hyper-V manager which the network adaptor you wish to use for the virtual machines is selected. The virtual guests will be connection to the network such as this: Windows virtual host --> Internal TCP/IP Stack --> Virtual adaptor --> Microsoft Hyper-V virtual network --> Bindings in the Host OS --> Physical adaptor on the host OS that is bound to the Virtual network in the host OS --> Physical network (such as the switch that the network adaptor is physically attached to) Take note that the Hyper-V host and guests will communicate through their adaptors through a physical switch as there is no IP binding on the adaptor that is connected to the Hyper-V virtual network. I hope this helps!

mliang83
mliang83

Never shutdown your own firewall, no matter what it is. The only best firewall in this world is the layer 1 of the OSI Model. Once it disconnected from the port, you will never have to be afraid of being hacked to any of your servers. Please correct me if I am wrong.

brandon.kindle
brandon.kindle

Layer 1 represents voltage changes, 1's and 0's. A layer 2 'transparent firewall' has no IP address involved in the passing of traffic. The traffic up to even layer 7 can be analyzed by the OS/CPU/Software (as appropriately involved) yet the firewall would allow no direct connection as there is an absence of upper layer (IP, Port) connections available to 'public' traffic. The firewall operates on Layer 2 passing of Ethernet traffic (typical protocol involved) which is a layer 2 protocol (IEEE 802.3). The firewall gets the traffic due to it being the next point to point connection required to get to the next router or layer 3 firewall in the path to the internal or next network.

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