Security

Vanish helps computers forget and protects your digital privacy

ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das explains how self-destructing data could help protect your privacy.

Digital memories are long. Emails, images, and documents sent today can resurface years from now, but new software could help ensure that what happens online, doesn't have to live there eternally. ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das explains how 'Vanish," the work of researchers at the University of Washington, Seattle, uses peer-to-peer networks to create unique encryption keys.

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Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

5 comments
ndean.jones
ndean.jones

I don't worry about access to my data at this point in time. Most delicate information is passed via voice. BUT with some very large contracts on the horizon with data that requires "level 4" protection; using software such as Vanish will be needed at my facility on all machines.

wizzardsblog
wizzardsblog

There's me thinking it's a stain removal product :-) I subscribe to free will, if people want to use it then they'll use it, all you can do is raise awareness that there are products out there that can protect your privacy. I wouldn't use the program myself.

cfphillips
cfphillips

What does this mean in the world of SOX or HPPA? Will archives truly become dead files?

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

An elephant may never forget, but unlike the Internet (which as an equally long memory), they aren't likely to resurface those embarrassing photos of you at the last holiday party. In the above post's video, ZDNet correspondent Sumi Das explains how 'Vanish," the work of researchers at the University of Washington, Seattle, uses peer-to-peer networks to create unique encryption keys and help ensure that what happens online, doesn't have to live there eternally From an IT perspective, do you think it's good for computers to forget? Original video and poll: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=1531

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