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Video: Five Active Directory design best practices

Bill Detwiler shares five Active Directory best practices that can help you maximize efficiency, simplify maintenance, and effectively manage AD.

The way you design your Active Directory can make a huge difference in how well your network functions and how easy it is to administer. During this week's TR Dojo episode, I share five best practices that can help you maximize efficiency, simplify maintenance, and effectively manage AD as your organization grows.

For those who prefer text to video, you can click the Transcript link that appears below the video player window or check out Jack Wallen's article, "10 tips for effective Active Directory design."

For more Active Directory configuration and troubleshooting advice, check out the following resources:

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About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

4 comments
cwallace
cwallace

The yellow shirt makes it look like a SPRINT commercial. Bring back the BLUE!!!

pafrisch
pafrisch

For the size that it is, which is small 20 nodes, yes. Even though a few of the "rules" were violated. This is to be expected as this is for a non-profit and there are a few other places to spend money. Like a good firewall with content filtering.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

During this week's TR Dojo episode, I share five best practices that can help you maximize efficiency, simplify maintenance, and effectively manage AD as your organization grows, including: 1. Keeling your design simple 2. Using the appropriate site topology 3. Using dedicated domain controllers 4. Having at least two DNS servers 5. Placing at least one global catalog server in each site Thinking about your organization's current AD design, how would you categorize it--good, excellent, or poor? Take the poll and let me know. Original post and poll: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=2154