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Video: Intel director explains why multicore processors offer better performance on less power

Intel director James Reinders looks at the power, memory, and instruction-level parallelism walls that have forced the move to multicore processors.

Multicore processors have been around for several years, but are they here to stay? Intel director James Reinders looks at the power, memory, and instruction-level parallelism walls that have forced the move to multicore processors, and explains why sometimes it makes sense to underclock, not overclock. At the end of the video he briefly consideres the possibility of putting "hundreds of smaller cores together" onto a single CPU.

Note: This video was originally published as part of ZDNet's Parallelism Breakthrough series - sponsored by Intel.

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Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

8 comments
Hare_Haray
Hare_Haray

This is very well explained! Congratulations to the people who put together. However, I have a question: In a PC, the slowest unit is the hard-drive. We should be able to get a lot more if we had 2 drives. Any studies on that?

a_laborer
a_laborer

one big question i have is when i buy a 2ghz dual core processor, each core is 2ghz or 1ghz?

a_laborer
a_laborer

one big question i have is when i buy a 2ghz dual core processor, each core is 2ghz or 1ghz?

georgelawlor16
georgelawlor16

It would be very interesting to hear/see about video presentation. As CPU cores and speed change which changes produce the best video with the lowest CPU and Memory access load? Where does the best approach lie between the PCI video card and or the on-mother board video processor that shares main memory?

Slayer_
Slayer_

yes, I was thinking of Games, where a games framerate is essentially how fast your CPu can loops, usually a single CPU, you can of course have multiple CPU's painting to the same screen, but each time to keep these in sync, requires extra coding overhead, thus reducing frame rates, causing a diminishing returns effect. Code to manage 1000 processors running at 200mhz each would be a lot less effecient then 4 processors running at a ghz each. However, imagine having that one primary monster CPU dedicated to w/e your focused task is, and those 100 other processors are just managing background tasks or smaller tasks that don't require the crazy speeds. Now that is something interesting :).

BALTHOR
BALTHOR

The computer is a digital machine everything in it is digital.The CPU is where all of the work is done.It's a memory chip where the files reside.My Microwave Oven can do it so can my computer.When you can not access the real entire BIOS then the machine is compromised.

fernblatt7
fernblatt7

A 2GHz device runs at 2GHz. The processors - single or multi-core - all are synched to the clock rate of 2 GHz. - A multi-core CPU is packaged in a singe chip, so it is more efficient - it does away with the extra support and interface structure needed with multiple processors and with the cores assembled and connected together in a single CPU chip with very small distances between each core, there isn't as much of a problem with latency and synch as might be seen in a system with multiple "single core" CPU devices. This is much more important in modern hardware with very high clock rates than it was just a few short years ago when clock rates of a few hundred Mhz were the norm.

Thmiuatga
Thmiuatga

In my opinion, using a PCI card as opposed to the on-board graphics card would be better because the GPU on the card will be handling the tasking of rendering and processing the video instead of that load being put on the CPU which will slow it down considerably. In addition, the process goes smoother with systems that don't have shared system memory. I have done some video work in the past but more audio now since my DVR card doesn't work well with XP X64. I find the speed of the processing and quality of the data far superior than if I was using the built-in Mobo Audio circuits ( I have a SB-Live X-FI X-treme audio card). It also pays to have a powerful CPU and plenty of memory in either case or you are just wasting your time.

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