Laptops

Video: OQO model 2+ is eye-catching but fills a very narrow niche

At CES 2009, OQO unveiled the next model of its ultra-mobile PC--the OQO model 2+. OQO offers the model 2+ in 1.33GHz and 1.86GHz configurations, the later with an OLED touchscreen display. Watch a video of the unit in action.

At CES 2009, OQO unveiled the next model of its ultra-mobile PC--the OQO model 2+. OQO offers the model 2+ in 1.33GHz and 1.86GHz configurations with the following specifications:

1.33GHz (base price $999 US)
  • Intel Atom Z520 CPU
  • Windows XP Home
  • 60GB HDD
  • 1GB DDR2 SDRAM
  • WiFi 802.11a/b/g + Bluetooth
  • 5" Wide VGA LCD touchscreen
1.86GHz (base price $1,499 US)
  • Intel Atom Z540 CPU
  • Windows vista Business or Windows XP Pro
  • 120GB HDD or optional 60GB SSD (+$700 US)
  • 2GB DDR2 SDRAM
  • WiFi 802.11a/b/g + Bluetooth
  • 5" Wide VGA active matrix OLED touchscreen
  • Optional embedded 3G Gobi Global Mobile Internet chip (+$149 US)

A docking station, with dual layer CD/DVD +-RW drive, is available for $399 US.

The OQO model 2+ is a very powerful ultra-mobile PC and its OLED display produces a beautiful picture. Yet the model 2+ will, like its predecessor, likely be a device that fills a very narrow niche. At $1,499, or even $999, the OQO model 2+ is not a second computer. It is a desktop replacement, which means you need the docking station--taking the price to $1,398 or $1,898. Add cellular Internet connectivity and the price jumps to $2,047. These prices don't even include the cost of an external monitor, keyboard, and mouse.

I understand the idea behind the OQO model 2+ -- a fully-functional PC that can go from your desk to your jacket pocket. I'm just not sure many business users will pay such a hefty price for an ultra-mobile PC.

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

13 comments
carlos.martini
carlos.martini

It's a really cool machine! But well... I don't want to be inconvenient, but please, can you try to shake less the gadgets, when display them in video? It's difficult to see details right way.

tjsobieski
tjsobieski

I would want this instead of an Asus Eee because????? Oh it's Sony and expensive!

farren
farren

The OQO is not by Sony. And it's much, much smaller than an Asus Eee, too. Like I said before - its niche is narrow, extremely narrow. But within that niche, the OQO is superb.

timmyjohnboy
timmyjohnboy

I think a netbook would better in this niche.

Hans.Hilberink
Hans.Hilberink

I would never buy it with Windows XP. I have a netbook with Atom cpu and Windows XP, XP really sucks, I installed Vista and now my netbook rocks!!! XP is obsolete!!!

farren
farren

The OQO is *NOT* a desktop replacement. No way. If you'd ever used one, you'd realize that. It is exactly what the acronym UMPC describes, an ultra-mobile PC. It's small enough to fit into a pocket, much smaller than a netbook. Think of it as a shrunken netbook, if you will. That gives it the narrow niche it occupies, a niche it fills quite well, but not one that most folks are going to be interested in filling. During our evaluation of the OQO last year, it proved to be unsuitable for our needs, simply because we needed not only the ability to take the thing anywhere, but also the ability to type on it, which you can't really do comfortably (the keyboard is way too small). But I can easily see other circumstances where the capabilities it *does* have would be quite useful. Not many, but hey, he did say 'narrow'.

adelacuesta
adelacuesta

- loading it with windows 7? or linux? Will it perform better? - loading a good speech to text program for those transcribers? Will this relieve the crampy keyboard?

crystalwolf
crystalwolf

I want to get one to play PC games in a hand-held way and work on my mapping and 3D models on the go. The touch screen would be perfect for some of the tile-based game editors and any flash game utilising the mouse. If you kept in standby-mode, it would function as a palm and be great for taking notes and ideas for your projects. I believe it also comes with a camera for taking pictures or on the go webcasting. - Mikemc

panzrwagn
panzrwagn

Considering what ASUS , Dell and HP offer for Netbooks at $400, this is probably worth a $100 premuium...

ortizrodz
ortizrodz

WOMAN!! stop shaking the thing...

deb
deb

It is indeed beautiful. I'm intrigued by UMPCs, but I have yet to buy one. I have my Omnia smart phone for email and limited web browsing when I'm on the go, and it fits my pocket much better than a UMPC. If I need to do "real" computing tasks, I have my very compact Sony T series laptop. Carrying the UMPC would necessitate carrying some sort of bag, and if I'm going to do that, I might as well take the Sony. That said, if the price were about half what it is ($700 for the OLED model) I might buy one anyway, just for the sheer beauty of the screen. On the other hand, for only a couple hundred dollars more, I could get the Sony P series ... nah, UMPC still loses out.