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Video: Answers to five questions about IPv6

The switch from Internet Protocol version four to Internet Protocol version six is a hot topic on TechRepublic. If you're still unsure what this change really means, stay tuned. Bill Detwiler shares answers from industry experts on five basic IPv6 questions.

The switch from IPv4 to IPv6 is a hot topic on TechRepublic. If you're still unsure what this change really means, stay tuned. In this IT Dojo video, I share answers from industry experts to five basic IPv6 questions.

Since TechRepublic members had lots of questions about Ip-v-6, Michael Kassner, one of our Network Administration bloggers, interviewed experts at the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN) and Command Information--a private company which provides Internet services. We've used the material from those interviews for this video.

For those of you who prefer text to video, you can click the Transcript link that appears below the video player window. For more information on IPv6, check out the following downloads and articles from Kassner and others:

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About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

25 comments
jhoughton
jhoughton

wow.. did you really have to read out all the hex info? LOL..... "a picture paints a thousand words"

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

I debated speaking the addresses vs. just showing them on the screen. In the end, I decided to read the addresses aloud for those who may have a visual impairment, but still find the audio useful.

kenyonej
kenyonej

Hi, I'd just like to know what's the difference between dual stacking and ipv6 natting. I would love to know some GREAT books out there on ipv6. thanks!!

Kingbackwards
Kingbackwards

Since IPv6 has a lot more digits and different printed format. What are some of the more common "IP addresses" Such as what would the new loop book be? The 127.0.0.1 equivalent. Would the default network be ::::? Or the 0.0.0.0 equivalent. (Although given some hardware/software configurations I've seen the "default" be some other number.) Would the broadcast be FFFF:FFFF:FFFF:FFFF? or the 255.255.255.255 equivalent. What about "common internal network"? The 192.168.#.# equivalent. If anyone can shed light on this that would be great since these are probably the major address we will want to know or encounter. And if there are any new special addresses to be aware of.

jsklein
jsklein

In IPv6, localhost address is ::1 0 and 255, has not significances in IPv6 as it does in IPv4. Broadcast are performed with neighbor discovery protocol, and not broadcasts. In IPv4 we have the RFC1918 (192.168.x.x), in IPv6 we have RFC4193, also called ULA or Unique Local Addresses (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unique_local_address). Yes, there are many other addresses, go check out wiki on IPv6 for others.

harding
harding

Too long!! I could have read the technical content of this video in seconds. If it really has to be a video, then did it really need to do things like spell out "two zero zero one colon zero dee bee eight colon zero zero four nine colon zero zero zero zero colon aye bee zero zero colon zero zero zero zero colon zero zero zero zero colon zero one zero two" ?? Really?

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

I debated speaking the addresses vs. just showing them on the screen. In the end, I decided to read the addresses aloud for those who may have a visual impairment, but still find the audio useful.

rwbyshe
rwbyshe

Bill - A very good presentation both in content and delivery. Very easy to understand in the manner you presented it. Also - I love the "out takes" at the end... it shows that we're all still human after all. Thanks, and again well done.

fullerwe
fullerwe

WoW...excellent presentation. I'll now be able to explain this when I get asked about moving to IPv6...well done.

spreston
spreston

If you made it any easier to understand then I think that even management would be able to understand it. Maybe.

tony
tony

A very easy to understand presentation. Well done team.

Milstar7
Milstar7

Great explanation of IPv4 and IPv6.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

Thanks. I'm glad you found the video useful. Michael Kassner also deserves a round of thanks for collecting most of the this information and for writing the article on which we based the video.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

The switch from IPv4 to IPv6 is a hot topic on TechRepublic. If you're still unsure what this change really means, stay tuned. In the IT Dojo blog, I share answers from industry experts to five basic IPv6 questions. Original post: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=262 How prepared is your organization for IPv6? Take are quick poll and let us know: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=269

chrisgoode
chrisgoode

How are subnets going to effect the new protocol? Would every device configured with an IPv6 IP be on the same subnet mask?

jsklein
jsklein

That depends on your network and the IPv6 address block you get assigned. With IPv6, everything to the right of the 64 bit boundary is a local network. Everything to the left deals with routing. If you are a small company, you can be allocated a /56 address public address, this provides you with 8 bits of subneting or 256 subnets. The purge organization can be allocated /48 , providing 16 bit so subnetting or 65536 subnets. Note, a 0 and 255 does not have special significance in IPv6, as it does in IPv4, there for you can use these two addresses. To learn more, please check out the Anatomy of an IPv6 address at this site: http://www.commandinformation.com/ipv6/ipv6_anatomy.html Joe Klein Command Information

alexmillen
alexmillen

Because the IPv6 is devided into network:host grouping I guess there is no subnetting as such; the network portion would take care of that?

doug m.
doug m.

Good presentation Bill.

mleach
mleach

I know there is a need for IPv6 on the public domain however it seems like overkill to roll it out at the enterprise level. It seems that IPv6 just isn't intuitive enough to be quickly configured, managed, or troubleshot in the enterprise without the address space being heavy abbreviated (abc::1001). I think it would be much more difficult working with IPv6, which leads me to my question. IANA carved out several "private-use" IPv4 segments that could not be used on the internet. Is there any similar Address spaces carved out for IPv6?

jsklein
jsklein

IPv6 is not IPv4, there are not only more addresses, but a larger took kit to manage and security any enterprises network. So your process of quickly configuring, managing or troubleshooting will take some time to learn. Go get a book or take a class. As far as carved out ?private-use? addresses, IPv6 support ULA or Unique Local Addresses (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unique_local_address) and will provide you with enough addresses and subnets to handle any size network. Joe Klein Command Information

mleach
mleach

Private/Unregistered/Nonrouteable Addresses, Private addresses are indicated by the address having "1111 1110 1" for the first nine bits. Thus, private addresses have a first octet value of "FE" in hexadecimal, with the next hex digit being from "8" to "F". These addresses are further divided into two types based on their scope, described below. Loopback Address, The loopback address is 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1, which is normally expressed using zero compression as "::1". Unspecified Address, In IPv4, an IP address of all zeroes has a special meaning; it refers to the host itself, and is used when a device doesn't know its own address. In IPv6 this concept has been formalized, and the all-zeroes address (0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0) is named the unspecified address. It is typically used in the source field of a datagram sent by a device seeking to have its IP address configured. Zero compression can be applied to this address; since it is all zeroes, the address becomes just "::". I found this inforation at, http://www.tcpipguide.com/free/t_IPv6SpecialAddressesReservedPrivateLinkLocalSiteLo.htm

jrnesbit
jrnesbit

Is it me or is that really a horrible sound track? Im getting a ton of background noise like a mixer is set wrong.....

jwlindsey
jwlindsey

today for some reason by network connection was slow making the whole presentation choppy. For a solution I just "paused" it while I did something else. When I came back to it the buffer had filled enough to let me play uninterrupted to the end.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

I think we used the same mixing process during this video as the others. Have you noticed poor sound quality on previous IT Dojo videos?

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