Enterprise Software

Mac OS X Leopard: The Right Tool for the Job?

Apple Macintosh computers have long boasted fast, secure operation and outstanding approachability. Mac OS X 10.4 (Tiger) performed admirably, but all OSes become stale in time. Is an updated OS needed to fuel today’s powerful Mac computers?

The Job

Apple Macintosh computers have long boasted fast, secure operation and outstanding approachability. Mac OS X 10.4 (Tiger) performed admirably, but all OSes become stale in time. Is an updated OS needed to fuel today's powerful Mac computers?

The Tool

Leopard

Mac OS X 10.5, known as Leopard, introduces numerous improvements to Apple's popular OS. Besides new enhancements to the Safari Web browser, Mail, Spotlight and iCalendar and important new tweaks to the Dock, Leopard introduces an almost foolproof backup utility known as Time Machine.

All told, Mac OS X Leopard boasts numerous advantages:

  • Improved Dock features and functionality
  • Foolproof backups using the Time Machine utility
  • Updated Automater, Disk Utility and iCalendar applications
  • Simplified Firewall, Sharing and Network features
  • Cover Flow views within Finder, which simplifies finding needed files

Time Machine

There's only one disadvantage I can spot:

  • My 1.5GHz PowerBook G4 now takes maybe 30 seconds longer to boot up. But that's a small price to pay for all the new features and time-saving functionality cram-packed into Leopard.

The Right Tool for the Job?

Priced at only $129, the OS upgrade is a no brainer. The Dock's time-saving features alone justify the purchase for this consultant-on-the-go. Were there ever any question, Time Machine's ability to essentially ensure complete system backups occur automatically put the issue to rest quickly.

Read my comprehensive screenshot review of Mac OS X Leopard.

About

Erik Eckel owns and operates two technology companies. As a managing partner with Louisville Geek, he works daily as an IT consultant to assist small businesses in overcoming technology challenges and maximizing IT investments. He is also president o...

85 comments
jma
jma

I've have worked as a developer on macs for more than 10 years, and have two macs at home. Upgrading them went smooth using them has been a breeze, but then again, I do not use any Adobe or Quark products. I run Office 2004 flawlessly and have not experiences any problems. I have an XP running on a desktop too, and there I see stalls, programs crashing, updates that causes the system to malfunction. But my macs run smoothly...

spkarthigeyan
spkarthigeyan

wld b much more awsome if some more clear ??

cathar.gnostic
cathar.gnostic

Hey, I upgraded last year. The only advantage I found was Time Machine, it saved my ass many a time as I work as a ICT, always modifying heaps of stuff. 10.4.11 still runs on my other unit that my partner uses. I never use the other features of 10.5.1 but I guess I will as it flows into my customer base.

jitu1088
jitu1088

CAN YOU GIVE MORE AND DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT LEOPARD? IF YOU ABLE PLEASE SEND YOUR INFORMATIONS TO MY MAIL ID(jitu1088@gmail.com).

garys
garys

I have rolled out Leopard in my Art\Graphics Department and all my users went ooooh aaaah but when the fonts stopped activating automatically, and there trusty Freehand MX started crashing, and Adobe distiller didn't want to launch and you couldn't print from certain applications, and, and, and... We started thinking that Apple could keep their Stack, Time Machine and Quick Look (ok maybe not Quick Look)and just give us an OS that ran the basics like Tiger did.

spam
spam

Hi, I've been an OSX user for many years. I do not fall into the usual Apple gimmock traps, however I use OSX for work and music because its UI is more preferable than Linux X which is totally buggy and it's OK as a backend development environment as a bonus. However Ive found OSX becoming more unstable and bloatware over the years becoming on par with microsoft releasing buggy alpha software to win the race of software releases, and the alpha testers are paid customers. OSX panther was the very last OS I found to be properly stable, I was forced to upgrade to OSX tiger to get Java 5 support. As soon I did that there was huge changes in how the apple supplied software work. Mac Mail kept crashing and couldnt keep up with my hundreds of email a day forcing me to move to thunderbird which was worse. The stickies couldnt scroll anymore so you have to select the text with a mouse that kind of thing which causes major issues down the lines because text would come with it. Apart from these issues that I was forced to ignore and workaround, I managed OK but i still found them annoying and felt robbed because I was unable to complain about these without actually paying for support to complain about the product ! I moved to OSX leopard recently in the hope that Apple release Java 6 with it because they pulled the download off their developer site, while also worrying about getting new software because of the fear of Apple's history and becoming like Microsoft and Vista. Now what is most bothersom about this article is that OSX and apple machines are suppose to be tools for professionals not bloating down the system with features none of us will ever use just so its lucrative to the home market. Therefore what has happen here is that Apple have tried to compete for the software release race similar to the space race during the cold war times and have produce the most horrible product in their history of OSX releases. Ever since the upgrade and also finding out Java 6 was not shipped with the release, i've been frustrated and painfully mucked around and has wrecked my work schedules. All apps regardless what they are crash. I've had crashes every day and regardless of my efforts to report problems in the crash reporter it's still happening and i've yet to see an update. The worst offender is Mac Mail. Apple have finally released an 'RC' version of Java 6 but it's a hack to try and repoint java to it and when i try to point to it none of the applications will work properly ie eclipse will crash. OSX Leapard is a disgrace and Apple are just as arrogant as Microsoft and Adobe to produce quality commercial bug free products and people shouldn't stand for this. You pay for a product it should work, this is a classic example of something that doesn't work and deserves to be released freely. They also should provide live realtime chat to report issues with their developers, we are professionals and don't need paid support to tell us how to use a computer rather we need to tell them of their stuffups. I'm very keen to wait for another update to fix these crashes. Or I will have to be forced to install a Linux desktop on my Macintel which I'm also grieving because there may be less crashes, but the UI is definitely still full of bugs and an unpleasant UI experience. Maybe we should just have voice control and do everything via terminal ?.

alieninvader
alieninvader

Instability issues forced me to go back to Tiger, but a multi-hundred-megabyte update was released. Apparently they fixed (reinstated) hierarchical menus from the dock, which is a major plus. But has anyone really stress-tested it, who can comment on increased stability, compatibility with MS Office, Photoshop, etc? Thank you! - Steve

techie786
techie786

Question: Can it be installed on a PC, since Apple is coming out with Intel machines

brutus
brutus

How long does it take for an OS to go stale? Tiger still works, so does Panther (except maybe with the new Ipods grrrr). $129 is not a lot, but I do not see the gain, and I do see the risk of breaking an existing application. The review reads like an advertisement.

daffoml
daffoml

Time machine is nice, but it would be great if they allowed the backups to be placed on network storage, instead of requiring a local disk.

rafaelm
rafaelm

We haven't upgraded our systems because of the issues with AD integration, which are supposed to have been fixed with the 10.5.2 update. I'm going to wait a few days before upgrading my test machine to confirm that the issues have been fixed. Despite all of the improvements in Leopard, our environment is not yet at a place where we can upgrade users without fully functional AD integration.

G...
G...

I have many different machines and I work most on Leopard. The only real problem I have is that it is missing Java 6. For my job, it is quite a plague. But the rest is really nice.

JJPEngr
JJPEngr

Thanks for the evaluation. I have a Powerbook G4 similar to yours and I have questioned the need to upgrade from OS 10.4. Sounds like it works fine even in the older Macs and provides some useful features.

robin.banerjee
robin.banerjee

I wonder if they have solved in 10.5 the problem with DVD burning in 10.4. I have an iMac with the "super dupper" burner and after a certain update which I haven't been able to locate, the burner (toast 8) insist on quitting on me systematically after an 85% or so completed (a long time I must say!) complaining about some stupid media error (wrong! I still use the same brand I used before with no trouble whatsoever) It's a pain in the neck.

b.wharton
b.wharton

This is very dangerous 'review' of OSX Leopard with its simplistic recommendation. Take the time to look at any of the forums where applications other than your bundled, user-centric software are discussed and you'll find huge issues with this latest OSX iteration. Conflicts with software such as Aperture, Final Cut Pro, XAN systems, 'required' updates of QuickTime - these are all major headaches for professional users of Mac systems. There are a great deal of great developments within Leopard, but the wise thing to have said in the review was to wait for the next (and rather obviously) BIG update which Apple are having to release in the next few months. Then, and only if you have a relatively new machine with probably 2Gb RAM, would it be worth the shift. That's ensuring all drivers for any 1st and 3rds party internal and external hardware you might have is ALSO fully solid with Leopard. Leopard mark one's ragged ends feels a lot like a Microsoft release. Worrying stuff. Ben Wharton Magic Lantern Productions

darrenb
darrenb

What goes around comes around! We're new to Macs and although there are some PC apps stranded in our tech make-over, were committed to switching all our systems. O/S at $129? Hey Billy-boy, put that in your overprices pipe and watch the smoke!

spam
spam

Hi thats ok to hear one of the features are useful. But for a pro user time machine is absolutely useless and basic. I'm much better just using rsync and cron which its possibly using. I cannot comment further as maybe there is a way to do it. But i havent found so far how to select only certain files to sync to a backup source, and at what intervals and times. It seems to only be able to backup the entire drive and at a time or exclude certain directories that suits it so you could be doing something quite intense like audio dumping and then there goes time machine running in the background. I really wish they just quit trying to come up with shit software and features and just make their OS work. I just clicked the time machine app in applications, it started warping my screen with this completely horribly useless zoom animation (vomit) and im on this fullscreen with only two selectable options an d some useless animation on the right side and no idea what to do with it, i could do something really wrong and mess it up. http://www.electroteque.org/Picture3.png I'm much better just to setup schedules and run rsync when i choose. Even rsyncx does a better backup job than this crap.

alex
alex

I have upgraded to Mac OS 10.5 Leopard and now all my printer options have been severely limited as a result. I cannot print on anything bigger than A4 and all my customized page size settings now appear grayed out and a default "other" size (measuring an odd size of 100x 36 cm) appears anytime I want to print on A3. In distiller - where I prepare PDF's I cannot customize my page size to include all the necessary registration, tick and reprduction/print related elements as the largest page size available is only A4. Is there a driver that will bring my printing settings (on all software - I might add) back to what they were when I was on 10.4.11 - the latest version of Tiger. Is this leopard changing its spots to gremlins. Help!! Alex

spam
spam

Hey read my big thread you will probably love it. I think you should be looking as far back as panther for something stable. It was ok. At least nothing crashed all the time, as soon as i went to tiger there was issues with their software that wasnt a problem in panther than never ever got fixed or updated. So apple has gone from buggy OS9 crashing photoshop all the time requiring rebooting because of memory leaks to a pretty good OS in OSX 10.3 then 10.4 broke their own apps, then 10.5 is just a disgrace to use for anything else but home use because it would affect your work completely. My mac mail suddenly removed all my email or some mailboxes and i had to get a backup from 2 weeks previous so i lost two weeks of email. That was because i had gone away in that period and obviouslly didnt have the backup disk with me. So i had to reimport the mailboxes, and then move them all around again inside mac mail. Not a simple process.

galley
galley

Unless you get a hacked version, OS X will run only on Macintosh computers. The primary purpose of OS X is to support the sale of Macintosh computers. It would defeat that purpose for Apple to let it run on other hardware.

jwinget
jwinget

Until Apple actually appears to have fixed the problem. We've had users successfully use AD by doing an upgrade rather than a clean install to 10.5 and another was able to continue to login via AD after a migration. Yes entirely in oppositon to what i suggested earlier to another. Users did these on thier own and THEN asked for help when other issues cropped up. Ignorance truely can be bliss sometimes. They aren't broke yet so i've left them alone and advised them to let me know if things stop working for them.

matherg
matherg

Our Graphics group recently upgraded to Leopard from Tiger and to our dismay, not only did AD intergration stop working, but so did their access to anything we had on Sharepoint. Turns out Leaopard apparently handles authentication a tad differently and makes it impossible to access any websies on SharePoint. We've had to roll downgrade all back to Tiger.

Guitockey
Guitockey

in 10.5.1. Our Graphics Dept. had to upgrade to Leopard and CS3 because many of their associate vendors had done so, and apparently certain apps in CS3 were not backward compatible with CS2! So they upgraded, and have since run across multiple folders created in earlier OS X versions that show no visible files. I can see and manipulate the files when I connect to the server using 10.4.9, and the Windoze Server 2003 can see the files, although there are no security permissions. This inherited permissions problem was supposed to be fixed with the 10.5.1 release, but is still occurring. I haven't bothered to upgrade my home Macs to 10.5, as I can't see any benefit at this time. Leopard has some great ideas, but it's not worth the hassle, yet. I agree with other posters, this is an awfully simplistic review.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

When is the last time you updated Toast? That is a problem that seemed to occur right after the upgrade to 10.5 and was supposedly fixed by a Toast update within days. The fact that Toast seems to be running so slowly could well be an indication that Toast needs to be updated or maybe even uninstalled and reinstalled. Also, before you go blaming Toast for the media complaint, there is at least some possibility that the drive in your machine is failing. Your description of your hardware is hardly comprehensive. Which iMac are you using and how old is it? The SuperDrive is, in most cases, a CD/DVD RW as compared to CD/DVD R drive being the Combo Drive. You should also consider your media itself. Just because it's the same brand doesn't mean it's the same quality as previous media. The color of the media side of the disk can tell a lot here. If it is clear or a very pale green, then the quality is very basic and probably only capable of slow burning. One brand in particular is notorious for defective media and I personally refuse to use store-brand media since most of it pressed by that one manufacturer. On the other hand, if the media side of the disk is blue tending towards purple, this is usually very high quality media and normally capable of burning up to the maximum speed of your drive. In essence, don't go blaming the OS for issue that may be elsewheres. Troubleshoot the problem and try to determine the real cause.

kwilliamson
kwilliamson

What do you want from someone who is paid by apple to write these articles. Looks like it was just a copied press release from apple.

rhafner
rhafner

Do you mean this update? http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=307109 The driver stuff is pretty funny, since this is an update, not a replacement, so the old drivers still worked. The first update they had was within weeks of the product going on sale, and this update is more a response to user feedback than anything else. Now, I do have one question- whats the problem these free, required updates of quicktime? If they need to update Quicktime to use those programs, chances are its because those programs are taking advantage of new code in Quicktime- you should be happy to have access to the latest in greatest. Now, to be fair, I wouldn't have updated right away if I didn't end up getting a new computer. That being said, the transition from Tiger to Leopard was incredibly smooth, and the only problem I had disappeared after a day, when Apple fixed the problem. Compare that with bugs that are still in Windows XP (let alone Vista), and there isn't much reason to compare this to a Microsoft release.

garyleroy
garyleroy

You neglect to mention just how many of those "value" $129 upgrades there have been since OSX..."Hey, Billy-boy" what? Should MS take up Apple's policy of charging a hefty price for every software patch? If that's what you think, I'm glad you switched platforms. While Apple was collecting $129 for every new gotta-have kittycat upgrade, updates were free and effective for XP. And they've kept the same policy for Vista; the $ spent for Vista upgrades will be all that's needed to be spent for years, fat chance of that happening with "Stevie-boy's" pay-for-patches system. On top of that, XP being a very stable and usable system, there's no need to spend anything at all to get what should be basic things like the ability to print properly.

gpfear
gpfear

A copy of vista runs you a little over $100 depending on the version. OSX is just as bad as Windows. Wait for the patches. XP and Tiger are still the safe choices.

robin.banerjee
robin.banerjee

Dear Vulpine: Thanks for your prompt, though not, in my view, very polite answer. Please be so kind as to not patronise others right away. I have updated my toast program very recently (I don't know the precise version by heart, but I think it is 8.1.0). Besides, I was not talking about OS 10.5; my problem started while working in 10.4. Also, Toast has always run very slow on my iMac (I believe it is G5 running an Intel core duo, a "white frame", with the 22" screen, i.e. a previous to last model), and it first worked, and then stopped doing so, regardless of the media, which of course posses a physical limit on the burning speed and reliability (my burner could be a Panasonic which has CD/DVD RW capabilities, only -R DVD I believe) but the problem I'm describing, I think, has shown up with other burners too( I'm not an IT pro as you probably are, but I'm not a dumb idiot any way). I have done some forum reading and quite a few other people have had the same problems I was describing and I was not, nor am, neither FORMALLY blaming Toast nor OS 10.4 but just asking in an INFORMAL way. Your expertise is very welcome, and I'm thankful for the enlightening media explanation you kindly posted, however your knowledge could be probably better taken advantage of if you could provide some help in a friendly mood, rather than behaving, please allow me to say so, as a personally offended defender (payed? hope not) for MAC OS and Toast software alike, which, by the way, I both consider great. Thank you again, but allow me to suggest to you the possibility of taking "a stroll" along the Linux forums, and just maybe learning something, if not technical, just about personal attitude and stile. Thank you again.

Dan
Dan

I do a fair amount of TS for Recording studios and the one thing that almost everyone ignores is that Optical drives need their Firmware updated frequently. At least twice a year and right away if you have burn problems. It makes them more compatible with newer media and sometimes makes them burn faster! Dan supermacmanhelp@gmail.com

rickdesigndad
rickdesigndad

I have 3 Macs in my home (2-Core G5 PowerMac, MacBook and MacBook Pro 17") and 3 Macs at my work (MacBook Pro 17", MacBook and 4-Core G5). All were upgraded to Leopard, save the 2-Core G5 and one of the MacBook Pros which received a clean install. All but the MacBooks are used for video editing with Final Cut Studio 2 and associated graphic workflow. I have had no problems with Leopard - no crashes on any of these machines, and other than a small Final Cut problem for a couple of days until an Pro Apps update was released, have had no software compatibility issues. Anyone suffering from repeated crashes most likely has migrated from numerous past OS upgrades, has installed incorrectly, or has a software incompatibility issue that requires attention (and blame) beyond the OS. Help can be had at apple.com/support, Apple's discussion boards, or by calling Apple for assistance. Leopard is a good product and Apple's support is first class. Don't suffer from poor performance, complain about it and blame Apple. Take steps to fix the problem and then enjoy the security and features that Leopard has to offer.

Rndmacts
Rndmacts

Quicktime is not being upgraded because of other programs, it is constantly being upgraded because of security flaws. For every Mac OS upgrade there is a Windows upgrade to close a security hole caused by the program.

drbayer
drbayer

"The first update they had was within weeks of the product going on sale, and this update is more a response to user feedback than anything else." The first update came out that quickly because of various bugs in Leopard, one of which caused users to LOSE DATA. There was more at stake here than simply placating whiny users.

evilkillerwhale
evilkillerwhale

My Vista machine has a full crash...never. Hasn't actually shut down in months due to Vista crashes. My macbook (brand new, came with a Leopard disk) crashes EVERY SINGLE DAY. Don't get me wrong... I love working with it. It's fast and powerful, but at the same time, unstable. I put Vista ultimate on it, and it hasn't crashed a single time. Parallels crashes fairly often though, as did Mac office 2004, and when I uninstalled that and got a copy of '08, it's STILL unstable. I love the mac, but at the same time, it's ridiculous to say it's anything but unstable

TexasToastToo
TexasToastToo

i think the comparison here is a bit off center. Apple has been churning out both UPGRADES and PATCHES, but at a faster pace and higher level of usefulness than Billy-boy. When was Longhorn/Vista first promised? It's been so long, i've forgotten. If you'ven been thinking that each new cat is a simple patch, you've been staring at Start menus and End Task screens for too long. Leopard is feature-rich and not a patch. As with Vista, Leopard has stability issues - though i've yet to experience them. As others are saying in the posts, stick with Tiger or XP if stability is mission-critical. For me, i prefer simple and complete. i budget the $130 annually and don't have to try and out smart the MS sales department in getting the best deal. I get the "Ultimate" version of the OS each time, but at a far cheaper price point. And, if the improvements aren't enticing enough, i wait without fear of having the OS support dropped in a few months. Keep in mind that all the cats are playing nice (at least the last 3 are still supported). When is MS threatening to cut the strings on XP? February/March? Why? 'cause their "patch" hemorrhages and IT staff don't have enough aspirin in stock to cover the headache deployment would cause! i won't deny that leopard (and the MS Office 2008 i added) have issues. i've yet to experience them with the OS, but others have. Office 2008 is full of anomalies! I do think that if you are going to compare the two OS's, the definitions need to match. Otherwise, Vista is nothing more than a patch. i'm not trying to be snippy. i just think the comparison is, well, with Apples and oranges.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Post got repeated twice by a network hiccup.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Post got repeated twice by some sort of network glitch.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

The version of Windows Vista at $99 is "Windows Vista Home Basic," an essentially stripped-down version that gives very little control to the user. On the other hand, at $129 you get all versions of OS X 10.5, equivalent to Vista Business Ultimate which is priced around $399 or better. OS X is different, yes. But in my personal opinion, as yet there is nothing as bad as Windows. The only version of Windows that really showed any stability and reliability is XP, a version I still use when I absolutely have to run Windows.

evilkillerwhale
evilkillerwhale

when Vista came out, there was a thing so you got Vista Premium, NIS 2007 (3 licenses), OneCare, a printer, two tax software things, and office for 80 dollars after rebate. It was like 450 to get everything. Half off of that for instant rebate, half again for mail in. I've never seen Apple do that. Microsoft basically gave it to customers. I got a full version of Vista ultimate for just beta testing Office 2007 Beta. You can't say MS doesn't have good prices.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

I admit that my response sounded rude, and I apologize. I have read too many bloggers and responders who choose to blame Apple for everything that goes wrong in their machine, whether it's hardware or software. The original tone of your complaint came across to me as being of this type, and I was wrong. I can tell you that Toast is up to version 8.0.3 and it may fix some of your issues. However, I expect that most of the latest Toast update is designed to make it run better in Leopard. One question I might have about your particular problem would be to ask if you can monitor how much CPU is being used by Toast and other applications. I have personally noticed that similar applications (not necessarily disk-burning related) can draw a lot of processor power and slow things down. I could also suggest doing as a previous reply stated and see if you can install a new set of drivers for your burner. I will assume for the moment that you know how to get the burner data out of System Profiler. I had the same basic drive in my Mac Mini (now being used as a DVR) and I've noticed that there seems to be a memory leak in some of the software I'm using. A test for this might be to get everything prepared for burning a new disk and then reboot your iMac before Toasting the disk. If the burn seems to run faster, you may have discovered a clue to the problem. Without actually looking into your system, I wouldn't be able to tell you anything beyond that.

Dan
Dan

Go to http://forum.rpc1.org/portal.php all the info and downloads are there. I keep a really dinky PC around with an added firewire port and an old firewire case for this purpose. Wiebtech also make an adapter or you can use a long ribbon cable out the back of the PC. Attach the optical drive. Download the firmware and run the execute file. If your drive is external just bring it to a fiend who has a pc. Regretably, the firmware is all set up for installing using PC's. I do it with with a windows xp vaio thats 6 years old and I got it at a garage sale for $20 bucks. Sometimes apple is good enough to provide firmware upgrades for their OEM drives but only in rare really bad situations. Dan Supermacman.com

robin.banerjee
robin.banerjee

Thanks very much for you reply and help. You're very right! I have totally obviated that fact since I did ignore it until you pointed it out. Could you kindly provide some brief assistance in as to how to do so? Is it just a matter of downloading some software from the brand's web page (like flashing ROM's, say)? Thanks in advance.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

The people that were losing data were the ones trying to use Leopard like Windows. That particular type of loss was because the users were Moving data between drives rather than copying... and copying in a Mac is a simple drag- and-drop... no right-click needed. I'm not saying there weren't bugs; but the one you seem to like the most would have only affected those who didn't understand OS X in the first place.

alaniane
alaniane

DOS kernel with ME. XP is built on there NT kernel. However, I doubt Microsoft is going to build on Linux or Unix kernel for one simple reason: it's not in their best interests. Building on Linux/Unix kernel would make it easier for their chief PC OS competitor and that's Linux.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

My statement said absolutely nothing about the supposed superiority/inferiority of Mac OS X. My discussion was about Windows 7 likely being on a core of Linux. A) Microsoft specifically stated that Windows 7 was going to be based on all-new code; in other words, they're scrapping their old DOS-based kernel. B) Microsoft bought into Novell, who happens to own and market SuSe Linux. C) Apple proved that running on a UNIX core made the OS much faster than Windows on exactly equal machines. Deduction) Windows 7 is likely to be written onto a Linux core for speed and reliability. None of this has anything to say about the difference between the PPC chips and Intel processors. I will reiterate my earlier statement that Apple moved to Intel because they had to, not because they wanted to. Motorola chose to stop design work on advanced PPC chips at the 1.5 to 1.8Ghz range despite its competitors pushing 2-, 3- and even 4-Ghz processors. Apple had no choice but to find an alternate and standardized processor.

garyleroy
garyleroy

Mine's better/bigger/faster/smarter than yours, nyahh nyahh... 'Yaaawwwnnnn.....' Funny how in this platform there is such a high percentage of users who aren't secure enough with their choice to just be happy with using it; they have to continually reassure themselves of how superior it is. I guess when there's a choice, and most people choose the other one, leaving you in a small minority, there must be a bit of insecurity, or else why bother? Windows (or pardon me, windoze) users are just overweight propellor-beanie dorks, just like the ads show, right? There should be no need to gloat, they won't understand anyway, they're too busy trying to install Vista like a bunch of sheep (oh, whoops, sorry). Meanwhile, Macs slowly and, with much effort to not be noticed, convert bit by bit to the very things they've maligned...Intel chips (what happened to 'Wintel", don't hear that much now), USB2, etc. Even the blue screen that they've gloated about for years has made it's persistent presence known with Leopard, and I haven't seen one on a Windows machine for years.

alaniane
alaniane

It's not about whether it would make the system more stable or whether it would be a better OS if they used BSD (which is Unix not Linux). It's about whether it would be in Microsoft's interest to build on top of the Unix core. Windows was designed for Intel 80x86 chips, so Microsoft would not gain anything by using a BSD core over their own core. Also, by using a BSD core it would make it easier to migrate Windows apps over to a Linux OS which is not in Microsoft's business interests. Linux is a competitor platform so making Windows apps easily transitionable to Linux would go counter to Microsoft's interests. The only way Microsoft would use Unix/Linux core in Windows 7 is if the Linux OS became the predominant player in the OS market and that is not going to happen anytime soon.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Apple did not Open Source OS X. True, it is on a BSD core, and not for the reason you stated. OS X was put on a BSD core because it is a far more stable kernel than OS 7, 8 or 9 operated under. Microsoft can do exactly the same thing Apple did with BSD... put the Windows GUI on top of the Linux core in exactly the same manner that Apple put Aqua on top of the BSD core. OS X is not Open Source and neither would Windows on Linux be Open Source. OS X proved that the GUI could run several times faster on a PPC chip than Windows could run on an Intel chip of the same clock speed. Motorola chose not to continue improving the PPC chip, so Apple was forced, 5 years after OS X, to move to the Intel chip, where it is still proving to be marginally faster than Windows on otherwise equal processors. That is, marginally faster than XP... Vista has proven to be slower than XP even on machines rated as Vista-ready.

alaniane
alaniane

for one simple reason, Microsoft is not going to open source Windows. Second, Windows gains little by using a Linux core and Linux, a competitor, gains a great deal if Windows uses a Linux core. The reason OS X used a BSD core was to help it be compatible with an Intel chip. Windows is made specifically for Intel chips.

jinaeve
jinaeve

After floundering around for several months with CrossOver from CodeWeavers, I decided to take the plunge to a VM package. I did some research on Parallels and Fusion and found many people preferring Fusion. Rather than experiment with Parallels, I decided to just try Fusion - WOW, this is absolutely the best VM I've ever used. I had bought the Microsoft VM package several years ago but that just locked up my PowerBook at the time. VMware's Fusion on my MacBook Pro is smokin'! Aside from the growing gap between Mac users in corporations that are Microsoft, I've had no issue what so ever with Leopard. I was experiencing issues with Mail and iCal but largely because of the way I had set up my accounts which were "Exchange" based IMAP accounts that took forever to synchronize with the Exchange server and because the new features with Mail having "Notes" and "To Do" folders replicating on Exchange, iCal was hamstrung too. I recently remedied this by changing all my mail accounts to POP/SMTP and the problems went away. Hence my reasoning for stating that the gap between Microsoft corporate environments and Mac users is growing and not coming together. The one gripe I do have is that Microsoft insists on not adhering to industry standards and creating their own (proprietary) industry standards. This is evident in the way Exchange functions and if you drill down under the hood, you see little things such as NetBios and LANMan lurking around. Fundamentally, this is where Mac and Windows part, Mac did a complete overhaul with OSX when they adopted the Linux core. Windows on the other hand simply continued to build bloat-ware on top of bloat-ware, never really fixing the core which is why there are 100:1 Windows security patches to OSX patches. Just my personal views...

kenn.villegas
kenn.villegas

Crashing daily is not even close to how it is supposed to happen and I am sorry that you get that. But based on your job role I would assume that you could \ would be able to fix that. If not then try this: make a new account and log into that account. If there is something wrong with the unit itself it *should* happen in both accounts. If it doesn't then you know that your profile is the cause of the crash. Also I was having a strange issue on my tower that I could not replicate or trace it turned out to be bad ram. Lastly the system console is a great source of information about the status of the Mac. Since you have not said that you have tried ANY of this then it makes it hard to call it a credible issue. I do agree that vista and to some extent XP is really stable but without trouble shooting it just looks like you are trawling (trolling -being a troll) in shallow water

speeder-net
speeder-net

I am utterly dismayed by the problems you and others are reporting with Leopard and to promote Vista ahead of Leopard is shocking. My MacBook came with Tiger and was upgraded at no cost to Leopard shortly after I purchased it by Apple and I have seen little to no difference between the the OS's. Leopard is perhaps slightly slower on boot and shutdown but I cannot say I have had a single crash and use my system 8-10 hours a day. I grudgingly put XP on another partition and it works well, but to suggest Vista as a better OS is nauseating, I have seen nothing but problems and poor performance with Vista, even on new machines right out of the box. Perhaps your daily crashes are related to the apps you have installed but I don't think the blame can squarely be placed on Leopard.

jwinget
jwinget

There are bound to be a few people, just like with any product, who have horrid experiences. Seriously, as other have mentioned, backup reformat and reload clean. Don't migrate any apps or data, copy only the data you need. Install the Apps from known media only after making sure you have any update/upgrades needed. Yes it will take longer than migrating but also avoids any problem, relic programs, coming over with thier baggage and making things act poorly or try to break the systems new rules of operation. In areas around here I've had to, recently, stop people from using IE on the Mac. They just kept migrating it along, just because it was there.

galley
galley

You have something very funky going on with that MacBook. I've had Leopard running on my MacBook since soon after it was introduced. I've rarely had any trouble with it, sometimes not rebooting for weeks (and then usually because some update or install required it). I installed the OS X 10.5.2 update last night, and it went smooth as silk.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

That statement doesn't say very much. Just what kind of crashes are you getting? Secondly, almost nobody recommends upgrading to Office 08 simply because it breaks so many of the old document standards. Fine, you replaced 04 with 08... obviously that wasn't your original problem. You just added to whatever was causing your first issue. I personally refuse to even consider Vista until I absolutely have to have it; and even though I have VMWare Fusion and not Parallels, I'm running XP Pro for the few things that are Windows-specific (like my GPS software.) I personally am not having any notable stability issues in Leopard, but I find that people who are used to doing things the Windows way are having all kinds of problems simply because things are done differently and they are trying to force Leopard to act like Windows. Very possibly you are causing the so-called crashes yourself, since with even a kernel panic the machine itself rarely becomes totally unusable. I fear for those Windows users when Windows 7 is released on a linux core.

nappy_d
nappy_d

Runs 10x better than parallels

mail.dave
mail.dave

C'mon. Many people have had *nightmares* with Vista. It doesn't take much searching to find it. I use both Windows and Mac OS X. I prefer OS X because I have to repair both OS'en and Windows is just ugly by comparison when things go wrong. I don't know why Vista is more stable on your machine. I did a wipe and clean install of 10.5 (migrating my data back), and it crashes basically never. IE: a couple odd things that were gone with the 10.5.1 update.

TexasToastToo
TexasToastToo

i agree that the Mac "camp" needs to ratchet down the us vs. them mentality (though the commercials are hilarious!!). What i've observed is the passion getting in the way of the objectivity. Wasn't this very point the initial people wrote against this "review" of Leopard?! I see it on both sides: passion overrides objectivity. What makes the Mac folks seem worse (and probably are), is that for years, we - i'm being honest - have fought for survival...for years. Visionary Steve returns, strikes the right notes at the right time and the company turns from scoffed and scorned to be included across industries with car manufacturers, music producers, Walmart deities, and movie studios. What makes the windows camp even worse is that very few have ever spent considerable time (enough to adjust for familiarity comforts) in front of an Apple. Their critique stems from ignorance and the Tortoise & the Hare mentality - MS has gotten too big for its own good. If both groups could be truly objective, we could compare apples and oranges. Yes, OS's have their flaws. People make them. And yes, MS has had to deal with 3rd party apps & hardware from day one. Though, so have the open source camps, and therefore Leopard. not being a programming, i couldn't even begin to delve into how components and OS's interrelate. Being an IT for a Windows world, i spend more time fixing my office windows then my mac. i've installed all the OS's - some easily. some not. (and don't buy into everything you read in a blog...especially about re-installing annually.) you are right in that people just need to choose the OS they like and deal with it. The bashing isn't necessary - especially if it's taken personally. Each OS has it's +/- It all depends on which issues you want to deal with more. For the sake of this thread, the issue at hand is that not enough is said about the negative or cautionary points for upgrading to Leopard. Apple's marketing department is certainly scoring big. The area Apple will want to watch is the number of people who switch back to Windows. IF that number increases, Apple's got problems. If.

Vulpinemac
Vulpinemac

Microsoft Office 2007/2008 does something that Microsoft has been trying to force into becoming an ISO Standard. In order to try to force people to upgrade to '07, the new Office breaks the old .doc standard, preventing older versions from viewing documents created in '07 and quite often (by several blogs I have read) breaks older version documents into illegibility in the new version, potentially corrupting any documentation you may need to continue using and effectively losing all your older Word and Excel files. Someone commented that they got some kind of deal to upgrade to Vista, Office '07 and other things for a total of $450 and essentially getting Vista free out of the process. All they're doing is forcing others to upgrade to read that one user's new documents.

garyleroy
garyleroy

For the sake of argument, we could swap the same old tired stories of what's better, but in reality I think people should use what they like and let others alone to make that same choice without ridicule. You'll note that here, and in any Apple support group, there are constant refs to comparisons to any current MS product, as though they have to keep proving their loyalty/superiority or whatever else they imagine. I had to laugh at this thread http://discussions.apple.com/thread.jspa?threadID=1195031&tstart=15 (which will take some time to load due to the tremendous number of problems) after seeing the TV ads of the dorky PC guy saying it would take him all day to prep and install Vista (bs, by the way) and the cool Mac guy acting as though he can't even imagine that...and now, look at reality..what's the 'cool Mac guy' doing now? 8^) Of course, they will blame third parties, but what has MS had to contend with all along, with software AND hardware. And that support thread is for an OS with less than 10% of the computers using the platform! So, both sides are vulnerable, and you might think twice before making silly Billy-boy references. Hopefully the Windows folks won't be whipping up a commercial showing the now-uncool Mac guy depicted as a glassy-eyed Mooney who's been up all night, hiding behind closed shades trying to get rid of his blue screen (WHAT?!?!?) and hoping nobody finds out what it's REALLY like...anything to keep up the facade. Now I read you're supposed to reinstall Leopard once a year to keep it running good? I haven't had to do that to a PC since Windows 95. Really though, I don't think either one is rotten...use what you like, but bashing the other guy doesn't make your choice any better.

Rndmacts
Rndmacts

It seems everyone here is ignoring one major thing here including the reviewer. An independant security company blew away Apples contention of it being the most secure OS out there by demonstrating that it has more holes than swiss cheese. Time machine is not new and all the real reviews have said it is expensive to implement and flawed at best. Many serious reviews have stated that Leopard is one Apple upgrade to miss and stay with Tiger if you want to insure your computer's security.

Capt. Karl C. Helo Agathon (BSG-2003)
Capt. Karl C. Helo Agathon (BSG-2003)

"You can't say MS doesn't have good prices." ACTUALLY, I can, as can anyone who's ever bothered to look. Most people only see the home user OS prices, but look at the prices of M$ Server OS's and their "CAL's", it's fracking rediculous. One thing M$ does do well though, is that they're great with the promos and stuff like that. Not that it matters though, 'cos they give you promotional software that you have to go and replace the bloody computer to use, or force "Required" updates onto you that require hardware updates to be able to run...

daffoml
daffoml

It's $129 for a license, or $199 for a 'home' license, 5 copies you can put on all your Macs in a home environment, so you can update your iMac, Macbook, and your Mini. The MS deals are few and far between. That is my biggest gripe is the complexity of their licensing. Apple servers don't have CALs, the biggest draw for me right now. I imagine that Apple will remedy this soon, unfortunaely.

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