Hardware

Poll: Will most people eventually use an LCD TV as their computer monitor?

In a recent Product Spotlight article, Bill Detwiler outlined his experience using the Sharp AQUOS LC-32D64U LCD TV as a computer monitor. He feels many people will eventually use LCD TVs as their primary computer monitor. Do you agree? Take this quick poll and let us know.

The line between computer monitors and televisions is growing increasingly thin. In a recent Product Spotlight article, I outlined my experience using the Sharp AQUOS LC-32D64U LCD TV as a computer monitor. If you have the extra cash and adequate desktop real estate, an LCD TV might be the right PC monitor for you.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

16 comments
bboyd
bboyd

Main computer for my wife is set up to do all the media in the house. Wireless keyboard sits on the coffee table with a mouse. The computer has a secondary monitor when she wants to sit at the desk and write. Why buy a monitor when I have a perfectly good one on the wall?

perkie
perkie

An LCD TV is my computer monitor and I love it, there is not so much clutter.

santeewelding
santeewelding

I've been using a 30-odd inch Sony Bravia hung on the wall in front of me for a couple three years now.

criccio1
criccio1

LCD TV's are 1920x1080. PC LCD's are up to 2560x1600. People actually use the added screen real-estate.

Fyrewerx
Fyrewerx

As I replace my 50" DLP with a new LCD, I ponder using the DLP in the computer room. Probably would still only use it for TV watching, or the rare game. Two of my PCs have HD tuners and my area has over 38 over the air channels (many duplicate). My DLP is an older Samsung -- no built-in HD tuner.

ga6939russell
ga6939russell

Only if a person has enough money to spend on the unit. Both types of monitor cost quite a lot and while larger monitors with higher resolution offer more real estate, not everyone can afford them.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

"A couple three years" isn't that six years? ;)

PrinceGaz
PrinceGaz

A typical 24" monitor has roughly the same resolution as a 1080p TV. A typical 24" monitor fits nicely on your desk, whereas a usually much larger 1080p LCD TV does not. Most people using computers (be they laptop or desktop) for other than media-centre applications find it much more convenient for the display to be on the desk where they are working, along with any documents and their printer/scanner etc. It just makes more sense for the display to be roughly the same distance away as everything else to avoid constantly refocussing your vision. A large 1080p LCD TV (the usual 37" or bigger) doesn't work well on a desk as the pixels are too big; it has to be mounted further away to look right, and that makes it unsuited to any desk-type work as the screen really needs to be there on the desk with everything else.

JohnOfStony
JohnOfStony

With the resolutions of many computer monitors now beyond that of HDTV, I can see many people watching TV on their computer monitors but not many using their TV as a computer monitor. There is the added disadvantage of family conflict of interest - if some people want to watch TV and some want to play on the computer, having just the one display would be a problem, and if a second display is required, why limit it to the resolution of HDTV?

Datacommguy
Datacommguy

A TV includes additional circuitry for the RF receiver, tuner, etc, and as such is usually more expensive. That alone will cause most folks to buy a TV for the family room and a monitor for their PC rather than two TV's.

TonytheTiger
TonytheTiger

as long as they don't need their TV and their computer at the same time.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Not all LCD panels have the same resolution, in fact there is a great variance. The LCD will match the output resolution of the video card, if it is capable, in which case many high end panels now come with greater than 1080i reolution for high res graphics cards to utilize them, if not, simply match your cards output to the max on the TV and you lose nothing. Some popular models, which used to be the high end offer 1080 X 1920 (which is enough for 1080i) but they increase all the time. I've seen them grow from 40" offering only 1280 X 720 to the 3840. We carry a manufacturer that has designed an HD LCD TV that is 3840 X 2160 (2160p Quad HD format for broadcast quality around 2015), sure it costs more than most people's cars, but price has little bearing in my industry, which outfits many homes worth between 7 and 25 million. Though its not a common price point yet, it will be when it is released around 2015 and 1080i becomes quickly obsolete. I find my basic 42" LCD TV is great with my notebook, for movies etc. but I generally use the notebook's LCD for most computing tasks. With the newer multimedia PC's, I find more and more homes are built with multimedia servers running multiple graphics cards to all LCD's in the house. The home owner can use a wireless keyboard with built in mouse and IR emitters/repeaters to the main distribution matrix. It's becoming quite common in new homes now actually.

rkuhn040172
rkuhn040172

PC monitor manufacturers have a leg up on TV manufacturers. And that is cost. PC monitors can be cranked out very inexpensively. Users will choose costs over anything else.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

A yo. I didn't realize you had the cred for it. :)

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

Catering to the security market, I have seen the difference between a security monitor (LCD Panel) and a regular LCD panel, lifespan and contrast ration. A monitor designed for surveillance use with a camera costs more than double what a normal LCD panel costs. It also lasts a lot longer and doesn't suffer burn in from still images. LCD TV's are similar, sure ther eare cheapo ones that will die as fast as any other screen but the quality TV's will outlast a basic computer LCD. The balance between components is imperative, some people use a cheapo backlight system and the screen dies in one year, others use high end components that are properly matched which work longer because components actually complement each other, rather than having a mix of weak components that wear each other out.

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