Windows

Stop users accidentally installing Internet Explorer 9 on Windows 7

Bill Detwiler uses Microsoft's Internet Explorer 9 Blocker Toolkit to prevent Windows 7 from marking IE 9 as an important update.

Be default, Windows Update treats Internet Explorer 9 like an important update, and automatically flags it for installation. If a user isn't careful the next time they run Windows Update, they could install the browser without meaning to. During this week's episode of TR Dojo, I show you how to stop Windows Update from marking IE9 as an important update--reducing the chance for an accidental install.

You can download the Internet Explorer 9 Blocker Toolkit directly from Microsoft.

For those who prefer text to video, click the View Transcript link below the video player window or read Greg Shultz's article, "Prevent the automatic delivery of Windows Internet Explorer 9 in Windows 7".

You can also sign up to receive the latest TR Dojo lessons through one or more of the following methods:

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

15 comments
KeithAu001
KeithAu001

I have 3 machines, a desktop with XP, a laptop with Vista and a newer desktop with Win 7. IE 9 is on both Vista and 7, as a secondary browser. I develop websites, so I need multi platforms and browsers. While IE9 is far better than IE8 it is still behind the times so far as CSS goes, there are some features like rounded corners WITH gradients, you cant seem to have both, and it doesnt seem to like text shadows... It is a little quicker to load, but until Microsoft gets with the game and plays nice with W3C rules, regulations, and standards it will always remain a non primary browser. Google chrome, Opera 10, safari all play nice, but IE (Microsoft) just wont play nice at all. Come on MS you may be a large software company but its about time you learned to play well with others, you are not that good!!!!!

techrepublic
techrepublic

I have IE8 installed only for those odd pages that need it. I use FF5 for everything else. I don't let any updates install automatically. IE9 has been hidden in Windows Update so it doesn't bug me all the time. MS has some strange ideas at times about what a critical update actually is.

dhays
dhays

I use IE 8 as 9 won't work on XP. IE 9 is on my wife's laptop (W7) along with FF5. On my home desktop IE 8. FF 4.5, Chrome v?, Opera, are loaded, but rarely used. We have had problems with IE 8, 9 not displaying ESPN3 full screen when streaming a baseball game and have to switch to FF to get it right. It worked right the first few times then it didn't, don't have any idea why. Will upgrade OS when I have to, maybe next year to W8.

SteveTheBee
SteveTheBee

Thanks for that Bill, however my customers are all domestic so it probably won't be of too much use. :-( Just yesterday I had a customer who had inadvertently installed IE9 on their Vista machine and lost the ability to open PDF attachments within Google Mail. It worked with Safari, it worked with Chrome, but not with IE9. I uninstalled version 9, rolling it back to version 8 and everything worked as it had before. I then hid the update for my customer to ensure that they didn't keep getting pestered by it. Seems there are still some issues even with the full release version. :-( Also, on the quiz, I agree with the comments made about multiple browsers. I usually use Chrome (it's fast) but I do occasionally use IE8 or Firefox for various reasons.

blarman
blarman

Why do you continue to list browser upgrades as "critical" patches? They aren't. And ever since you decided to integrate IE with the kernel, they have caused more problems than they have solved! Every single upgrade of IE from 4 on up has wreaked havoc on critical user programs. This should NOT be the case. I should not have to disable an update to prevent it from wrecking my systems! If the update is that volatile, flag it as "recommended" or "optional" NOT as "critical"! This is one area where Microsoft falls as flat as someone jumping out of a tall building. And the splatter marks are just as gruesome. The move to IE 7 caused us days worth of lost time due to problems. We still haven't rolled out 8 en masse, yet we spent a lot of time "vaccinating" systems against the upgrade. Now we have to spend MORE time doing vaccinations. You're not helping your image here, Ballmer & Co.

Regulus
Regulus

First, Bill, let me thank you again for having the courtesy of providing us with a Text version of the Video. Next, your questionaire: As virtually all of Tech Republic readers are technically oriented, I'm sure that the majority use multiple browsers. Primary, 2nd & 3rd preference checkboxes will probably give you (and us) a more complete picture. And last, do you have a simple solution for reducing IE 9 to 8 on new Win 7 distributed computers with IE 9 pre-installed. Keep up the good work. Dave

rwbyshe
rwbyshe

Is it possible to uninstall the IE9 update? I haven't looked for the specific update yet on any machines but I know it's been installed and am wondering if it's possible to remove it once it has been installed.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

There are several reasons to install Internet Explorer 9--better HTML5 and CSS3 support, improved security, and a cleaner interface. But there are also reasons not install the new browser--perhaps a web-base tool you use on a regular basis doesn't work with IE9, maybe it doesn't run well on your machine, or you just don't like the cleaner interface. Unfortunately, Windows Update treats Internet Explorer 9 like an important update, and automatically flags it for installation. If a user isn???t careful the next time they run Windows Update, they could install the browser without meaning to. During this week???s episode of TR Dojo, I show you how to stop Windows Update from marking IE9 as an important update???reducing the chance for an accidental install. Have you moved to IE 9? Take this week's TR Dojo poll and let me know: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/itdojo/stop-users-accidentally-installing-internet-explorer-9-on-windows-7/2839

Aragorn7
Aragorn7

You may have additional issues. Google PDF works fine in IE9 for me. This is however on a 32Bit Win 7 OS.

Roninwi
Roninwi

Where I am presently working at has a program that will only work with IE8 or lower. Since we were deploying new PCs with Windows 7 & SP1 which come with IE9 this was causing a problem. So I search the web and found the solution I listed below and yes it works. I have tested it. The short version of the procedure to remove IE9 and install IE8 on a Windows 7 SP1 PC. 1. Click on the Start button and then select Control Panel 2. Open Control Panel 3. In the Control Panel window, select Programs and Features 4. Click on the View installed updates 5. In this window scroll down to the Microsoft Window section 6. Select the Windows Internet Explorer 9 7. With the Windows Internet Explorer 9 highlighted, select Uninstall 8. Answer Yes to this question 9. Select Restart Now 10. After the PC restart, check to be sure that IE version was rollback to IE8, open Internet Explorer 11. You are done

cristiano.oliveira
cristiano.oliveira

Yes, if you go to Control Panel / Programs and Features and uninstall Internet Explorer 9 you get your IE8 back as it was after the update.

seanferd
seanferd

It breaks stuff, and no one seems interested in fixing these things. Not MS, not site maintainers.

cristiano.oliveira
cristiano.oliveira

On the windows update window, select de required update (Windows Internet Explorer 9) and click on the right mouse button and choose "Hide Update" and this update will not install automatically, you can do it later on the Windows Update "Restore Hidden Updates".

SteveTheBee
SteveTheBee

Thanks Aragorn7, After searching on other forums (something I didn't have opportunity to do at my customer's house) it seems it may have been a security 'feature' that stops downloading from https websites. Others have had the same problem on upgrading to IE9 but I may never know if this was the problem in this case.

spdragoo
spdragoo

Since they aren't releasing it for Windows XP, I would imagine that those of us still using it won't see it show up in our Windows Update messages. As for "fixing" what it breaks: this happens with *every* browser whenever they do a major change. But at least Microsoft has given enough warning beforehand. One of the local colleges always has to send out messages to the students to hold off on upgrading their IE versions whenever a new version is released (happened when IE7 came out, as well as with IE8)... but they were able to do so because Microsoft gave enough advanced warning.

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