Networking

Windows 2000 Server DHCP options

A client uses a local broadcast address when it first tries to contact a Windows 2000 Server DHCP server, since this is the only way to get in touch with a DHCP server without having an IP address. Here's how to avoid problems can develop when you have multiple network segments separated by routers.

A client uses a local broadcast address when it first tries to contact a Windows 2000 Server DHCP server, since this is the only way to get in touch with a DHCP server without having an IP address. Problems can develop, however, when you have multiple network segments separated by routers.

Routers typically don't pass DHCP traffic. If you have such routers and don't have a DHCP server on every segment, your DHCP clients will get the TCP/IP configuration from any DHCP server.

To prevent this from happening, you can choose from three options. The first is to install a DHCP server on every network segment. This requires a DCHP machine and additional configuration on the server. If you have several network segments, this option doesn't make sense. A second solution is to enable BOOTP/DHCP message traffic on your RFC 1542-compliant routers.

If you don't have such routers or a DHCP server on every network segment, your only option is to install DHCP Relay Agent on every network segment. DHCP Relay Agent will listen for DHCP traffic on the local network and forward these packets to a real DHCP server on another network segment.

Miss a Windows 2000 Server tip?

Check out the Windows 2000 Server archive, and catch up on previous Windows 2000 Server columns.

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