Disaster Recovery

New solid state drive data protection available

Rick Vanover shows how a new storage product from ioSafe can protect small or medium business data, as well as home users.

The ioSafe series of storage devices offer a number of fireproof and waterproof storage devices. At CES 2010, the new ioSafe Solo SSD series of devices were released. This series of the heavily protected storage system offers data protection for medium-size businesses and shock protection for small businesses and home users.

In a previous post, I wrote about how the ioSafe devices provide serious protection against fire and water. With the SSD model, the addition of shock protection addresses the major shortcoming of this series of durable storage. Figure A shows the ioSafe Solo SSD. Figure A

The ioSafe enclosure is made of quarter-inch thick steel and seriously rugged. The enclosure protects the drive against shock up to a 20 foot drop and can sustain 1000g of shock for 1 ms with no data loss. It can also be crushed with a load of up to 5,000 pounds. The fire protection for the device is up to 1550°F for a half hour. The water protection protects the enclosure for 30 days in up to 30 feet of water.

The ioSafe Solo SSD is the first solid state storage product for this series and connects via USB or eSATA interfaces. Other products by ioSafe include NAS servers that connect over Ethernet. The network attached products do not currently have an SSD offering that will provide shock protection, but this may change as product lines mature. Also, the current SSD offerings do not offer a RAID solution for the disk protection.

From a practicality standpoint, this is an additional tier of data protection. Of course, off-site protection is ideal for all types of data. Adding off-site backups with an online storage may be an attractive option for off-site protection. Possible obstacles may be bandwidth and service plan costs; in those situations, disaster proofing the storage devices may be a logical step.

Check out this related CNET photo gallery: IoSafe extreme 'demo-lition.'

Do you have a need to seriously protect data from physical harm? Does a product like this appeal to your data protection strategy? If so, share your comments in the discussion.

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About

Rick Vanover is a software strategy specialist for Veeam Software, based in Columbus, Ohio. Rick has years of IT experience and focuses on virtualization, Windows-based server administration, and system hardware.

12 comments
detours
detours

Seems like a great product for what it does ... but what about lightning strikes? The datasheet on their website gives electrical requirements as - 80 ~ 264 VAC at 50/60 HZ. But no word on electrical surges. I wonder if the unit's power supply has a fuse. Of course, if you're that worried, you should install a whole-house surge protector and use a UPS.

gregory.heins
gregory.heins

I'm wondering if this method would protect against EMP attack? Would someone please let me know?

amkolesar
amkolesar

this is a great idea! The only thing is you would need CAPITAL to buy a product like this. Maybe they can find a way to keep COST down. You really can't compare this to an off-site storage facility because they aren't APPLES TO APPLES

oscar.lozano
oscar.lozano

In areas such as the Caribbean, Florida, Texas, etc. This solution comes in handy, since these areas are often impacted by Hurricanes, Tornados, heavy rain among others. Iwould definitely buy one for my home. I would also love to see an Enterprise solution of this kind.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

What source of EMP are you anticipating? Most of the ones I can think of will leave me with more important things to worry about than data.

TheChas
TheChas

Looking at the price of the ioSafe, there is no way that the device is designed to survive an EMP pulse. A solid state storage device that would hold over 500 GB of data would cost much more than 10X the $250 that the 500 GB ioSafe sells for. 100 or even 1000 times the price may be low. Aside from what it would cost to have a storage device survive an EMP pulse, what are you going to do with it after the Nuclear explosion? On the presumption that you are far enough away from the blast to survive and have access to safe food and water, how would you retrieve your data? In the event of an EMP pulse, all computers and networks for miles away would be damaged or destroyed. If you even had any source of power available, you would not have a device to use to retrieve your data. Chas

davidt
davidt

So, we need (so far): 1. Various available capacities 2. Transfer speed (upgradable to USB 3.0?) 3. EMP Protection Data

Kevin@Quealy.net
Kevin@Quealy.net

I use it to backup some data I can't get off site. I feel a little better knowing that there's a water sprinkler hovering right over my server rack which is too expensive to replace. :( However, I still have my most important data taken off site. There's one disaster the IoSafe definately cannot protect against: someone breaking in and walking off with it. However, there is a handy spot to connect a pad lock or chain to it so it you make it a little harder to walk away.

cdiazb
cdiazb

How fast is it (MBPS) and how large is in Capacity (TB)?

santeewelding
santeewelding

What they're expecting is not the Russians. What they're expecting is a carload of kids and a baseball bat driving by and whacking it. When I read about the one-quarter inch steel plate, I instantly thought about rural mailboxes. The pulse they are subject to is not electromagnetic. It is, the baseball bat pulse (BBP). I have personally, more than a few times, constructed honeypot mailboxes of quarter-inch plate welded to three-inch schedule 40 pipe in turn embedded deep down into concrete. This is so that, in the morning, the box owner, going out to collect the mail, sees a hand holding a baseball bat, the hand contiguous with a severed arm, deposited violently that night by BBP.

A.C
A.C

google iosafe.. you'll then find a useful thing called a "website", where the manufacturer has a presence that allows you to interact with them in a way where they can answer all your queries... oh, the wonders of the modern internet...

davidt
davidt

You make some good points. I'll check out that "internet" thing that you speak of. Meanwhile, your initials "As8Ho** Creep" stand the test of time. Good Day, Sir.

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