Windows

Video: Enable Windows 7 logon screensaver with a registry hack

Bill Detwiler shows you how to enable a Windows 7 logon screensaver with a quick and easy registry hack.

Unlike Windows XP and Vista, Windows 7 doesn't launch a screensaver if you leave the computer idle on the logon (or Welcome) screen. But, there is a way to change this behavior. During this episode of TR Dojo, I show you how to enable a Windows 7 logon screensaver with a quick and easy registry hack.

For those who prefer text to video, you can click the Transcript link that appears below the video player window. And for those Windows XP users who want to modify their logon screensavers, check out Greg Shultz's article, "Configure the Windows XP logon screen saver."

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About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

10 comments
rhine
rhine

Hey Bill Where is this Matrix Screensaver you used?; It does'nt show on the software list; Is it free? Is it the one that just shows code? Not exactly sure all that work is worth it LOL

Roc Riz
Roc Riz

The best, and only REAL "screen saver," is the power button on the monitor. Heck, these days, if you really want to save power, pull the plug, because it's using power just by being plugged in.

psu1989
psu1989

hack? really? I remember when things like this were called edits.

JonGauntt
JonGauntt

Screensavers have been knee-jerk reactions for so long, but after Windows 7 came out we had to re-evaluate our policies on it. Why do we need screensavers anymore? Newer screens don't suffer from burn in and in a lot of cases the screensavers cause the monitors to use more power than if they weren't running. Our decision was to set it to just turn the monitor off after 10 minutes and forego screensavers altogether. I think it was a good choice by Microsoft. This is a good thought though on the login screensaver for our domain, so I'll have to see if I can find a good "blank" screensaver that can kick in after 60-180 seconds. Otherwise, is there a good reason (not a cosmetic one) to use a screensaver anymore?

ScottLander
ScottLander

Wow, that's a lot of work just to enable this. Thanks to the author for preparing the instructions. IMO, this is a perfect example which shows that although Windows 7 is "ahead" in technology compared to previous Windows, it has some peculiar new features which limit what one can do when considering how it was capable to do so in previous versions. This is just one such example. There are quite a few other annoyances with Windows 7 which make it difficult to achieve the same level of ease which XP had: - ability to remember folder view settings - somewhat confusing/unnecessary directory tree structure for user files - inability to easily turn off or disable certain aero features without adversely impacting other simple desktop customization (for example, if you disable aero then you are all of a sudden stuck with a permanent color for the task bar). I should actually start maintaining a list of these annoyances, to remind me why I still prefer XP. It it weren't for the fact that HP doesn't make Windows XP drivers for my recently new laptop, I wouldn't be running Windows 7. It shows just how deep and strong Microsoft's influence is over hardware vendors. Most people running Windows 7 today aren't people who chose it. They inherited it with their new computer. Big difference when Microsoft talks about the skyrocket sales of Windows 7.

john3347
john3347

While screen burn-in is supposedly a thing of the past, when one has approximately 4000 family photographs and scenery pictures from around the world, a screensaver makes good use of these pictures.

AstroCreep
AstroCreep

The one and only non-Direct 3D screensaver in Windows 7 (and Server 2008 R2) is the "Blank" screensaver - C:\Windows\System32\scrnsave.scr Nothing fancy, that's for sure, but if you want to have the display turn off after a period of inactivity (say, to enable a terminal "lock") and your system won't allow for cutting the power to the default monitor (like in a VM), then you could use this screensaver.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

In this TR Dojo episode, I show you how to enable a Windows 7 logon screensaver with a quick and easy registry hack. But while screensavers were all the rage in days of the CRT, OS power management features and LCD monitors have made them less of a necessity and more of luxury. Do you still use a screensaver? If so, why? Take the poll and let me know. Original post and poll: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=1971

Cakalaky
Cakalaky

I use Auslogics Disk Defrag Screen Saver. While the screensaver is running, your computer is being defraged. Works great.

hariks0
hariks0

I love the bubbles screen saver of Windows.