Smartphones

Google Nexus One: Very promising but perhaps not "super"

Google hopes the Nexus One will open a new category of mobile device--the "superphone". Bill Detwiler offers his take. What do you think?

Credit: Google

As Google wound down its Nexus One press conference on Tuesday, the reviews began to hit the Web. Watching the live blog coverage of the press conference and reading the reviews, I see a lot to like about the new Nexus One. I'm just not sure it's a"superphone" as a Google presenter described the device during the press event.

Positives include:

  • Voice support for all text fields. You can now dictate your Tweets, Facebook Updates, and emails. I've been using Android 2.0 on the Motorola Droid for several weeks, and I really like the Voice Search feature. I'm glad to see that Android 2.1 will expand voice recognition to all text fields.
  • Solid technical specifications. Google's Web portal provides a complete list of the Nexus One's technical specifications, but I am particularly impressed by the 3.7-inch (diagonal) AMOLED touchscreen (800 x 480 resolution), Qualcomm QSD 8250 1 GHz processor, expandable memory (using Micro SD Cards), and its thin, lightweight design.
  • 3D capability for soon-to-be-released Google Earth. Although the Nexus One doesn't have Google Earth (yet), the OS and hardware provide a 3D framework that will be used to offer the mapping application in the future.
  • Available with our without service. You can buy the Nexus One directly from Google without a carrier contract for $529. If you purchase the phone with a 2-year, T-Mobile contract, the prices is $179. Verizon (in the U.S.) and Vodafone (in Europe) will get the Nexus One in Spring 2010, although pricing hasn't been released.

Despite all the positives, the Nexus One isn't without limitations, for example:

  • Limited internal storage. Although the Android OS and the Nexus One will eventually let you store applications on the Micro SD card (expandable to 32 GB), the current device only stores apps on the internal memory. There are conflicting reports of how much space is available for storing applications--Walt Mossberg reports that 192 MB are available, while Ross Miller indicates the number is 512 MB. (Both reviews are linked to below.)
  • Number of apps. According to some, the Android Market has around 18,000 apps, compared to the more than 100,000 apps for Apple's iPhone. As more Android devices enter the market and developers get a feel for the hardware that will standard on these devices, this will likely change. But for now, Apple still rules when it comes to mobile apps.
  • No multitouch support in the Android UI. Although there is information that Android 2.0/2.1 and both the Motorola Droid and Nexus One can support multi-touch input, Google has not included multitouch gestures (such as pinch-to-zoom) in the Android UI. This is likely a decision based more on legalities than pure functionality. Apple has applied for several pattens involving multitouch and in April 2009, Elan Microelectronics sued Apple for infringing on two patents related to touchscreen and multitouch technology. Hopefully, the patent issues will be resolved, and we'll see multitouch gestures in the Android UI soon.

Overall, the Nexus One appears to be a solid mobile device with a lot of promise. I'm just not sure it lives up to the "superphone" moniker.

Here are links to several Nexus One reviews:

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

12 comments
jmariani
jmariani

Right?

Lovs2look
Lovs2look

But do android (phones) dream of electric sheep???

saghaulor
saghaulor

Have the Google phones seen attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion?

nickprevett
nickprevett

No Tethering either.

Jordon
Jordon

Do you mean no support for tethering or no tethering?

A_LeMalle
A_LeMalle

It feels like Google is positioning this phone to be a longer lasting hardware platform than most of the, already released Android phones. More processor horsepower, a screen that will handle apps that don't yet exist, memory slot (soon to store apps, hopefully). Google had to be careful to release a phone that is "good enough" but not a Droid killer. They still need the verizon subscriber base.

peter.demasi
peter.demasi

Bill missed an important issue, the unit does not support the ATT 3G network. So this really is a T-Mobile device. 'The currently available Nexus One device is unlocked and will recognize SIM cards from any mobile service provider using the GSM standard, but is incompatible with the frequency band used by the AT&T and Rogers networks for 3G data (see below). Additionally, the Nexus One is incompatible with CDMA networks such as Verizon and Sprint.' http://www.google.com/support/android/bin/answer.py?answer=166507

TexasJetter
TexasJetter

I really like the looks of the Nexus One, and would consider getting one, but if it cannot support 3G on ATT it is out for me. Going back to Edge would have me pulling what little hair I have left out. . . . I know other disagree and don't like ATT, but where I am it works the best.

wdewey@cityofsalem.net
wdewey@cityofsalem.net

The article said that the only phone currently available was the T-Mobile edition. There phones available for other carriers coming out in the spring. Bill

swilsonw
swilsonw

Thanks for a balance review. I am reading a pile of posts and articles that discuss whether this is an iphone killer. And the impression is that many want the iphone killed and many want the iphone to stomp the android. What a waste of text. Why do we wish for a super dominant platform/company and then turn around and try and squash them when they achieve what we wished. I hope android succeeds and the iphone as well, I use a windows mobile. Diversity breeds challenge and change. There is room for everybody, if only we the people would stop pushing for one to dominate.

Jordon
Jordon

It's the Windows vs. Mac vs. Linux thing transferred to cell phones. The debate will never go away.

jeb.hoge
jeb.hoge

I like the Android platform and the form factor of the Nexus One and HTC Hero/Droid Eris. I also am on Verizon and like that VZW has really embraced Android. What bugs me is when reviewers use the number of apps as a metric for the phone itself. I'm sorry, but nothing about smartphones annoys me more, because having a dozen different apps designed to make fart sounds or individual apps that play sound clips from movies is not utility, nor is downloading an app that exists solely to market one retailer or product. 100,000 apps is as meaningless a metric as a million Twitter followers.

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