Security

HP CEO Mark Hurd doesn't fully trust the public cloud: Should you?

HP CEO Mark Hurd has said HP won't put anything material outside its firewall. Do Hurd's remarks give you more or less confidence in cloud computing?

At the Gartner Symposium in Orlando, Fla., HP CEO Mark Hurd talked about how the company plans to layer cloud services on its infrastructure in the future. However, with more than 1,000 hacks a day, security creates an important need on differentiating what they put in public versus private clouds. "We wouldn't put anything material in nature outside the firewall," Hurd said.

During his remarks, Hurd seemed to imply that HP would be willing to use cloud infrastructure within its firewall, but wouldn't think of putting sensitive data (such as email or financial systems) in an external cloud. Is it just me, or do Hurd's remarks seem contrary to HP's marketing of its Cloud Assure solution?

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

10 comments
Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

and access issues, hell, over half the area around where I live has only slow dial up Internet access, not the best for working those sort of apps.

nelson.ingersoll
nelson.ingersoll

The entire concept of "cloud computing" is a come-on designed to generate income. To separate fools and their money. It fails the common sense rule of self-preservation completely.

pgattocpa
pgattocpa

First, the "Cloud Assure" link in the last paragraph is broken. [Edit: link fixed - thanks Bill.] Second, and this is more of a question, do SaaS cloud providers put their own data in the cloud? E.g., does Salesforce.com have all of their info in a public cloud or in a private network? If only on a private network or cloud, then you need to have a beef with the other Mark (Benioff) as well. Finally, I see no hypocrisy in selling a service that the seller may not use themself. (Assuming, of course, that everything is on the up and up.) Each business has to determine their own level of comfort with respect to security and the damage to their business if the security is broken. HP's level of discomfort may be too high while another company may have gone through a cost-benefit analysis and determined that the cloud works for them. Why should that disqualify HP from offering a service that others want?

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

At the Gartner Symposium in Orlando, Fla., HP CEO Mark Hurd talked about how the company plans to layer cloud services on its infrastructure in the future. However, with more than 1,000 hacks a day, security creates an important need on differentiating what they put in public versus private clouds. ?We wouldn?t put anything material in nature outside the firewall,? Hurd said. Original post: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=1139 Do trust current security measures enough to place "material information" in a cloud outside your firewall? Take the poll above and let me know.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

Sorry for the broken link. It now works. I do however, think vendors should eat their own dog food whenever possible. Sure, a company that develops medical coding software isn't likely to use that product as it's designed for a specialized customer. But, how much confidence would people have in Office if they suddenly learned that Microsoft had been using OpenOffice for the past 10 years?

wahnula
wahnula

...and want total control over our data, which at this time can't be guaranteed by the cloud, it's still too "new" to be trustworthy. I would have a hard time trusting my company's financials to anywhere outside my control.

M.Schreiber
M.Schreiber

The cloud may be a great concept for some things (like software applications) but I would never store pertinent information outside of my control.

jmgarvin
jmgarvin

Which is how it should be. If we didn't eat, breath, and uh...breath some more our own products we'd be hypocritical. On the flip side it makes sense to use our products (ITIL, discovery, deployment, CRM kung fu). If we created something specialized I can't see using it. Anyway to the point of the article: Trusting your data to the cloud is iffy at best. Who knows what's going to happen to it. Is SaaS a good model for smaller companies, sure...is SaaS a good model for the enterprise, gods no.

pgattocpa
pgattocpa

Bill: To continue your analogy, if the market wants to buy dog food with low quality meat and I can supply dog food with low quality meat and make money, why should I have to feed my dog low quality dog food? ( I hate this analogy, so let's drop it!) What I am trying to espouse is a supply and demand scenario. The market may demand X (public cloud) and I can supply X (public cloud) and make a profit. I may prefer Y (private cloud). Why should I ignore the market (that is not sell X (by not providing a public cloud solution)) merely because they want X and I want Y? I would never put my information out there. Therefore, by logical extension, I couldn't start a company that provided a public cloud solution. And to be even more perverse, even if the company I started did use the public cloud and could sell (by your standards) a public cloud solution, morally speaking (after all you are talking morals) I couldn't run the company I started because I believe the risks out-weigh the benefits for me personally. I just can't get there. (Although I'm still open to reading other thoughts. I'm not perfect.)