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Poll: Which of the following IT mistakes have you committed?

Every admin has at least one embarrassing story about something they did to hose their own network. If you're in a confessing mood, tell us whether you've committed one of these mistakes or another major IT goof.

In the following IT Dojo video, I discuss dumb mistakes IT pros make that can mess up their networks.

Original blog post: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/itdojo/?p=221

These are only a few of the most common dumb things net admins can do to mess up a network. If you're in a confessing mood, tell us whether you've committed one of these mistakes or another major IT goof.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

10 comments
duncanleaper
duncanleaper

Wasnt so much as a mistake....more like dumb ass! Was "messing" about with our firewall one day, i didnt realsie it at the time but i deleted one of the SMTP forwarders to our EDGE server. So next day, i have people screaming at me "why am i not getting any emails?" So, checked exchange, edge, phoned our service provider and even phoned the company who deals with our spam filter So finally after 6 hours it suddenly dawned on me that i had been messing about with the firewall So i fixed the problem, by this time though everyone else buggered off home I dont touch the firewall anymore

dogknees
dogknees

While working on clearing out old backup logs at a remote site, I ran a cull instead. Everything on C: disappeared with the exception of the swap file and a dozen or so files in the Windows directory. The best bit was that the server kept running with no obvious impact on the users. They were able to save their work and logout.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Foolishly selecting Yes on an Are you sure without being sure. Discovering you have no backup. Unsucessfully hiding your big mistake behind a smaller pile of BS. :p Problems come in threes....

Datacommguy
Datacommguy

Interesting. But the question was "Which of the following mistakes" and it only allowed me to pick one. No, I managed to skip some, but there was still more than one appropriate choice.

SkunkFunk
SkunkFunk

When I did it, I did it all the way in one shot. It was about 7 years ago and I was brand new to network administration. The network that I had accidentally inherited was running a clustered W2K server. The retail software ran in a browser and used SQL Server. I had to install a cert server, so i went about it. When the Add/Remove Windows Components box popped up I found and selected the certificate services. Then I thought, "hey i don't want to reinstall all these other services, I should uncheck them".. so I did. I uninstalled every single network service we had including IIS, DNS, DHCP, and Microsoft Cluster Services .. everything. Needless to say the certificate server installation failed since IIS had been removed. Everything was down. Everything! I was able to get everything except Cluster Services running again which required an all-night telephone call to Microsoft Support. I would say "Doh!" but yeah, that just doesn't even begin to cover it.

jsaubert
jsaubert

What, there's no "All of the Above"? Failing to make new tech-notes, keeping logs of changes and tracking out assets seem to be the big ones.

adam.hooper
adam.hooper

Where is the 'All the above' selection? LOL

dustinh
dustinh

Ok, so I was about three months into my new job. Knew all about Active Directory, but never implemented it in this large of an company. With only one domain, I was implementing a "lock-down" policy network wide. Nothing was updating even if I set the refresh period to only 10 minutes. So, I applied it to the TLD and said I'll let it propegate overnight. Came in the next morning, all the users were screaming that they couldn't access anything. No problem, I say, I'll get it taken care of. Unfortunately, because I applied it to the TLD, it even locked down the administrator accounts. No problem, I say, I'll go to the server room, log in locally there and access it that way. Because I applied it to the TLD, it also applied it to all servers as well as PCs. Well, I'm a little screwed now. 3 months in, locked down the complete network and no one, including the IT department can do anything to fix it. On the 19th server (literally) that I logged in to, for some reason it hadn't updated. It was still wide open. I immediately ripped down the GPO and started anew..10 minutes before my boss walked through the door..

DaBigTrain
DaBigTrain

All of the above, and others! For starters, "failing to track assets" and "not keeping spare equipment on hand"

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