Security

Poll: Which e-mail security and privacy faux pas is the most dangerous?

Many people, even IT pros, still ignore the basics of email security. In a recent IT Dojo video, Bill Detwiler goes over five basic e-mail safety tips that everyone should follow. Of the five he mentions, which are you most concerned with?

Many people, even IT pros, still ignore the basics of email security. In a recent IT Dojo video, I go over five basic e-mail safety tips that everyone should follow. And in his article, "10 essential e-mail security measures," Chad Perrin outlines another five. Of the five I mention in the video, which are you most concerned with?

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

9 comments
melekali
melekali

There a very little need to follow a hyperlink from an e-mail. Either one ought to follow a saved favorite or type it in. This is the most difficult lesson for users to learn, in my experience.

TtFH
TtFH

I'm jumping on the anti clicky bandwagon too, but I'll also throw in an opening all attachments. From what I see, these actions seem to be the easiest ways to open your computer, and all it contains, to the bad guys. Tony F

alex
alex

It's a tie, opening attachment killervirus.doc.exe and clicking on that hyperlink to yourbank.SortaSoundsLikeItsDomain.com

decoburn
decoburn

Placing a distribution list in the TO: slot allows everyone that receives the email to know the addresses of everyone else...and this includes anyone to whom your email might be forwarded. Better to place it in the BCC slot so no one else can see the addresses. Nothing has to be placed in the TO: slot, but you can put in your own address if you like.

TomMerritt
TomMerritt

For the most part, the bad guys propogate their attacks by getting the user to click on something. Why spend time and energy attempting to hack into a system when it's almost ridiculously easy to have a user invite you in? I have a page on my website entitled "If I wanted to destroy you, you would now be destroyed". I can send a user an email with an apparent link to my site, that redirects to this page. It's an effective lesson.

cY1aN1d3
cY1aN1d3

Tomm just hit the nail right on the head. But it will amaze you how ignorant users are on these things..Just get very good security applications running on your PC so it can at least warn you.. Btton line..LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP!!!

Dave Pusey
Dave Pusey

Clicking links without checking where they go to.

drew
drew

your email

drew
drew

that came out wrong should have been up a level

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