Enterprise Software

Five US states with highest and lowest IT salaries

Want to earn top dollar for your IT skills? A move to one of these states may help, but beware their high cost of living.

Last week, I posted a list of the top five technical certifications by salary as reported by TechRepublic and Global Knowledge's 2010 IT Skills and Salary Report. As expected, there was a lot of debate in the article's discussion thread about the relationship between certification and salary. Some felt the numbers where higher than IT pros were likely to find in the real world.

This may indeed be true for some individuals. But, remember that many factors contribute to one's pay, such as:

  • Skills and experience
  • Tenure with an organization
  • Industry in which you work
  • Education and certification
  • Geography

Despite the rise of telecommuting, physical geography still plays a large role in an IT professionals earning potential. Survey respondents working in states along the East and West coasts of the United States reported higher average salaries than those working in the South or Midwest. According to the report, the average salary of respondents "ranges from $77,200 in the Midwest to over $86,400 in the Northeast."

Top 5 States by Average IT Salary

The difference between the highest and lowest average salaries by state is even more striking. As the chart on the right shows, IT professionals in Washington, D.C. reported an average salary of $100,600 dollars compared to $56,400 in Montana, which had the lowest average salary. One word of caution before you pack up and move to one of the states with higher salaries. Remember that these states often have a higher cost of living than those with lower salaries. The National Association of Realtors reported that the 2009 median price for a single-family home in the Washington D.C. area was $308,700 compared to $139,200 in Sioux Falls, SD.

About the 2010 IT Skills and Salary Report:

For the third year in a row, Global Knowledge and TechRepublic partnered to create and distribute a comprehensive IT salary survey. From October 19 to November 15, 2009, over 19,529 IT professionals from around the globe (over 17,800 were from the U.S. and Canada) answered questions about their overall job satisfaction, base salary, benefits, bonuses, certifications and more. In March, we released the result of this survey in our 2010 IT Skills and Salary Report.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

73 comments
shasca
shasca

That be where I'm from. Lowpayville

AV .
AV .

I'd say its more like $86,000. Keep in mind that everything is very expensive in NJ. We pay the highest property taxes in the nation and car insurance is equally high. AV

B3_Nick
B3_Nick

Most of the high-paying states are NOT Right-To-Work; Most of the low paying states ARE Right-To-Work (for less).

brian
brian

Could high-security government datacenters be influencing things? I imagine Washington D.C. has a lot of government I.T. going on. Wages and cost of living don't always go hand in hand. San Francisco is pretty bad. Also you might pay extra in proportion to your increased wages, but chances are your living arrangements are not what they would be in a cheaper neighborhood.

j.baig
j.baig

Well Salary depends on a lot of other variables. Two important ones include your negotiation skills and the economy. If you got caught looking for a job when the economy is making a downturn, then companies will most likely try to lock you in a recession price. Another thing beside cost of living that kind a even out the difference are taxes. Places, like Washington DC, Virginia, Jersey have insane sales and property taxes. Also most of them have both State and City income taxes. So if you compare all that, 70k down south is hell of a salary.

cliff
cliff

$100K in DC vs. 56K in Montana. I wonder which one has the most government jobs.

lafatlife
lafatlife

I think you need to take into consideration the areas that they work in. I live in CT but work in a small town school district. I only make $37,000 per year. And yes I have state taxes and property taxes and etc. My take home is pitiful because small town can't support education on property taxes alone. I live and work in the same town.

qop46qop
qop46qop

I live in northern Maryland & work in the Baltimore area. I make a decent salary for my area and for the type of work and level of responsibility I have. Houses in my neighborhood (neither shabby nor extravagant) are going for 400K-450K. We pay federal, state, & county income tax, plus assorted property & other taxes. I bring home only about half what I "make". My husband does not currently have a job at all. I have friends & people I went to school with who live & work in the DC metro area. They make considerably more $$ than I do, but they also get up at 4 am to fight traffic to get to work. They pay significantly higher taxes than I do, and pay significantly higher costs for gas, insurance, food, etc. Other friends have moved way outside of the DC area & have a 3-hour commute each way. No thanks. I used to work in DC but I chose to take the lower salary available further north in exchange for a shorter commute, somewhat lower prices, and a chance to see something other than concrete once in a while. PS. I am one of the 19000 sources who bothered to fill out the survey when asked.

Michael Jay
Michael Jay

makes the pay almost equal, you give and you take. Perhaps the quality of living in each area makes a very big difference as well.

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

I'm in DC and have worked in Northern VA, DC and Maryland - and these number are suspicious at best. Even those of us with clearances don't pull that much cash. Where does TR pull these number from? The National Institute of Fluff? Stop the circular references and post sources.

Gh0stMaker
Gh0stMaker

86k is equal to 39k in southern MI.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

...the "right to work" states are not the ones going down the economic tubes these days? Having a union job isn't much fun if there are not any to be had.

jdriggers
jdriggers

I live in a Right to Work state. There are other factors that I do not like about that, but it keeps the blood sucking unions out. I feel much better about my income after reading this article, but feel terrible for the situation some of you are in. I'm fortunate to make a real nice salery, and when the company does well, the bonus are substantial! As for COL, could be better.I think we start taxing our taxes next year. I have lived in CO and Cal. and it's much cheaper here than Cal. CO balances out to about the same as SC. Either one is a beautiful place to live and enjoy life. I enjoy visiting DC, but you will not see living there. I prefer to keep more distance from corruption! Speaking loosely about congress. As they say, it's a tough job, but someone needs to know how to do it better. :-) As for QOL, it's about as good as it could be.

NexS
NexS

Even considering the low net salary (and higher taxes), do you consider your community a humble and pleasant community to be in? The price of living is lower as well? Or is it a situation where the balance just isn't there?

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

I live right over the MD/PA border and I do the insane 50 plus mile commute everyday each way and I can tell you that it is tough but it's worth it. But when you have a family you make tough choices. There are days when the miles get to me then I read about the average person being laid off for an average of 6 months before they find work and I feel better about my commute. Thank the lord for ESPN Radio.

Sabithea
Sabithea

I liked that this article mentioned the cost of living differences between areas. I worked for a company in Albuquerque, NM making 55 a year. I was offered a promotion which would have required me to move to San Francisco, CA. The offered income was 82 a year. I turned down the promotion because the cost of living difference would have made the relocation and pay increase a backward step financially for me, which would have affected our quality of life. So this is an important factor when looking at what seems to be a higher paying job in a different location.

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

Sure, you might be making $90k in California, but in the Bay Area, you'll be dropping at least $2k/month for a 1000 sq ft apartment in a meh neighborhood. Not to mention the price of fuel, insurance, and taxes. $90k/year sounds like a lot, but if you factor in cost of living, I'm sure it is pretty much average for anywhere else in the nation.

Brainstorms
Brainstorms

I agree -- these numbers are largely meaningless (to compare outside their metro areas) unless you accompany them with the corresponding costs of living. I've lived in the Beltway, I'm in CA, I've lived in the midwest. You can't make sense out of these numbers without knowing how much of those salaries gets eaten up by COL. And not only is the Beltway VERY expensive to live in, it's a DISASTER of congestion. But that's Quality of Life -- a different factor to consider... I'm staying in SoCal!

Angel_Tech
Angel_Tech

I live in CO and Im making way less that what it shows in the graph for Montana.. too sad for an IT guy who handles around 400 pcs.. oh well.. at least Im helping people :) Cheers ps. new resolution, look for a possible job in Montana :)

maclovin
maclovin

...what I was going to say.

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

I work in the Baltimore\Washington Corridor and all of these jobs come from government spending. This makes me personally nervous because I start to wonder if we are testing the notion that the U.S. Government will always have money. I hate to say it but I could see a point where the Federal Government will have no choice but to scale back it's spending and MD/DC/VA will not be at the top of the list.

TerryOdom
TerryOdom

I worked in DC for almost 4 years before relocating back to Atlanta last year and there is definitely a difference in pay. My last job at the Pentagon paid nearly $90K. I was only doing tier 2 help desk support. Now granted our clients were high level cabinet members, it is without a doubt possible to make that kind of money. I have a TS/SCI with a CI poly and don't even use the poly. The TS clearance and about 6 to 8 solid years of experience will get you at least $85K in my opinion. If you have a job in the DC area that deploys to Iraq/Afghanistan then the pay is even better. Once you deploy overseas in a job like the one I had most of your money is tax free plus all the allowances and per diem would easily have you clearing almost $300K. With the cost of housing out there you have to make this kind of money or more. My current position in Atlanta pays $55K. The job requires us to deploy overseas. If I go for 6 months I'll clear $100k and if I go for a year I'll clear $200K. If a clearance in Atlanta can pay that well then it's pretty obvious what goes on in the DC area. If you aren't making good money with a clearance then you're doing something wrong!!!

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

Did you take the time to download the report and read the survey methodology? If not, here it is: The Global Knowledge/TechRepublic 2010 Salary Survey was conducted online from October 19?November 15, 2009. More than one-half million survey invitations were e-mailed to recipients from the databases of Global Knowledge, TechRepublic, and other companies. Links, including the survey invitation, also were provided in online newsletters. The 2010 IT Salary and Skills Survey yielded more repondents than any other salary survey in the industry, with 19,529 people responding. Over 17,800 (92%) were from the United States and Canada. This online survey was powered by Global Market Insite, Inc. and tabulated using SPSS.

Slider7
Slider7

The report doesn't surprise me at all. I work out here in Wyoming as an IT Specialist and what they posted for the average don't EVEN comes close to what I am getting paid and I work for State Government. The cost of living out here isn't all that high but when you add in all the incidentals it's barely enough.

LawrenceFine
LawrenceFine

I work in Herndon and I think the figures are pretty much in line, especially at my company. Also, much easier to find a $300K house these days than a couple years ago:) Sounds like you are angry your are below the average.....

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Go back and read the last paragraph again. It was a survey. There's a link. If you want harder data, try the USDOL. http://www.dol.gov/

AV .
AV .

That seems pretty low to be an average salary. AV

lafatlife
lafatlife

The balance is just not there. My town consists of about 8000 people and we are laying off teachers. I have had to take pay freezes for 3 of the 6 years I have worked here. My taxes keep going up but my salary is not. I have a 768 square foot home and it now costs me 1 paycheck for the mortgage and I only get 2 checks a month. It is a good small town but the state and federal governments are not supporting education hardly at all. That is so sad considering these kids are our future!!

bdskp
bdskp

That's exactly right. It's not just about your salary for a year. You also have to factor cost of living, like housing price, insurance, gas, food, taxes, etc. All of those can fluctuate quite a bit as you move from region to region.

mafergus
mafergus

Everyone's point of reference depending on where they work and the type of work they do! I have seen companies in my area that range from $100,000 + to others doing similar work and only paying in the $20,000 (or less) range. Maybe it's just me, but I never presume that because I see prices in my area, that that means I have a feel for prices in other areas. There are too many factors involved!

edcuervo
edcuervo

I work in the same area in one of these companies with only one customer: US government. Those numbers are real. Most of the workforce is composed by former military or civilians with clearance. Also is real that the cost of living is high and the traffic is horrible. I live in northern VA and my commute is 32 mi. one way!

Gh0stMaker
Gh0stMaker

True post.. very few industries are growing in technical job growth except Gov jobs. Tech professionals in Gov jobs should count their blessing because most other industries are falling fast. It would be nice to get some salary feedback from technical recruiters that place pro's with salaries...

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

The beltway isn't that good. From Tysons to DC to Columbia to Shady Grove - it's difficult finding a quality company that actually pays (or can come close to) those "salaries" listed. There are too many resume farm operations doing the advertising.

JohnMcGrew
JohnMcGrew

It was no surprise that 3 of the top 5 were beltway-centric. I think we've long passed having the notion that the US Government will always have money, because they haven't for some time. The notion they are testing now is that it just doesn't matter. And the consequences are not going to be pretty.

The DOBC
The DOBC

Most state governments pay way below industry averages... They claim that their pensions and benefits make up the difference, but I never found it.

Gh0stMaker
Gh0stMaker

I think it's clear that people lie through there teeth on salary surveys. For example: I have spoken with recruiters in areas like Indianapolis, IN where CCIE jobs have dropped 15k since 2008. MCSE position have dropped $10k at least in middle America. Maybe a survey for professionals that took positions since 2007 would be far more accurate of a picture.

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

Government statistics aren't exactly known for their accuracy.

Gh0stMaker
Gh0stMaker

Between NJ & Lower MI - actually median income in the county I live in IS below 40k (ya no kidding)

NexS
NexS

I can't really speak for what's happening in the US because all I really hear are the more interesting things that make their way to our news stations. But I suppose the government has got a lot of work to do to rectify many of the issues in the US systems, which in the long term, would be a great outcome, but I am with you all the way when you say that the children are our future. There needs to be a balance. [/rant]

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Got me hungry. Going down to breakfast now.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

Yard work can be a PIA. As much as I like my vegetable gardening, I dislike mowing the lawn and etc. But its a chore that has to be done, so when it comes time, I just jump in an get it done and over. The vegetable garden is different, to me. There is a sense of satisfaction I get from tending to and watching those plants grow. Not to mention, I get to enjoy the fruits of my labor. Gets a trifle nippy where I live and the growing season is not as long as further south. i.e. We're experiencing warm days these days, with highs up into the low 50's. But the ground is still frozen if you dig down more than an inch or so. So to get things started early, I've already planted seeds in little trays. And placed those on the glassed in (roof and walls) patio I have attached to the house. Works just like having a greenhouse. And already I have visions in my head of salads made of items fresh plucked from the garden. Or chopped/sliced and made into a nice stir fry. And of tomatoes just plucked from the vine, simply sliced and eaten as is. Folks who don't know anything except tomatoes from a store, haven't a clue what a really good tomato tastes like. And I am originally from a more southern area (born in Oklahoma, lived there and in Texas and Louisiana until I joined the service) so I do have some particular tastes for certain things. So I grow a variety of greens; and things like black eye peas, purple hulls, snap beans, etc. There is nothing quite like fresh, really fresh. And there is the other thing, which my daughter mentioned just yesterday. She's a native Minnesotan. Back when she was a young teen, she came into the kitchen one day when I was cooking myself (and a buddy who is also from southern areas) a little something. I was frying vegetables, freshly picked from the garden only minutes before. Fried green tomatoes, fried okra, fried zucchini squash, etc. Corn meal breading, of course. Now she'd seen me do this before, briefly. Just in passing, never before interested. Her mother, my wife, doesn't make such, and doesn't care to eat such. (a native Minnesotan) So its something I do only occasionally, just in small amounts for myself, or for myself and my buddy if he's over visiting. This time, however, she stopped, watched, sniffed. And then said, "Dad, is that stuff any good? You're the only person I ever saw or heard of making vegetables like that." So I talked her into trying a bit. That was a mistake, maybe. Has caused me a lot more work since. Now she insists I call her when I'm going to make fried green tomatoes, etc. And she comes running when I do. That's what she was doing yesterday, wondering how long it'd be until I was making some. (Folks around here just seem to not know how to properly deep fry stuff so it doesn't get oil soaked inside. They just don't know how to control the temperature of the oil right.) Now, I've enough land to do it, and do raise some sweet corn. But most folks who do like sweet corn, have never tasted REAL sweet corn at its best. What's on the shelf at a store is not it. Until you've tasted sweet corn that's not more than a few hours off the stalk, you don't know what you're missing. Slurp ... Drool ... I've gotta stop thinking about this subject. I popped into this site this morning, just to see what's new. But I really need to get back to debugging a problem program which needs to be finalized today. But now all I can think about is fresh corn, collard greens, mustard greens, turnip greens, varieties of snap and string beans, cabbages, broccoli, bell peppers, hot peppers, fresh carrots and green onions pulled right from the ground, tomatoes, squashes (most any kind), peas, cukes, radishes, etc. Fresh, as is. In salads. Lightly steamed. Stir fried, but still crisp. Fresh vegetable soup. Fried. Fresh salsa, made from scratch with veggies fresh plucked from the garden. Etc. Darn it ! Gotta get the mind focused back on work. Hmmm. Just bought a cow and had it slaughtered and processed. As a result I've got a nice beef tongue in the freezer. I think I'm gonna go to the store within the next couple days and while store bought isn't as good it'll have to do for now, and buy some fresh collard greens or whatever is available, and some sort of fresh string beans or pea pods. Beef tongue, lightly cooked fresh greens, and fresh string beans/peas, with some corn bread on the side. Invite my buddy over. Doesn't get much better than that. Its time he and I, and my wife who also enjoys fishing, start checking over our tackle and gear anyway and getting it ready. Maybe we'll have time to check over the fishing boats (I have two, parked outside). Got the ride around power mower prepped last weekend, along with the weed whackers, tiller, etc. And checked over the birdhouses and feeders. I have several on the property. So that's all ready to go. Ohhhh ... I've got a bad case of spring fever. I wanna get outside and do something. Even mowing, tree trimming, and such sounds good right now.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

It's pretty much subjective. You won't catch me considering living in any of the 25 largest metro areas in the States (with the possible exception of Portland, OR), but I don't have a problem with almost anywhere else. And even then, I'd be living on the outskirts of the suburbs. Much as I hate yardwork, I like having a little bit of green around me.

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

One should be cautious about lending too much credence or importance to things like the salary survey that started this thread. Especially if one is considering a move. First off, the source of the data is suspect. If I understand the article correctly, they're relying upon the answers of individuals who responded to the survey? Without any means of verifying the numbers presented? Not to mention other factors not presented in the article. Such as level of "other compensation", such as number of paid days off (holidays, sick days, vacation time, etc), health care benefits, retirement/401 plans, etc, etc. It's like a fellow I know. He used to work for the same company I do. But decided to go the route of an independent contractor. His idea. He still works for us, but as a contractor. His paycheck is bigger than mine. But out of it he's gotta cover his own health care expenses; insurance; do the extra paperwork to figure out his own payments into the IRS (federal and state),SS, etc. He has no defined "paid days off". There are no defined "comp time" rules in his contract. Etc. Net result, he works a lot of hours for that bigger paycheck. And has to pay out large chunks of it. Not that he's complaining. He says he probably doesn't get to actually keep any more money than I do in the end. And says he probably works more hours than I do. But he likes the freedom his contract gives him to pursue the type of projects he likes best. Anyway ... Secondly, comparing salaries across such disparate geographical areas is easily misleading and confusing. In my lifetime, I've lived and worked in a lot of places around the U.S. Large metro, suburban, semi-rural, and rural areas. In Virginia, South Carolina, Florida, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Illinois, Wisconsin, Washington State, and California (north and south). Have spent time, weeks to months, in many others. Simply looking at raw salary data doesn't tell one much. It doesn't address things like COL (Cost of Living), QOL (Quality of Living), what the job market is like in one area as versus another, etc. I've always had an interest in such subjects. Having experienced such issues first hand. For instance, I spent a 23 year career in the Navy. At the end of it I was stationed in Minnesota as a Chief Recruiter. I was, and am, married to a Minnesota gal, but am not originally from here myself. It was time to decide where to live and work in my next career. So I commenced job hunting. A nationwide search. Seeing as how, at the time, unemployment was sky high. (the 1991 time frame) So I was not leaving any stone unturned, as it were. Keeping my options wide open. In any event, I ended up getting a lot of offers, from a lot of places. One was from an outfit in San Francisco. Well, I'd lived in the Bay area for several years. So was familiar with it. Truth to tell, I like the area ... as a tourist. It's my favorite zoo. One can find more strange, wacky, and weird varieties of the two legged human critter there than anywhere else. But its not in my top 10 of places I'd actually WANT to live in. They quoted an offer, I thought about it for about 2 seconds, and declined. The raw dollar amount sounded good at first blush. Was roughly twice the average annual income per worker in Minnesota. But things remembered flashed through my mind. Not only was the price of the average home FAR higher in that area (more than twice as expensive at the time), but that average home in the bay area pretty much sucked in comparison to the average in Minnesota. Far smaller, tiny little yards, on tiny streets, in crowded neighborhoods, etc. I still remember previously living there and having to find a place to live that was way out in the burbs, 45 miles from work, because I could not afford the places that were closer. If I left home at 4:45 a.m., took about 45 minutes to get to where I worked. If I left at 5:00 a.m., it took from 1 hr 45 minutes to 2 and a half hours. So I'd leave early, get there early (5:30), and sit around having coffee, wasting time, until the work day actually began (7:30). Commute back home took seemingly forever. Add, I and my family like things like hunting, fishing, camping, etc. I'd lived in the Bay area. One could do those things there, but you paid out the nose for it in comparison to the costs of such activities in Minnesota. And the available places for such activities there were always far more crowded than here. We also wanted land, enough to suit us. Big yard for the kids and our dogs. Room for a good sized vegetable garden. MY idea of a good sized vegetable garden. My current one is larger than many of the home plots in the Bay area. Room for some fruit trees, large shade trees, etc. Currently, and for the past almost 20 years, my house is on a 6 acre plot. The land itself cost me less than the average, tiny house plot in the bay area. This is not to even mention issues like higher crime levels in that area, the fact that Minnesota schools are consistently ranked as better, etc, etc and so forth. So COL, is just one factor. I was also considering QOL issues. Which are subjective. Depends on one's wants and needs and views. But for me, in the area of QOL, Minnesota clearly won out. Okay, it does get a trifle nippy here in the winter. No big deal. Have snow mobile, can ride. Even go ice fishing from time to time. But the spring time makes it worth while. My gardens grow like crazy. And we spend nearly every weekend May through September (plus vacation time, etc) at our lake place (affordable) fishing, boating, relaxing, etc. AND its NOT crowded. There are thousands and thousands of lakes in Minnesota. Our lake place is not on one of the "tourists" lakes. Lots and lots of room to pursue your interests without bothering other folks. Or being bothered by them. Plenty of fish to catch. Of course, there is also the hunting seasons. And game is plentiful, as are places to hunt. And so forth. Back then, I also got generous offers from various outfits back on the NE coast. Turned them down for much the same reasons. Raw dollar amounts might sound good. But they're not always what they might seem to be. Myself, I prefer checking Salary.com as they offer more options for comparison making. I just checked a couple test samples at: http://swz.salary.com/costoflivingwizard/layoutscripts/coll_start.asp The site indicates that when considering a move to San Francisco, for instance, I should expect that the COL is about 82.7% higher than where I now live, but that on average companies there pay only 29% better than here. In short, on average you can expect to have less extra money floating around in one's pocket. Sure, you MIGHT be offered an especially attractive deal, from one company, that'd put you dollars ahead in the end. But what if you lose that job? Likely you'll end up back at the average, meaning you're back at less disposable income than back here. I also checked Washington D.C. I've visited there a few times. Never lived there, except in a hotel. However, a few months back I got an unsolicited offer from a firm there. (They evidently know some of the same folks I do, and those folks recommended me. Don't know why, as I'm not looking to make a move anywhere or to change jobs.) I turned down the offer out of hand, without even thinking about it. The isn't anything about that area I miss or wanted to experience. But I just checked and the Salary.com site suggests I could expect the COL in D.C. to be 65.7% higher, and the average pay to be only 13.7% higher. So that figure those guys floated by me with their offer, doesn't sound all that good. It would have covered that COL differential, but I'd have to live back there. And to get me to want to do that ... they'd better be willing to double the offer ... at least. Gad ... live in the D.C. area? I'd as soon be poked with sharp sticks. Come to think of it ... They'd have to at least triple the offer for me to even think about it. LOL ... Nope. Quoting raw dollar amounts is really a bad way to judge whether one is better off working somewhere else.

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

Say something like: DC, New York, Atlanta, Dallas, Chicago, Denver, Phoenix, San Francisco, and provide the average and mean based on those areas as well as the COL. Sure it's a fair amount of work, but it'll provide a better idea of what is going on.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Which cost of living is the reference? Who chooses? Which calculator do they use? I can see possibly providing links to COL calculators, but not doing the work themselves. That's a lot of work, anyway. The COL page at bankrate.com lists 308 metro areas. etu

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

That Sounds About Right. I think all of these polls should come with salaries adjusted for the cost of living. $52k sounds far more reasonable than $90k, but you have to have the people who make "extra" so that others feel they are getting shafted.

FrankABB
FrankABB

I am a staff augmentation contract recruiter located in the DC area. A consultant (CISSP, CCNA, VMWare virtualization, Java/.net developers) will make $45 per hour minimum with salaries that can rise to $90 or $120 per hour. Employees at the top of that range could skew the average salary to look artificically high. I agree with edcuervo, COL, commute and housing are higher than average as well.

tracy.walters
tracy.walters

...there are motorcycle helmut laws and onerous firearms restrictions. I wanted to move there once, but no more.

NexS
NexS

Come join me as a country folk! Just built a 3 bedroom house for under 300k AUD. Long LONG way to commute to the US though!

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Friends tell me Warrenton or Fredericksburg in VA or Frederick in MD are probably as close as you can get to DC proper and still buy for under 300k.

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

I do agree that $18K is a insanely low (I ended getting a job making $ 30K and was thrilled) but you can buy the biggest house in the little town I lived in for $200K so it all relative.

SHARON.MARANO
SHARON.MARANO

What I want to know is where to find a single family home in the DC area for 300 grand!

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

No offence, but I was getting $10/hr (so close to your Miss. number) plus all the overtime I could be conscience back in 1990 in Redmond. The numbers are near double the reality. TS/SCI/FSP developers go for around $60K.

TheProfessorDan
TheProfessorDan

I lived in Hattiesburg Mississippi for a year and was once offered and IT job making $18K, and for a second, I considered it. The salaries in this article probably aren't 100% accurate but they aren't total crap.

tracy.walters
tracy.walters

...for server/networking staff. Entry level (I define entry level as having the required training but no experience) folks are quite a bit less ($25K less), higher end techs are more ($25K-$50K) depending on certs and skills. Execs are more than that.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Pay stubs? Of course, they could be forged or altered...

rellis1949
rellis1949

Please keep in mind that the salary is the purported average from the respondents of the survey. If the average is represented by the "arithmetic mean", then a high salary can sway the results and if only a few responses came from DC with a non-representative high salary for a small subset of the DC respondents, the average from DC would be skewed. The best representation for the salaries would probably have been the "median". The median would have reflected the midpoint salary for all the responses; both the regional and aggregate levels.

NexS
NexS

If the lies persist... see your doctor!

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

Everyone is familiar with the concept of salary fluffing whether it's to bring people on board or to paint a better picture. It's nothing new.

Kam Guerra
Kam Guerra

as any other "credible source" to date.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

You strongly implied the data was fabricated ("Nation Institute of Fluff"?). Sounds fairly wild to me.

NexS
NexS

But now that I understand... That's a VERY wild claim. Why complain about a poll or a government census? If you're not happy with the results forge them or as NickNielsen said and go and run your own survey. I mean I'm not in the US, so i don't know what living pricing and conditions are like, so I couldn't comment of how wild of a claim it is to say that DC Info tech people are earning 100k+ a year... Kinda makes me wanna shift over there really... Maybe it's all an immigration ploy...

Michael Jay
Michael Jay

Just some folks make more than you, don't cry.

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