Data Centers

vSphere 4.1 Update 1 adds customization support

VMware vSphere 4.1 Update 1 has been released. vExpert Rick Vanover notes the most significant enhancement in the update is the addition of operating system support.

VMware administrators' biggest update challenge is to make sure all operating systems are fully supported. This can be basic support, such as having a VMware Tools installation that works for the operating system in question, or something more specific, such as support for guest operating system customization.

With the release of VMware vSphere 4.1 Update 1, customization support has been added. The following operating systems now support customization on vSphere 4.1 update 1:

  • Windows 7 SP1 (x86 and x64)
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0 and 5.5 (x86 and x64)

Some database platforms have also been added as supported database destinations for vSphere 4.1 Update 1:

  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2005 SP3
  • Oracle 11g Standard and Enterprise release 2, 11.2.0.1.0+ (x86 and x64)
  • IBM DB2 9.7.2 Express C and Enterprise (x86 and x64)

For ESXi hosts, several new features are available, which include:

  • In the release notes for ESXi, trusted execution technology for select Intel processors.
  • Logical processors per host can reach 160 total for ESXi.
  • Some new drivers and an incremental increase in supported operating systems.

When an update like this becomes available, the first thing that needs to be updated is the vCenter Server. This may also be a good time to move off an older database server. And if any of the built-in vCenter certificates are getting ready to expire, this may be a good time to correct those too.

A number of fixes were rolled into vSphere 4.1 Update 1 as well, which are enumerated in the resolved issues of the release notes.

A known issue referenced in the release notes is related to user account control getting in the way of a vCenter Server that may be part of a Linked Mode configuration. It may be a good idea to disable UAC for the vCenter Server (read my tip on disabling UAC through Group Policy, including filtering).

If you have you installed vSphere 4.1 Update 1, let us know what you think of the release.

About Rick Vanover

Rick Vanover is a software strategy specialist for Veeam Software, based in Columbus, Ohio. Rick has years of IT experience and focuses on virtualization, Windows-based server administration, and system hardware.

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