Storage

Physically destroy your hard disk for security

Have a whole bunch of hard disks with potentially confidential information on-board? Another solution - other than doing lots of tedious data wipes, might be to physically destroy them with a device like the patent pending Hard Disk Crusher by EDR Solutions.

Have a whole bunch of hard disks with potentially confidential information on-board? Another solution - other than doing lots of tedious data wipes, might be to physically destroy them with a device like the patent-pending Hard Disk Crusher by EDR Solutions.

The Hard Disk Crusher promises to keep your confidential information, well - confidential, by permanently destroying it via a crushing mechanism operated via a standard 110 outlet. The idea is that it is simpler and faster than a data wipe, taking just 10 seconds to crush a disk.

Crushed HDD

According to EDR's Web site:

With the Hard Disk Crusher you can crush over 60 disks an hour. It drills through the hard disk's spindles and physically creates ripples in the platters making it impossible to recover the data.

Gearlog, received one thoroughly destroyed hard disk and noted that the $11,500 price tag is expensive, though it probably cannot be compared to the potential cost of identify theft.

About

Paul Mah is a writer and blogger who lives in Singapore, where he has worked for a number of years in various capacities within the IT industry. Paul enjoys tinkering with tech gadgets, smartphones, and networking devices.

73 comments
mrwizard10
mrwizard10

Do what one company did..their Boss would hold a quarterly party at his house. Those folks who did good stuff during the last quarter would be the chance to shoot at decommissioned HDs using one of his weapons, including the 50 cal. High motivation in that company

demonkiller_777
demonkiller_777

I erase a hard disk with my 12 gauge... 5 shells usually does it.

WoW > Work
WoW > Work

Just make the hard drives watch Glitter with Mariah Carey, the hard drives will destroy themselves to get out of watching it all. Actually, at work, we use DBAN, then have a company shred or incinerate them.

ryk
ryk

If we look at the practice of media hard drive sanitization the NIST defines the levels of sanitization (in special report 800-88) as being Clear, Purge, and Physical. With: Clear being susceptible to keyboard attack / laboratory reconstruction efforts. Purge not being susceptible to Laboratory reconstruction efforts. Physical being the absolute mechanical destruction of the device beyond any recovery efforts. First off, as of mid-2006 DOD 5220 was retired, and the NIST is now the recognized CSA for data destruction guidance. The fact that most software products reference DoD 5220 to this day is due to the less than favorable light the NIST 800-88 affords external Clear based overwrite processes. Likewise, in Dod Industrial security letter ISL-2007-01 dated October 11, 2007 it states: ???There are currently no overwriting products or process that has been evaluated in accordance with the NIAP Common Criteria Evaluation and Validation Scheme (CCEVS).???????????????..???Effective immediately, DSS will no longer approve overwriting procedures for the sanitization or downgrading (e.g. release to lower level classified information controls) of IS storage devices (e.g., hard drives) used for classified processing.??? So, clearly there is a lot of concerns about the effectiveness of overwrite utilities, and considering the time required to complete the process, the investment in time to clear a device makes the process less than efficient. This leaves us with Purge technologies such as Degaussing and Secure Erase; or Purge technologies such as shredding, disintegration, smelting, etc. Degaussing is a great technology for soft media technologies such as tape or floppy, but is not as reliable when processing Hard drives. The reason behind this statement is not that the practice does not work, rather, there are many factors that must be respected in order for it to work effectively. Degaussing is the practice of applying sufficient magnetic force to achieve coercion of all media surfaces encased in the HDA assembly. Considering the advances in media density necessary to accommodate super high capacity storage, the amount of force necessary to purge the device will require a degausser of sufficient power to achieve successful coercion. Therefore the technician operating the degausser should be trained to evaluate the ability of the degausser to effectively purge the media surfaces. Add to this the condition where the electromagnetic components and the electronics are typically deactivated before the media is sanitized, and we now have to contend with the fact that the media may have recoverable data despite the issue that the device is electronically and mechanically inoperable. At the end of the process, the device is e-waste, and can not be reused. Proper physical destruction is an effective means to sanitize a drive. However, I use the word 'proper' as there are many ineffective and downright dangerous means being prescribed for physical destruction. First off, calling in your cousin Bubba to take a sledge hammer to your drives may be amusing and may be considered suitable for destroying your personal drive, but I assure you, that cousin Bubba will not meet the objectives of any responsible organizational policy. When dealing with Top Secret and Secret level information there must be 'absolutely no means possible to reconstruct the data from the device after decommissioning'. Referencing the specifications as stated by the Center for Magnetic Recording Research at the University of California San Diego, effective physical destruction by shredding or disintegration is achieved when the resulting media particles are of a diameter smaller than can accommodate a complete 512KB data block, or smaller than 1/250th of an inch (this spec was 1/125th of an inch until recently). Which means that the screen size for the particles resulting from physically shredding a drive is no longer adequate to effectively meet the requirement of 'absolute destruction beyond reconstruction by any means'. Using the EDR physical destruction technology to bore a conical hole into the HDA chassis will effectively make the device non-operational, but fails to meet the requirements for protecting data that is secret or top secret. Perhaps this technology is acceptable for some who have lower level classifications of data, but it will not meet the higher level specs. This leaves Secure Erase, which is a purge level technology developed by the Center for Magnetic Recording research at the University of California San Diego which is part of the ATA specification. the development of SE was initiated at the request of the NSA with the participation of 6 of the major hard drive manufacturers as a means to create a standards based embedded and reliable sanitization technology into hard drives. As of 2001 all SATA, IDE, Laptop and PATA drives (and optionally as early as 1999)are manufactured with secure Erase embedded in the drive control electronics. A SCSI version of this protocol exists, but inclusion in to the drive microcode is optional and not part of the SCSI standard. Secure Erase is an internal purge process that sanitizes all writable regions of the storage media including the protected Service areas of the drive such as G-list (dynamic bad block list) regions, Host Protected Area (typically manufacture utilities, and restore images) and the regions excluded by the device configuration overlay (programmed drive size limits and geometry information), essentially the entire drive. Intended to be launched by software command, SE never made it to prime time as a software based product due to host incompatibilities, many of which were engineered into most PC's to protect the storage devices from being decimated by virus exploit or malware. These limitations are typically due to BIOS protection, and host controller hardware limits. This is why the best way to launch SE is using hardware based appliances that overcome both the hardware limitations, and the BIOS protection. The process is highly effective and efficient and can process a 100 Gig device in as little as 17 Minutes per 100 Gig of volume space... and it leaves the processed device void of any artifacts, and entirely re-usable and ready for redeployment. As a portable appliance based approach SE can be used on-site as a reliable means to purge legacy or end-of-life hard drive storage devices. Likewise, Top Secret and Secret environments, or any other environment that has policy requiring physical destruction, the ability to mitigate liability inherited by handing off unprotected storage hardware to a transport company to deliver the drives to an external service provider for off-site physical destruction. In this case, a device would be purged on-site before handing off the device to the carrier. Any loss of a purged device will mitigate potential disclosure of any confidential data. A pioneer in the appliance market is a company based in Portsmouth New Hampshire called Ensconce Data Technology, who produces a reliable appliance based product that can effectively act as a single point of sanitization. Others have attempted copying this technology with limited success. Any questions or comments on the statements made can be addressed to me on-line in this forum or at fedelst@gmail.com

nepenthe0
nepenthe0

I doubt there has been a thread conferring more jollification than this one. I'm having a hard time getting my work done because I'm laughing all day. Paul Mah, thanks. Don't do this too often, or my [i]productivity[/i] will plummet... Rick/portland, OR

blarman
blarman

Just use a screwdriver and unscrew the case screws. Vent the disks to air and they are toast - not because of the air but because of contamination. You could even disassemble the HAA (Head-Arm Assembly) and the HDA (Disk stack). Then hang the disks on your cubicle wall or use them for signalling mirrors when hiking (the hole in the center is perfect for aligning your aim). You can also find a nice, long hallway and have contests to see who can roll their disk the farthest (this was more fun when drives used 5-1/4" or 7"+ platters). Take it from a guy who used to build hard drives: contamination is more effective than most magnetic wipes. Simply opening the drive is usually enough to damage the platters beyond repair.

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

Take em out to the gun range and set up for target practice. A well placed 30.06 round should put it into about oh...I'd say 50 pieces :) Hey - this is a really fun subject!

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

I use a Big Friggin Hammer.... Kidding. Sounded funny in my head anyway! But actually, I have used a hammer to whack up some drives before. But, paying 11 Grand? Yikes, if your Capital budget had the cushion ... I say go for it.

scotts
scotts

I work in the government... The cheapest most effective way we have found to destroy a drive is to wipe it with a DoD approved app (DriveErase Pro) and then give the hard drives to the public works guys who like to plasma cut, drill, and smash things... They have tested the jaws of life on a HDD.

rvanrooyen
rvanrooyen

Man... Which of the hard drive manufacturers got together and told us this would be a good idea. Can you imagine the auto industry telling us that we leave DNA traces in our cars, so instead of selling the used car, we should trash the car???? Good Lord what a waste of money, materials and sophisticated technology... Are you really telling me that we cannot effectively wipe a hard drive??? Is it really necessary to destroy this material and technology. When are we going to figure out that it isn't just about our time, but the time it takes to manufacture, the materials and energy wasted in manufacturing this stuff! QUIT THROWING EVERYTHING AWAY!

reisen55
reisen55

Dumpsters have long been filled with the most interesting data, both in hard drives and paper data. The latter in a moment. Corporations and normal folk toss out entire computers, and I have retrieved more than a few good ones (some with nothing more wrong than a forgotten BIOS password). Time is not taken to even format the drive or, better, zero out the sectors. Paper - a major hospital chain in New York City has a data center in Secaucus, NJ and a consultant who was my manager in a past job - found paper printout of live patient data in the dumpster, not shredded, just bundled up and toss out. Compared to this stupdity .....

Dr_Bill
Dr_Bill

I've now read all the replies and I saw no reference to explosives. Howcum?

JeffDeWitt
JeffDeWitt

We destroy a LOT of hard drives with a $250 Northern Tool arbor press with a pneumatically powered bottle jack. Including adding Plexiglas shields we have less than $500 in the thing and it works great... 50 to 100 drives a day, sometimes a lot more.

mjd420nova
mjd420nova

How about complete dissassembly of the drive unit?? The platters make nice wind chimes. I personally use a degaussing coil previouslt used to degauss large CRT's. I works well and completely wipes any data from the drive. I keep and identify the drive circuit boards for future repair of other units in the case where users drives have failed and could be recovered by replacement of the board.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Damn, I want THAT company's name, and definitely the dork...er, person...in charge of purchasing. Sales reps must be lining up at the door for any custoemrs who bought this 'unique device'. They joke about selling ice cubes to Eskimos but this is exactly why, some people can be sold literally ANYTHING. As JD said, that's an expensive hammer, but I can think of a plethora of common tools in my garage that would do the same and worse damage in the same or less time. Even a decent drive, which is hard to find these days, can be FUBAR'd in seconds. Now design a hard drive guaranteed to never die, break or crash and you've got something worth money, most companies build hard drives that self destruct beyond usability after one year anyway.

mlrodman
mlrodman

$11,500 You gotta be kidding. It does sound like something the government would waste our tax dollars on by buying one.

Dr_Bill
Dr_Bill

I can destroy one in under a minute. All I need is a hammer and a hard surface. If you insist on using only the right tools, for under $100 you can get a big hammer and anvil. For under $20, you can get the big hammer and go out in the parking lot.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

Phillips Screwdriver Hammer Place screwdriver over where the platters are Hit screwdriver with hammer until the screwdriver punctures the case and shatters the platters. I do this a few times to be sure. Also, I then (if bored enough) use HDD magnets around the broken drive just because. Other items that work well. -- Drill Press. Make sure it is secure first or it may cause problems. Throwing against a concrete surface -- make sure no people/cars are around first. Dremmel rotary tool -- this is just fun, but cut it up and or mangle it in a myriad of ways, including 'polishing' the platters :D powerful electromagnet -- I have used one before, but I never attempted to get data from it afterwards. It was supposed to wipe the drives. Take the top off, plug it in and when it spins up, use a screwdriver (very lightly) to touch the platter. -- 2 problems here, first, only 1 side of 1 platter can be reached :( 2, if you push too hard, it WILL hurt and platter pieces fly pretty far (take my word on it).

donfuller
donfuller

The Hard Disk Crusher costs what? Ball Peen hammer works great!!!!

nepenthe0
nepenthe0

I have heard that advanced technologies can recover data even from reformatted drives: http://www.recovermyfiles.com/ The only solution I trust is destruction. That said, I have found the platters useful as personal mirrors. Grind off the case rivets with a Dremel tool, unscrew the platters from their spindle, and distribute the platters to family members and friends. Rick/Portland, OR

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

to get payback on $11,500. Most manufacturing facilities have some sort of machine shop. The guys here have a great time coming up with new ways to physically destroy a hard drive.

jtrgovich
jtrgovich

Here's a good case-in-point of why physical destruction isn't always the best solution. While speaking with a manager at a company (I do work for them from time to time), they were going to decommission a computer that was being replaced. Because it could contain personal information they were concerned with just getting rid of it without sanitatizingn the hard drive. One of the manager said she'd planned on taking a hammer to it. My personal thoughts are first, why destroy a perfectly good piece of hardware needlessly. But more importantly, "physical destruction" shouldn't imply just damaging the drive beyond use. Granted busting up the controller hardware will ensure it's never used in a conventional manner again. However, it's very LIKELY (depending on how much damage is done to the platters) that data can be recovered thru laboratory means. That also includes drilling holes; you've only damaged the areas drilled away--nothing else! This individual (like many other non-IT management) is ignorant to the inner workings. I'm glad this article touched on this point. Also, I've taken apart several hard drives and I will say this: those platters are strong! Also don't think for a minute that such recovery is far fetched. There are plenty of companies that will perform this type of recovery for anyone with money (generally a couple hundred to a thousand or more). In my opinion the best approach is employing full drive encryption on all drives w/either sensitive data or portable drives (notebook, etc). Then you can simply delete the encryption keys off the TPM and the data is made virtually unrecoverable--providing of course you use a good encryption algorithm. Vista Ent./Ultimate & Win Server 2k8 have BitLocker. Use AES with a 256-bit key for maximum protection. The other option is using the secure erase features of hard disks or overwriting the disk. With overwriting, there's a couple of things to keep in mind. 1.) Make sure to choose a well tested, proven program that can be booted from external media (CD, floppy, etc). This ensures all the space is actually available for overwrite. I would recommend performing at least 3 passes (0's, 1's, psudo-random). If you're really paranoid or handle other people's sensitive data using the 35-pass Gutmann method (it should also ensure each track is completely overwritten). The only crevet, it's time consuming. It's not a big deal though--just set it up and walk away. Here's a good page with more info: Hope this clears stuff up!

paulmah
paulmah

Well, I did intend to write another article in the same vein... But if you're looking for more laugher, do check out the couple of pieces I wrote about server room shenanigans. Yes - there are actually IT folks with worse bosses/situations than your own around. :) Regards, Paul Mah.

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

just opening them will do nothing in this case

JeffDeWitt
JeffDeWitt

As a part of our process any machine with a hard drive gets at least 1x scrub. If the scrub is successful then the drive is reused, if it is not it gets destroyed. Yes we destroy a lot of drives, but it's a small percentage of the ones we process.

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

C4, Cemtex is uh... well - Illegal LOL

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

however Palmetto is right, explosives means more problems (unless done illegally). And to add -- there would be a large mess to clean up.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Bits for a drill press are cheaper, last a lot longer, and you don't have all those pesky OSHA / Homeland Sec regulations to evade.

Realvdude
Realvdude

But they were too late for you, because you solved the problem. 50 to 100 drives a day? Do you have to be bonded to handle the drives and do you have to certify or otherwise guarantee their destruction? Just curious as to what industry you serve having to destroy that many drives on a daily basis.

Dr_Bill
Dr_Bill

I suspect that data could be recovered from your wind chimes, even after the degaussing. TV degaussing coils are not intense enough. Try it on magnetic tape and, while noisier and softer, they still play. A tape bulk eraser should do the job.

TechieRob
TechieRob

The platters work well keeping birds of fruit trees / roses. When the sun hits them, the reflection usually scares them off We used to use CDs for this purpose, but they fade after a while. Platters will eventually rust, but they last much longer!

petbutterfly
petbutterfly

If you have data protected by federal law (HIPAA for the health industry, and doesn't Sarbanes-Oxley dictate protection of financial data too to name a couple) the higher ups like having some sort of CYA certification that the data has been destroyed to a particular degree of non-recoverability before it is tossed in the garbage... I work for a HMO and while I can have as much fun as I want destroying HD's, I still have to send them out to an outside vendor that gives us a pretty piece of paper saying they have been disposed of "properly". We don't go through enough disks for the cost of paying them to outweigh the costs of buying something like this (although I think it would be fun to have one :) ). I'm sure the company we pay has something along these lines though....

nepenthe0
nepenthe0

As a comedy script writer you would earn vastly more than in IT. I laughed to tears reading your post. Thanks - I needed that... Rick/Portland, OR

jim.man
jim.man

When necessary, the US Govt uses these... SEM Model 22 HDD Hard Drive Disintegrator Comes standard with sound enclosure. Integrated controls with single push-button operation, complete safety interlocks, current sensing, automatic drive indexing, and motor control. Specially coated cutting area to reduce magnet buildup. ? Capacity: 20 drives per hour ? 12" x 9" feed opening ? Dimensions: 86"H x 53"W x 1101⁄2"D ? Weight 3,600 lbs ? 5 Blade cutting system ? Bin Base Collection Price GSA $58,771.95 ==================================== SEM 2224HDD Hard Drive Shredder This mid-range hard-drive destroyer is designed with a 20HP direct-drive electric motor that produces enough torque to destroy up to 500 hard drives per hour, of varying configurations and sizes, down to at least 1/2" x 1" irregularly shaped particles. The 2224HDD may be integrated with an SEMDisintegrator to create a dual stage system to produce smaller particle sizes. Available in high leg design for discharge into gaylord containers or with take-away conveyor. ? Dimensions: 109"H x 49"W x 41"D ? 24" x 28" feed opening ? Weight: 3,000 lbs ? Output: 400 - 1,000 lbs GSA Price: $68,754.00

saxtonmj
saxtonmj

Buy a junk car. Fill it full of your drives. Have the car crushed.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

A screwdriver is for driving screws, period. In your first example, you have mistaken it for a punch. In the second, the tool you're looking for is a chisel. Geez, what are they teaching in school these days?

jrosewicz
jrosewicz

As difficult as it is to wipe or pull out the screwdriver and destroy it, $11,500 isn't worth the convenience. I personally enjoy playing with the magnets!

TheSwabbie
TheSwabbie

Wow, how PC's do they go through a year? You'd think they were HP or Dell huh!

Mister Handy
Mister Handy

...will typically have no problem going through the top casing and platters of a hard drive. As others here have noted, a drill press works even better, and a full machine shop will have even more fun ways of destroying a drive. Here's another fun "don't-try-this-at-home" possibility: ignite some thermite on top of the drive - it should burn its way straight through!

GSG
GSG

We suggested running our drives through the MRI machine. Radiology was not amused.

phil
phil

I reduce every scrap drive to its component parts using a couple of screwdrivers. The kids love playing with the magnets (they are extremly powerful)and the platters are deep scored and are recyled steel, the case are alluminium. Cost ?0.00/$0.00, time for each drive, 5 minutes

mjd420nova
mjd420nova

This is a pretty intense degaussing coil, it has a two foot inside diameter and has been measured at over three hundred gauss in the center and being driven by AC current, does a very efficent job of completely wiping any data from any tape or platter that gets passed through the center.

Realvdude
Realvdude

HIPAA security requirements simply state using industry standards. There will be those large healthcare entities that actually had to name a compliance officer, that will worry about this, the majority of doctor office I been around are still ignorant to much security at all. At only stride I've seen is that at least most of the wifi is secured now. Personally, at the cost of this crusher, set someone down in an office to dismantle the drives, run the platters through an industrial shredder, then sell the scrap metal. If the drives are functional, there are a number of options software or hardware that do a industrial standard security erasures. The drives are then re-usable.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

There's no possible way that this device cam crush a disk better than a scrap yard will. THAT baggie full of metal scraps will pass Sarbanes or HIPAA. The need for such a policy to be put in place to begin with just shows how incompetent too many companies are these days. I think it should be like survival, if they are dumb enough to not protect their data, they deserve teh repercussions, as do any idiots who would conduct business with them. There are so many stupid protections put into place these days because people cannot accept personal responsibility, THAT's why Americans feel they no longer have freedoms. If people solved their own problems and realized that jumping off a curb into rush hour traffic may hurt, then the rest of us wouldn't need laws, signs and restrictions.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Glad you found some amusement, I don't actually make my money in IT any more though, haven't in a few years now. Oregon, have operated an office just outside of Salem, LOVE the place. I think Oregon is as close to BC as you can get in the states, love the coast, love the mountains, loved many of the people I met. Funny enough though, this is where I run off on an unrelated tanget, I was watching that wife swapping show where two families swap mothers for a week. One lady from Oregon was visiting a family with two mothers, no father. I have yet to hear a more ignorant and clueless woman, she compared being born gay with being born with a birth defect. She said she had no compassion for "slow" people and would abort a pregnancy if she knew she was to have a mentally challenged child (meanwhile the lady she was staying with had a mentally disabled sister)and just rang of redkneck ignorance. It was all pretty normal to me and then she said "In Oregon we don't haqve gay people around" I didn't realize she was from Oregon at first and was shocked as hell when she said so. I always found Oregonians to be far more aware and open minded than the rest of the USA. Guess there's one in every bunch though; Hey, I even met a stupid Canadian once, go figure!?

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

destroy HDD's, there is really only a screwdriver and hammer for this. It works well. The other suggestions were from @home Failed Shop? Nah, I never took shop. Instead, I am self-taght in the arts of destruction with power tools :DI will say however, that the dremmel tool is the most fun of the listed. And a cordless sawsall is one of the best tools ever created :D

mrainwater
mrainwater

Ground out the cheapie drill bit. Bought the diamond bit and finished 150 drives (drilled 3 holes) in less than 2 hours. Best plan for us.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

and possibly through the table holding it as well :^0 I love it!

nepenthe0
nepenthe0

1.5 Tesla magnet would send it flying, I'm not sure in which direction. The impact alone would shatter the platters... Rick/Portland, OR

w2ktechman
w2ktechman

Around my desk, I have HDD platters posted on the wall, and HDD magnets all over the metal overhead storage. Hmmm, keyring :) I just recycle the case though, and the read/write arm/heads. But I keep busting screwdrivers on notebook HDD's, every 3rd or 4rth drive seems to like breaking my tools :(

catseverywhere
catseverywhere

...the little flange screwed down holding the platters in place makes a great key ring.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

I do some SEO work for some property owners, they let us (me and friends) stay in their award winning condos each year. I don't ski anymore due to a back injury, but it is amazing in the summer up there. Lots of mountain biking, trail riding hiking etc. And a gorgeous, but small lake with beach where the local ladies tan all day. Though I am a good 3 hour drive from Whistler, it sure beats driving 3 hours south and winding up in Tacoma or Olympia, LOL! If you are ever planning a trip up again, http://www.skyhighproperties.com [b]Aspens[/b] is great for Ski-in/Ski-out but [b]Treeline[/b] is the ultimate summer stop over.

nepenthe0
nepenthe0

My wife and I visited Whistler last year, and we have never seen more magnificent scenery. Once upon a time I was a skier, and my favorite resort was Steamboat Springs, Colorado. But if I were to resume skiing (highly unlikely, at my age), I would head to Whistler every winter. Yeah, it might be a bit nippy 9 months a year, but look at the bright side - it keeps the Californians from bidding up residential real estate... Rick/Portland, OR

GSG
GSG

Yeah, IT people are nothing but intelligent big children with the knowledge to really cause some destruction.

GSG
GSG

About 10 years ago somewhere in the US there was a case of a person being killed because an oxygen tank was inadvertently left in the room, the ginormous magnet was started, and the tank became an airborne missle. You used to have to remove anything metal in the whole room. MRI's have changed since then and become more focused. I had an MRI on my shoulder and was allowed to wear my jeans complete with metal buttons and zipper. However, focusing a giant magnet directly onto a hard drive would definitely damage the machine.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

A brief search on the terms erase "hard drive" MRI velocity yielded no results indicating anyone had trying this with maglev side-effects. I was really hoping for a video of an HD going ballistic.

The Scummy One
The Scummy One

downtime and/or $$$ is a main factor to keep from doing something fun???

GSG
GSG

That is why they weren't amused. We offered to use duct tape to tape them down, but they still wouldn't let us test it. I guess it's more important to save an incredibly expensive piece of medical equipment than it is to amuse IT for an afternoon. Darn it..

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