Leadership

Track turnover with our Employee Separation Checklist

TechRepublic's Employee Separation Checklist can help you track the constant flow of employees in and out of your organization. Download the form, customize it to fit your organization's needs, and distribute it to department managers. When an employee leaves, their manager will complete the form and submit it to IT.

TechRepublic's Employee Separation Checklist can help you track the constant flow of employees in and out of your organization. Download the form, customize it to fit your organization's needs, and distribute it to department managers. When an employee leaves, their manager will complete the form and submit it to IT.

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Turnover is a constant part of corporate life, and IT departments must be prepared to handle the flow of employees through the organization. IT managers must take an active part in the separation process, before, during, and after the event.

A familiar situation

A friend once came to me with a situation that started me thinking about this issue. She works for a growing technology company with about 250 employees. An individual that reported to her had just left, and she needed something from this employee's computer. Unfortunately, neither she nor anyone else in the department knew the employee's password. To make things worse, there was no system in place to inform IT that the employee had ever left.

To resolve this issue, my friend e-mailed IT support about the situation, and they solved the problem. However, several hours of confusion and frustration could have been avoided by having a standard procedure in place for employee separations.

Create a standard procedure

During an employee separation, it's important that everyone involved communicate accurately and effectively. The process begins with a manager contacting IT support either prior to or immediately after an employee's departure. The IT department can then take action to revoke the departing worker's network access, redistribute their computer, and collect any portable devices. To facilitate this process, IT support should have a form that managers complete when an employee leaves the company.

TechRepublic's Employee Separation Checklist

Our Employee Separation Checklist, originally published in 2000 and updated in 2006, allows IT departments to collect valuable information such as:

  • Employee Information (name, phone number, location, manager, and so on).
  • Separation Status (voluntary, involuntary, date to revoke access, and so on).
  • Network Access (network, mainframe, e-mail, and so on).
  • Equipment (desktop, laptop, mobile phone, and so on).

The form's final section also allows IT support to track which administrator removes the employee's security access and which technician collects or redistributes the equipment.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

3 comments
Mihnea D. Mironescu
Mihnea D. Mironescu

Good article, and I only wish I had read it when I needed it! Although you're right about the checklist, which comes handy for both IT and the company in case someone leaves the company, I would say that the trigger for this process should be the HR department. It's the HR who first notifies IT and the other departments (like Administration) when a new hire joins in, so it's logical to me that HR should notify the exits as well. As for making a supervisor complete such a form, I really don't think this would stand the reality check. And it's really not that important for a supervisor to know exactly what IT equipment each of his team members have. It's the IT who should have this information and a signed document which proves they gave this employee such and such IT equipment. As for the comments of @mikifinaz1, if you really feel that vulnerable in your actual job to the point that you refuse to blend in or to accept the organizational culture, then open up and make yourself at home while at work, then I don't see the point why you're still there. It doesn't make much sense to me staying in a job with the door always cracked open and waiting any minute for someone to tell me game over! It's a waste both for you (emotionally and psichologically) and for your employer (lack of engagement).

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

I have learned not to participate in any of these documents from either end because they become fodder for lawyers. A simple task list performed by the employee's direct supervisor is sufficient i.e. give me the keys, give me the pwd, call IT etc. This takes a mind set that I have developed as an employee and consultant. "You can be gone in a minute." I treat each day as my last day so my resume is always in order, I bring no personal items, everything I need is kept in my brief case and all the employer's stuff is in the top draw of my desk: keys, list of passwords, etc. More often then not I move on before being asked to leave because I can see the trend i.e. downsizing etc. before most others or I have completed my task and I just call in to HR. I tell them where the envelope etc. is with my resignation, keys etc. in the top drawer of my desk.

Oz_Media
Oz_Media

The biggest lawsuits I've won are from companies who's employee contract and exit interview were over the top. They had a lawyer sit in with me when I quit, I had to laugh as I asked for it to be carried over another week so that my lawyer could review new evidence. Just a joke though. Either way it cost them the best part of $60K, because they wanted to play legal games and I had enough on them to sink their Western office in less than two months. Companies that live in glass houses shouldn't hire lawyers???

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