Mobility

Video: Five mistakes to avoid when supporting smartphones and mobile devices

Bill Detwiler outlines five mistakes that IT departments should avoid when supporting smartphones and mobile devices.

Mobile devices have been around in one form or another for decades, but with the recent proliferation of smartphones and tablets, they are now a significant IT support issue. These devices bring several unique challenge and potential pitfalls. During this week's TR Dojo episode, I share five mistakes that IT departments should avoid when supporting mobile devices.

For those who prefer text to video, you can click the Transcript link that appears below the video player window or check out Brien Posey's article, "10 things you should know about supporting mobile devices."

For more mobile device support advice, check out the following resources:

You can also sign up to receive the latest TR Dojo lessons through one or more of the following methods:

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

10 comments
crowleye
crowleye

I want to express my appreciation for Bill's videos. He has put a lot into these, and they really are useful training tools. I am not always in a position to have audio running, and would like to suggest that he include the text of his message, or an abridged version, in the post for those who cannot watch the video.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

During this week's TR Dojo episode, I share five mistakes that IT departments should avoid when supporting smartphones and mobile devices. One mistake I discuss is not providing IT staff adequate training on the mobile devices they are required to support. Is this a problem in your organization? Take the poll and let me know. Original post and poll: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=2172

reggaethecat
reggaethecat

I respect your opinion, and fair play to TechRepublic for making things available in multiple formats, but is it really worth making a seven minute video of a guy sat behind a desk for something this simple? I read the transcript in literally 30 seconds, I didn't have to put any headphones on, no-one else in the office had to listen to it, and it didn't look like I was wasting my time when my boss walks behind me. Save video for football!

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

I understand completely. If you prefer text to video, click the Transcript link below the video player window. Clicking the link should produce a pop-up window with a complete transcript of the video.

mike
mike

How in the heck do they get away with selling them when a phone reported stolen is basicly useless. Are the hackers making use of them in some way? Thanks

Glastron
Glastron

After several different phones showed up requesting to be connected I begged managment to enforce the policy. Unfortunately they don't provide me with a phone or training to actually learn how to use it before it is supposed to go live on the network. Now we have a mix of personal and company phones all running different OSes that I need to support. I.T., it's not a job it's an adventure!

royala
royala

I don't have a link there either, and usually use it instead. Using IE9 beta on new 7 pro 64 pc.

Chipv
Chipv

Pop the sim out and there is no trace of it being stolen

phudson38
phudson38

Seems like it would be just as easy to take your phone to a new provider but, NO. They have to sell you a completely new phone with a new contract. My management's attitude is I'm responsible for my own training and if I can't support the product then they need to fire me and hire someone who can for less money.

agoodspeed
agoodspeed

there's always serial numbers to be tracked. I don't think the seller or buyer care about where the phone came from, and the seller certainly doesn't care if the buyer can't use the phone. So, buyer beware is an understatement - I can only imagine some sucker trying to activate a "new" phone only to be detained for questioning.

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