Storage

This is the year of the network attached storage device


Network attached storage is quickly becoming a mainstream, small office, and dare I say it, consumer device. With the growing popularity of digital music and video comes a growing need for safe redundant storage. NAS devices like the SMC TigerStore are now available at a fairly affordable price and with their emphasis on simple configuration and operation, these devices are quickly becoming commonplace in small offices and homes.

The benefits of having terabytes of storage in a small breadbox-size device are overcoming user-level apprehensions about installing what was once perceived as an enterprise appliance. As you can see in the TechRepublic photo gallery, setting up and configuring the SMC TigerStore is straightforward and hassle-free. NAS devices seem destined to be a hot item this year, whether you are medium to small company or a technophile in need of storage for your digital movie collection.

About

Mark Kaelin is a CBS Interactive Senior Editor for TechRepublic. He is the host for the Microsoft Windows and Office blog, the Google in the Enterprise blog, the Five Apps blog and the Big Data Analytics blog.

6 comments
castleon
castleon

Right, I have a NAS box based on serverelements NASlite 2. ... very nice.

oscar_hendrix
oscar_hendrix

i have an old tape unit storage with 400 mb maximum of storage, maybe can i use it with this new technology? or what kind of unit i need to do it. thanks...regards...oscar

johnmckay
johnmckay

NAS is so cheap you just backup another level to an another NAS or drive. Tape is too slow, too lame, too old..... just past it's sell by date now. I can't think of any advantage in keeping tapes at all. My scsi tapes only job now, is to keep my PC off the floor, and that's only cos I hate parting with it. I haven't used my 70Gb scsi tapes in a year so logically I should bin it ASAP. One day soon I'll follow my own advice. :-)

howlingengines
howlingengines

Careful thought required on the network layout - If the NAS is on the same network as that which interconnects the computers , you may end up with the 'swimming-up-stream' sort of contention ; better to put the drive on it's own subnet via the network switch/or even a couple of 'NAS server' machines with 2nd network cards.

rich
rich

Does anyone have recommendations for backup policies? Are these things a hi-tech example of the classic "Tragedy of the Commons"?