Leadership optimize

Video: Five Sysinternals tools every IT pro should use

Bill Detwiler shows you five of the handiest tools Sysinternals has to offer, including PsList, PsKill, Process Explorer, and Autoruns.

There are plenty of third-party and built-in tools designed to help you administer Windows systems. But perhaps none earn more kudos from IT pros, than the bundled utilities that are part of Mark Russinovich and Bryce Cogswell's Sysinternals Suite. They're so good, in fact, that Microsoft acquired them back in 2006. During today's TR Dojo episode, I show you five of the handiest tools Sysinternals has to offer.

For those who prefer text to video, you can click the Transcript link that appears below the video player window or check out Derek Schualand's article, "10 Sysinternals tools you shouldn't be without."

Check out the following links mentioned during the show:

You can also sign up to receive the latest TR Dojo lessons through one or more of the following methods:

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

4 comments
Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

In this week's TR Dojo episode, I show you five of the handiest tools Sysinternals has to offer, including PsList, PsKill, Process Explorer, and Autoruns. Do you use these or any other Sysinternals tools on a regular basis? Take the poll and let me know. Original post and poll: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=2284

wmroc
wmroc

Not all of us can hear.

waynemeat
waynemeat

Process Monitor is one of the system internals that has made my work a little easier. For me it is a very useful tool for debugging during the build and testing stages. One of my roles is specialising in creating fixes for virtualised applications (Softgrid/ App-V). Occasionally, and especially with larger applications, many files and keys are not added to the virtual bubbles because they are either missing or there is a conflict with a file already present on the system that it will be used on. Process Monitor allows me to pinpoint specific objects that an application wants to read write and execute. It can be a little time consuming but luckily it allows me to apply filters to narrow down the activity going on.

Spitfire_Sysop
Spitfire_Sysop

Seriously, I am wondering who doesn't use the Sysinternals tools at some point or another? I have recently found good use for PSEXEC.EXE I need to run programs on a remote server that I don't have the ability to log on locally to. Psexec in a little batch file can fire off this job whenever I need it. I found that you can use Psexec to perform "Run as" magic locally as well. You can even run processes as the SYSTEM account which seems like it would lead straight in to gaping security holes. Something for application developers to keep in mind. Don't think "users won't run my application as the SYSTEM account". Always plan for everything.