Disaster Recovery

DriveClone Pro 3.5: The Right Tool for the Job?

Frequently, IT professionals must prepare identical hard disk images for duplication and deployment to other systems. Erik Eckel evaluates how well DriveClone Pro 3.5 gets the job done.

The Job

Frequently, IT professionals must prepare identical hard disk images for duplication and deployment to other systems. Drives may need to be cloned to simplify new equipment rollout, or such drive images may be required to assist in rescuing a failed or failing hard disk.

The Tool

FarStone Technology boasts that its DriveClone Pro software creates exact copies of hard disks to enable instant recovery following system crashes. I put the software to three real world tests. In addition to cloning a failed hard disk and copying a functioning drive, I tested the software's ability to schedule and complete backup operations, too.

DriveClone Pro 3.5

FarStone's DriveClone Pro presents users with a simple interface that is easily understood and easily navigated. From the application's main menu, users can quickly access the program's three main functions: individual file backups, full computer backups and drive cloning.

DriveClone Pro boasts several advantages:

  • The software is easy to install
  • The user interface is free of distractions and easy to navigate
  • Log files do well collecting critical information
  • Support for universal restores (independent of hardware)
  • The software is powerful (it makes cloning drives and partitions as simple as selecting checkboxes for source and destination locations) and includes a separate backup option
  • The price is right ($59.99, compared to $69.99 for Norton Ghost)

DriveClone, like many utility applications, also suffers a few minor drawbacks:

  • Backup options are limited (Full/Normal and Incremental are the only options; those technicians requiring Copy or Differential backups are out of luck)
  • Users will need to possess some fundamental disk knowledge (such as knowing the difference between a partition and a disk)

The Right Tool for the Job?

DriveClone Pro software makes cloning disk drives and partitions easy. Simply navigate the cloning application's short wizard and within minutes you have functioning cloned disks ready to deploy. Better yet, FarStone's included simple Backup functionality within DriveClone Pro. Thus, IT professionals receive not only a powerful drive imaging application, but an additional option for regularly completing data backups.

Read my comprehensive screenshot review of DriveClone Pro 3.5.

About

Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments. He is also president o...

51 comments
Sporty1
Sporty1

I've had good luck with XXClone...

binghamc
binghamc

I installed the Trial Version and rebooted, then BAM..BSOD...Nothing can seem to fix the issue and I am now having to re-install windows vistas from scratch!!!! Tech support said they can not guarantee to get back to me as I do not have a registered copy! WTF???? I installed this thing as a Trial for a reason, I should not have to wait a week for a seriaous issue if they want my money!!!!!

FXEF
FXEF

There are lots of ways to clone a drive and everybody has got a favorite method. You might want to give this a try. To clone drive "hda" to drive "hdb". Boot up any Linux LiveCD, open a terminal and use this command: dd if=/dev/hda of=/dev/hdb That's it... coffee break time.

nitishramnohur
nitishramnohur

does it have support for cloning over the network, like multicasting from a server to its clients, much like Acronis does it so well ? Nitish/.

g01d4
g01d4

I've cloned for two reasons: 1) populating cluster nodes and 2) setting up machines going into environments where the disk is wiped on return. For both these instances (non-Linux) I was able to use Seagate's (free) DiscWizard .

gregzdnet
gregzdnet

I use imaging on a regular basis and drive image XML is just to slow for regular backups for me. I use about a half dozen computers for research. They are all dual boot with at least an image each partition so that is a dozen hard drive images to maintain plus usually the C: drive on DVD in case of hard drive failure so a half dozen more. Ghost 2003 is usually pretty good but limits you to 3 partitions and I usually use 4 and Ghost at least 2003 does not see some of my hard drives. Tried Ghost 10 but did not like the running processes it installed and seemed like bloat ware like most recent Symantec products. Paragon works fantastic for me it's fast a little over minute to make an image or clone and has many partitioning features as well as network imaging. I believe the use of Paragon to make partitions may have hidden the hard drive from Ghost although as far as I know it should write the MBR the same, I know third party partition utilities can write partitions that are unreadable by other partition and imaging programs but as far as I know must follow the same MBR. My drives are mostly SATA and Ghost reads some and not others so perhaps Ghost 2003 does not read some SATA HD's Paragon can be a little complex and is tough in DOS but the basic functions imaging, copying, even most partitioning and resizing functions are intuitive basic and fast. Have yet to try Acronis Or Vcom they have a 2 or 3 image and copy utilities Speaking of Farstone what ever happened to Intel system recovery tool which is Bios based as far as I know it came out on and ECS 945 board only and heard no more of it. A bios based image program would be great for someone who had only one machine and did not want to monkey with a linux, pe, or dos based copy/image program assuming it worked well. For me for now its Paragon and Ghost with Paragon getting the favor by far Seems as if Farstone may be great for simple jobs but does not have enough options can't see spending the money and then having to buy another product for more options, would far rather have comprehensive partitioning, imaging, copying, backup in one product.

trchbrr
trchbrr

Does this tool allow for SATA to PATA transfers to take place?

Softheads
Softheads

I've had good luck with (free) DriveImage XML. It allows compression and also the ability to split files CD size for burning. Quote: Easy to use and reliable program for imaging and backing up partitions and logical drives. The program allows you to: - Backup logical drives and partitions to image files - Browse these images, view and extract files - Restore these images to the same or a different drive - Copy directly from drive to drive - Schedule automatic backups with your Task Scheduler Image creation uses Microsoft's Volume Shadow Services (VSS), allowing you to create safe "hot images" even from drives currently in use.

plgc.plgc
plgc.plgc

Hey I already read thet It can CLONE the entire DRIVE, but this include the HIDE PARTITIONS like Lenovo has, for theis rescue & recovery system? If the APLICATION clone THE ETIRE (I mean the perfect copy of the hard disk nuts and screws also) I will give this TOOL 10 of 10. Best regards

TG2
TG2

DriveClone isn't a zero footprint solution though... Powerquest made Drive Copy; before it was annexed into Symantec. The last version (4.x?) could be used to clone drives by booting off a floppy, **without** ever installing a thing! (not the case for Ghost) And for Free, you can use a Knoppix cd, and use the DD program, or from another web site I was tipped off to try Digital Dolly, another "linux boot" cd that is menu driven. (google it to find it) The benefits to any of the three I've mentioned, are that you don't have to alter your drives by installing an application to make a simple clone. You don't have to build a master drive seperately from your normal boot drive.

jbeebe
jbeebe

I would have liked to see a test of the Universal Restore capability. Can the program be used effectively to upgrade to new hardware without a full system OS installation, program install, data restore?

mitzi_mitzi
mitzi_mitzi

I've compared it to the Disk Duplicator feature from BOS (www.bos.co.il) which is also free. BOS makes a beter job, even when the hard drive has a CRC error. We've been using the BOS at work for a year now and I've still not found something that surpasses it.

coxpc
coxpc

I could not believe how easy this program was to use. I got a job where a point of sale software company needed me to clone a drive in a working system for one that had started having windows issues. This was free using their 30 day test drive. They do have a paid version and I am buying it. It simply makes a copy of one drive to another drive from within windows, and it makes the new drive bootable too. Very cool product.

mitzi_mitzi
mitzi_mitzi

Allright, they were greedy, but their support might have their hands full with paying customers with the same trouble. Anyway, perhaps we'll never know who's to blame: the product...or VISTA!

Photogenic Memory
Photogenic Memory

However, doesn't that copy block errors aswell since it literally copies everything? I guess. Anyways, your method works and has saved the day on many occasion. Thanks for posting. oh , quick question? I take it you have to "fdisk -l" or "df -h" first to see if the other drive is recongized by the system before proceeding, correct?

kfoutts
kfoutts

I have found that a pci-ide controller is a very good partner with cloning software. Personally I have used Ghost although as drives get larger I'm not happy with the speed or integrity but I've yet to see anything that really works better. But using a pci-ide controller you can move a system os to a completely different system. Install controller with ide drive let windows find it ghost or clone to the pci ide drive go to another system install pci ide drive boot to cloned system ghost to whatever the built in controller is. I've used this many times, even moving a serer to different hardware, saves lots of hours

mitzi_mitzi
mitzi_mitzi

Hi, The manufacturer is also a Data Recovery company, when you want to submit a drive for DR or forensics, they just copy with this service your drive, and the resulting image contains everything that is in the disk, hidden,erased, metadata, etc. etc. They use only the image to perform the Data Recovery process, and that's perhaps why they offer the service as free.

brownl
brownl

We use the sysprep tool from Microsoft, the Knoppix CD and DD to create and push images. It's free and if you use Sysprep to prepare the image you don't have to regenerate the SID's.

mitzi_mitzi
mitzi_mitzi

Hi, because the manufacturer is also a Forensic Services provider, they created the software that can be installed in any place on a network, and actually leaves ZERO Footrprints. As I wrote to Mike, BOS enables the protection of the system by imaging in several ways: - The duplication of the disk drive or any system partition of the disk drive WHILE THE DISK IS WORKING. - Creation of an image file on a local drive, external drive or remote server - Updating of the files on an external drive by BOS, in such a way that we get, in fact, a Mirror result through a backup procedure. - Reading and copying files from a damaged hard drive, with CRC or other reading errors. - Creation of an identical, forensic copy of the original ? including also all deleted files and all the additional existing data, even if it seemingly disappeared from the HDD. This ability comes handy especially in order to transfer an active server to a data recovery facility without the need of turning the server off. - Image creation: Identical copy of every memory stick or every memory device recognized as a drive. - Ability to update any Local or Remote Image only by update of the blocks that have changed. This allows to keep a copy of a server system on a remote machine and updating it once a week or just before any OS update, to update the image according to the changes that happened in the original drive. - The image is in according to the accepted standards in the world of free systems (LINUX) and is not protected from use by other systems. This approach allows the mounting of the image as an active drive in any system : Linux, Novell, McIntosh, and?even Windows. - In case that we've mounted the image as an active drive, we'll be able to update the files in it by using the BOS software and thus getting a duplicated system drive that includes updated data. The uploaded image can be of course local or on a remote disk. - Most important of all: the Imaging service in BOS is free for use and does not require the purchase of an additional license.

CorporateLackie
CorporateLackie

Corporate Ghost V8.3 can still be used as a zero footprint solution, you just have to ferret out the executable from the mass of software that Symantec wrapped around it... That is how we do it at my shop.

EriccS
EriccS

A critical component in my IT toolbox is a 1GB flash stick loaded with a derivative of Bart'sPE (a bootable XP lite in essence) along with a slew of tools including Ghost, antivirus, various anti-spyware utilities, etc. Booting from this device, the volumes on the C drive are no longer locked thus I can Ghost them, scandisk, etc. with no interference. Also, booting from another device is useful when you suspect a virus or the boot sector has been corrupted. No, this is not a solution for end users. It still has the "limitation" of requiring knowledge of partitions vs. drives. This is MY tool for me to accomplish MY objectives, rather than something for users (even power users) to have installed on their machine.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

allowed you to boot off the install cd and run either gdisk (partiton tools like fdisk) or ghost. It would also load scsi and usb drivers if you wanted. Another good free option is G4U. It has limitations, but it is free. The syntax is easy and it images to and from images on local disks, disk to disk, disk to tftp server, or tftp to disk.

lk_bellsouth.net
lk_bellsouth.net

I do not see in the review that DriveClone has the ability to utilize image creation compression as does Ghost Corporate Version 8.0. This is useful in regard to conservation of storage target drive space in the event that the technician has the need to build multiple images for future use. Which clone application other than Ghost has this feature?

lk_bellsouth.net
lk_bellsouth.net

I do not see in the review that DriveClone has the ability to utilize image creation compression as does Ghost Corporate Version 8.0. This is useful in regard to conservation of storage target drive space in the event that the technician has the need to build multiple images for future use. Which clone application other than Ghost has this feature?

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

as this is a limitation of the OS not the backup/restore. Some OS's such as XP can recover in most situations thanks to PnP and built-in driver selection. Windows 2000 has never moved well in my experience. Linux I have had mixed luck with. What i would like to see is how well the program handles dynamic resizing of partitions to fit the physical disk space. All imaging programs can copy an image from a smaller drive to a larger drive, but very few can go from a larger drive to a smaller drive, even if the image is using less space then is available on the smaller drive, the partition information will not allow the copy.

btd
btd

Best luck I've had is with the Corp version 8 of Ghost, which comes with a 32 bit version of their "old" interface on a copy of "The Ultimate Boot CD" and an external USB 2 HD. Plug HD into base pc, boot to UBCD, pull image, shut down, plug into new pc, boot UBCD, dump image. Then start the new pc, run NewSID (awesome tool), add back to the domain (if needed) and it's done. Can also use Ghostcasting from UBCD to do multiple machines since it can enable networking. Very slick for labs, but causes a ton of network noise. So, isolate the lab or do it after hours.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

knowledge of partitions vs hard disks is a liability in an imaging software. This is not software most users need. Backup software yes. Bare metal restore yes. But this can be had in traditional back up restore environments, where partition information is irrelevant. If you are imaging a hard disk, there is usually a specific reason for the image as opposed to a standard back-up paradigm, example, to push an image out to 30 client machines that contains a set list of permissions, software, drivers, what have you. Traditionally imaging software has been the tool for power users and admins, not standard home users. edit: wrong spot for post

christer.carlsson
christer.carlsson

If a company writes, quote "The licensing cost is calculated by the total volume of data that needs to be protected. ", it can not be called free.

FXEF
FXEF

The user should make a complete back up of the system before installing trial software. Looks like the user might have to take the blame this time!

FXEF
FXEF

This method will give you an exact copy of the drive, including block errors. I would recommended to run a surface scan and repair all errors before running dd. I would also suggest to read the manual and completely understand the dd command. This can be a easy and cheap way to clone a drive, if you know what you're doing.

CorporateLackie
CorporateLackie

I'd like to see some testing on the hardware independence feature. The latest version of Ghost Solution Suite (V2.0) also advertises this feature. I'd love to be using that in an upcoming rollout but have not had time to test. It would seem that at the very least you would somehow have to be able to add in any additional drivers not found native to the OS that were also not part of the original donor box for the image.....

bellyacher
bellyacher

Eric, could you explain how to put Bart's PE on a flash stick in order to boot. and how you use it? thanks in advance!

ehanner
ehanner

Eric, Can you talk about how you installed the BartPE on the flash drive? That sounds like a great solution and I'm just now trying to get up to speed on the PE concept. Thanks, Eric H

jcoco
jcoco

I think I like your approach the best. I am Mac savvy but PC clumsy -- so would appreciate if you could detail your "killer toolbox" so I can replicate it for my use.

drbayer
drbayer

As long ago as Ghost Personal Edition 2000 I was able to boot from the CD into Symantec's GUI to clone drives. I seem to remember doing the same with even older versions, but I've slept since then. I have used G4U for a few years now, and for what it is designed to do it works very well. It uses dd like another poster mentioned using Linux for. The downside for G4U (and any straight dd solution) is partition management. You need a little extra knowledge in order to optimize partition schemes, as G4U copies the partition(s) exactly as it is. If you clone from a 20GB drive to a 10GB drive, you end up with a 20GB partition on the smaller drive, which understandably causes grief. If you clone the other direction, you end up with a small partition on the large drive. Another problem with this solution is if you want to clone just a partition and not the entire drive. G4U supports this, but NTFS partitions do not handle it well if you clone the boot partition in this manner (this is a limitation of Windows, not G4U). There are ways around all of these limitations, but it takes a bit more knowledge and/or research to compensate.

seggsyuk
seggsyuk

Acronis DriveImage allows 2 levels of compression along with 1:1 imaging. An excellent tool IMHO, simple to use.

jwimmer
jwimmer

I just checked the latest UBCD and there is NO version of Ghost on it. It comes with HDClone v 2.0, g4u, PC Inspector, XXCopy, EaseUs Disk Copy, and CopyWipe. The version of UBCD is 4.1.1, so if you know of a version that does have a better HD clone application I'd be very interested in knowing about it. Not sure where you found NewSID either.

mitzi_mitzi
mitzi_mitzi

Hi Dumphrey, You're right, this BOS is a full toolkit for the technician, in addition to a stand alone or data survivability optimizing (service-continuity) solution for the enterprise. However, the manufacturer allows free download to home users to increase the product's popularity. (Aren't we all sysadmins also home users at home?)

mitzi_mitzi
mitzi_mitzi

Hello Christer, The Disk Duplicator is one of the services included in the BOS software. The Disk Duplicator service is available disregarding the BOS license you have, meaning by this that even a home user using a free license (able to protect up to 100MB data for backup&recovery) can implement the DD service as detailed in the page http://www.bos.co.il/150085, which I here quote: "The Disk Duplicator service is a basic BOS utility that enables complete disk duplication. The main advantage of this BOS utility resides in the fact that it does not depend on the operating system installed on the original disk. It clones the entire drive to an additional disk, even if the case this additional disk has an operating system installed which won't be recognized by the computer. This utility enables the creation of corporate critical systems' clones, and to keep them as files on the BOS system, in order to bring them back to the hard drive for speedy server recovery. Even a hard drive with read errors can be duplicated by this utility. The fact means a unique advantage when compared with similar solutions, and is extremely useful in those cases in which it is needed to recover data from damaged drive. Given this utility does not check the kind of operating system on the drive, it is possible to use it even when using drives on which the operating systems are not recognized by the system. An additional advantage of the Disk Duplicator utility -coming soon- is to search and replace data while duplicating it. This ability is handy, for instance, in the creation of a number of identical workstations (with different IP addresses, however). The system will duplicate the original disk to the target disk drive or the original file to the target drive, and while doing so it will change a certain textual value to another one. The Disk Duplicator utility is available in BOS versions 2.2.16 and up."

rudy.berongoy
rudy.berongoy

Hi interested to find out if you've used WDS, just starting to deploy it, it's free as long as you have Windows server 2003...is the idsc copying software you talk about really free? is it like Ghost?

Nimmo
Nimmo

I swear by Shadow Protect this software has saved my ass a few times, its a fantastic piece for software You can mount images as file systems for quick file recovery The package doesnt copy at the file system level it copies at sector level using vss writers so its a true exact copy. The downfall being that when replacing hardware you will need to use a disk with the same sector size. (no biggy) Built in ntwork support, allows for different levels of compression. Support is awsome if you have any problems and contract StorageCraft about them, they will act on it ASAP. Great knowledge base, server and workstations editions plus more.

mitzi_mitzi
mitzi_mitzi

Good for you Mike, that you keep this old copy. Please be patient with me, let me develop this point step by step: Today, among all the imaging software products available, I must say Ghost is not the cheapest, and also not the best one. The imaging software has two main purposes: first of all to offer a fast way to backup (about 1GB a minute) in comparison with the slow and fallible tape backup. Most of the conventional imaging products can clone a PC system disk within minutes. A most convincing purpose of imaging software is that their final product allows to reverse the state of the data in the computer to some point in time before some unwanted event happened (hacking, virus infection, partial accidental deletion, etc.) Typically, backup software in big storage systems capture images of the whole disk drive once a day, and in case of a virus infection or data corruption it is possible to go back to the last healthy image. Certain malware is able to attack the system (Windows registry) and not only the data. As you know, sometimes, in case of corruption it is not only necessary to clean the virus, you also need to reinstall the entire system and this should be the last recourse. The rebuild of all the software system on a PC could take a day or two, and even more if you need to restore the preferences and all the configuration as before. For those for whom time is money, the imaging looks a good solution. But not all the imaging software were born alike. The price and easiness of use are two very important factors in the decision. Some manufacturers offer server based software that can hold an images' folder. There are products that use the Windows file system, while others create their own partition on the hard drive, which Windows cannot recognize. This is the most secure approach, but also the most complicated. Most software products keep the images in proprietory ways, so that they are recognizable only by the application that created them. This situation prevents the access to our important data in the case that some specific software or some specific software version is faulty or inaccessible. Now, I translated this from the manufacturer's magazine in Hebrew: BOS enables the protection of the system by imaging in several ways: - The duplication o f the disk drive or any system partition of the disk drive WHILE THE DISK IS WORKING. - Creation of an image file on a local drive, external drive or remote server - Updating of the files on an external drive by BOS, in such a way that we get, in fact, a Mirror result through a backup procedure. - Reading and copying files from a damaged hard drive, with CRC or other reading errors. - Creation of an identical, forensic copy of the original ? including also all deleted files and all the additional existing data, even if it seemingly disappeared from the HDD. This ability comes handy especially in order to transfer an active server to a data recovery facility without the need of turning the server off. - Image creation: Identical copy of every memory stick or every memory device recognized as a drive. - Ability to update any Local or Remote Image only by update of the blocks that have changed. This allows to keep a copy of a server system on a remote machine and updating it once a week or just before any OS update, to update the image according to the changes that happened in the original drive.

mike
mike

Amazingly I still use an old copy of gohst. the executable is dated 12/29/2001, I don't recal the version anymore, I just use it, I have been able to copy any windows OS from one drive to another as long as space permits. In some cases I boot from a floppy and in others A cd. Just seems that the good ol dos stuff works best for me. Iwill say that all I use it for is cloning though, Acronis gets the nod in other cases where I need back up to another location, or in some recent cases terribly slow ghosting even on the newest hardware. Mike

helpdeskdude
helpdeskdude

With all the knowledge here why not put it to use? Everyone chip in and let's create a free cloning\partitoning\do it all program. Then we wouldn't have anything to complain about....

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

but my needs are simple. I set up specific purpose machines and image the hard drive in case of a crash. So far I have only imaged to a larger or same size drive for work, not the other way arround, though I did work on a solution for going to a smaller disk, and it is more time consuming, but it works in testing. If I was doing more complicated imaging then this, I would probably look into a paid product, I have no idea how Ghost Enterprise is these days, but the Symantec Enterprise products tend to be much better then their home products in my experience.

mikep
mikep

The Achilles heel with Acronis True Image 11 is using the Bootable CD to recover an entire lost partition. Acronis uses a Linux Kernel and Linux USB drivers that are absolutely horrendous in restore performance. And when I say it's bad, it's bad. I'm talking maybe 10MB a minute restore rate. A backup which only took an hour or two could literally take over a DAY or more to restore. This isn't the case when you are able to boot from Windows and run Acronis from the Windows boot using Windows drivers. There it runs perfectly fine. But if you lost your hard drive due to hardware failure, you will be swearing at this product. If you want a disk imaging product for backup that can restore a complete disk from the recovery bootable CD decently, stick with Symantec Ghost 12 which uses a Windows boot with their recovery. Acronis is fully aware of this issue. After I complained, they apologized and offered me any of their other products for free. What a consolation for a product that failed to delivery on its promises.

pat
pat

Simple,inexpensive, and reliable

drbayer
drbayer

I've used Acronis True Image and Disk Director sporadically for the last few years, and have really liked what I've seen - the down side being you actually have to pay for it (I like free stuff). True Image is very effective at cloning locally from disk to disk or over the network using Windows shares, ftp, or other file servers. It supports compression and is very easy to use. Disk Director is a very robust partition manager that makes creating/deleting/resizing partitions very easy. Again, an easy interface to learn and use. One thing that I like about the Acronis products (at least the old versions that I have used) is that once installed on your machine, you can use that installation to create bootable media. I was able to easily create a single boot disk that would run either True Image or Disk Director from a boot menu (or allow you to boot from your hard drive if you simply forgot and left the boot cd in the drive).

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

has plugins for ghost 8, but you have to own a copy of ghost 8 to get access to the binary files needed. To use a non-licenced copy of ghost would be bad. As for good disk cloning, G4U is nice. Its slowly becoming my new imaging solution.

Dumphrey
Dumphrey

And I have to admit, Ghost forced me to learn about disk systems back in the day... I bought it on a whim, learned to use it, and have been a fan of disk imaging ever since. That was as a home user, not a Tech or Admin. I had no real need of imaging, but it was cool, and with XP activation, it became convenient. Now when I build a computer, I install the OS, programs etc. Activate, update, and burn an image to a bootable resore dvd. Clean and simple. The dvd gets taped to the side of the case for home users and my self. Ugly, but hard to loose, and most likely will not get scratched. Now that Ghost has become justa bloate dcopy of Windows Backup, and even laks gdisk, I am looking for new utilities. I haven't used Disk Duplicator yet, but I will be testing it out this after noon. I will let you know what I think. edit: Actually I won't be testing it. Its register-and-wait-ware, honestly I hate those.

contact-pro
contact-pro

OK, I went to the link that you gave and there as no donload option. I selected a Donload button hich took me to a questionair that wanted to kno all abot me, back to the time of Christ ! It then gave me a generic "Thank You" reply and said that someone would be in touch. hat kind of "BULL***T" is this ? ? ?

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