Emerging Tech

Video: Reduce power use in your data center or server room

From virtualization to hardware consolidation, Bill Detwiler gives IT pros five practical ways to save power in your server room or datacenter.

Reducing the power used by your organization's data center or server room is a good idea for at least two reasons.

First, it can reduce your power bill, and who doesn't want to save money. Second, if your server room has reached capacity with respect to the power available in your facility, then cutting back on your power use may be the only way to add more equipment-without rewiring you building.

During this week's TR Dojo episode, I give you five practical power-saving tips for the server room or data center.

Server room nightmares

Think your server room is a mess? Check out these server room nightmares:

For those who prefer text to video, click the View Transcript link below the video player windows or check out Rick Vanover's article, "Practical power-saving tips for IT pros," on which this video is based.

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About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

5 comments
frederik_ferrell
frederik_ferrell

I personally deal specifically with the Dell server line and use them to virtualize clients existing environments. Even though the infamous PowerEdge 2950 has 64-bit capabilities and runs ESXi like a champ, I highly recommend that you take a look at the new server line. The R710 uses a considerable less amount of power and that adds up in power and cooling savings. If I am having to invest in new hard drives or memory anyway, I will run the numbers to see the best option.

helix2301
helix2301

Great post that really hits home I know a lot of my clients have came to me with these concerns. A lot of companies are looking to cut there datacenter cost due to budget, funding and revenue issues. I have forwarded this post a long to a few clients.

ccie5000
ccie5000

Cooling energy requirements (and costs) can be reduced 30-55% in most data centers. Look for: - incorrect row directionality - cascading equipment exhausts - recirculation within cabinets - blow-by at the rack bottom - uneven air flow - hot spots - air short-circuiting - leaky raised floors - hot and cold air mixing - humidity instability - improperly regulated reheat circuits - limited capacities - improper set-points - comfort cooling vs. process cooling The guy who used to be Google's data center architect started Precision Air and Energy Services. (Disclosure: I'm not affiliated with PA&E, but the founder is a former coworker, friend, and IMO genius at HVAC.) In a typical data center they reduce energy costs 30-55% via precise air flow control and variable water/glycol flow. They also train staff to keep everything in balance after they're gone.

csalas1962
csalas1962

Hi Bill, I noted that you didn't mention the use of a power management system like Joulex, Power Assure or Viridity. I haven't had any experience with any of them but I understand they let you identify, measure the power consumption of any device connected to the network.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

In this week's TR Dojo episode, I discuss five practical ways to save power in your server room or data center, such as: - Server virtualization - Hardware consolidation - Ditching the KVM switches and monitors - Reworking/repairing the cooling system - Avoiding frivolous IT purchases Which of these techniques has produced the best results in your server room or data center? Answer this week's poll and let me know. Original post and poll: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/itdojo/video-reduce-power-use-in-your-data-center-or-server-room/2614