Enterprise Software

Poll: Has your company cut back on printing?

Companies and consumers have cut back on printers and supplies, hurting the bottom line at HP's printing and imaging division. Have you cut back?

ZDNet Senior Editor Sam Diaz shares his views on the recent news that Hewlett-Packard's printing and imaging reported a 20 percent decline in the third quarter of 2009. He says companies such as Facebook are cutting into HP's printer business with online photo-sharing tools.

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Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

15 comments
NickNielsen
NickNielsen

since I can remember. We use an on-line tech resource site and Sharepoint :-& to distribute documentation, personnel information, etc., etc. Even our pay and travel systems are on line: ADP :-& :-& :-& The client, on the other hand, runs pharmacies. Although they have changed their system so the printing costs are less, they cannot reduce the amount of printing without violating one or more federal/state regulations. edit: corrected

Osiyo53
Osiyo53

Yes we have cut back. Both due to an effort to save some cash, and because in the current economy our work load has decreased. Are we planning to go "paperless"? As some have mentioned here that they will be doing. Nope. In many cases there are simply no suitable, adequate alternatives to paper and printing.

BlazNT2
BlazNT2

The only thing I print these days is payroll checks. Im to small for cheep enough direct deposit service. I PDF everything and e-mail to my customers. Billing goes so much faster. I have went from over and hour billing to under 20 min. That is my money savings. I also pay all my bills on line except if they charge for the service. If they cant find a way to do it for free then I will walk or drive(never just to pay a bill, I have to be going close to them first) and pay for free. My time is money and I just get more things done when Im not using the convention way.

john3347
john3347

Ink has always seemed MUCH more expensive than necessary for the producer to make a reasonable profit on it, but has gone absolutely out of reason the last 2 or 3 years. The "cash cows" NEED some dieting. The consumer (both individual and corporate) needs a break. On another related note: I find it contradictory that utility companies, credit card companies, etc. so strongly promote electronic billing in their literature, yet require you to jump through hoops to enroll and maintain electronic billing. If you give them an email address, electronic billing should be default.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

A friend mentioned I could pay the county property taxes on my car by using the county's web site. Sure I could, for $1 plus an additional 2% of the tax bill. According to the web site, this fee was to defer the cost of offering the online payment service. First, I'm d@mned if I'm paying an additional fee for the privilege of paying my taxes. Second, if it costs more to process the online payment than to process a paper check, then they've implemented something incorrectly. Third, what's a percentage of the transaction have to do with anything? It costs them (and the credit and debit processing agencies) the same to process the transaction whether it's for 2 cents or two hundred thousand dollars. I sent my payment using a paper check in an envelope via USPS. It cost me less than fifty cents, as opposed to the $3.50 it would have cost on line.

NotSoChiGuy
NotSoChiGuy

The $1 fee alone seems exorbitant, but I've seen it on other sites (USPS used to charge $1 to forward mail online). However, if you were close to being late, and faced getting dinged with those fees, I could see the justification in paying. But 2% of the bill? That's over-the-top idiocy. Sufficed to say, I look forward to similar fees being enacted in the Chicago/C(r)ook county area soon. The local political motto: there isn't a tax we didn't like, enact or raise!

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

We eliminated all but a dozen desktop / personal printers several years ago with leased multi-function devices. This was driven almost entirely by the cost of toner cartridges. When the current contract is up in a couple of months, we're going to cut the number from 15 to 8. This one is being pushed as a cost cutting measure. Many managers are screaming it will cost more in productivity to walk back and forth to the remaining printers, especially in those areas where there is heavily clerical activity.

ivorjosephson
ivorjosephson

we have also changed to compatible ink with no reduction in quality.

emmet.jones
emmet.jones

Overall I think that printing, personal and business is down in North America. Asia, Europe, and Latin America may still see some upside, but that was never for personal use; only for business printing. People, at work or at home, are learning better and cheaper ways to communicate. There will always be a baseline of printing need in business but printing is discretionary spending. Just my thoughts here.

bdougherty
bdougherty

I work for a large engineering firm. Printing/plotting is mandated by the clients we work for, which in most cases are state DOT's. Some of these clients are switching to TIFF and PDF submissions, but the vast majority still require paper/vellum/film to be submitted.

IT_ShortBus
IT_ShortBus

We moved 90% of our printing to the cheaper Canon high end copiers we have which also allows them to forward a print job as a PDF so no paper or toner is used and print to a few HP laserjets that are on an old AS400 system. All managers will loss there printers when they run out of toner. We're a billing company and I see no way we will ever go paperless any time soon.

ramonabeth
ramonabeth

About a year ago, our company made a formal decision to go paperless. Or at least get as close as we could within reason. Our decision was a "green" choice not a financial one. Sorry to hear about HP's profits, but if they are as green a company as they say, they'll look for other ways to make money.

jck
jck

They'll sell more kinds of hardware and price up toner.

zentao
zentao

Yes, we have. We use e-alternatives and PDF almost everything. The only time this isn't possible is when dealing with certain local and state governments which still insist on communication via paper forms.

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