Windows

Video: Three critical issues to consider before upgrading to Windows 7

IT professionals can already download Windows 7 from Microsoft, and the retail release happens on October 22. Now is the time to determine how the new OS will affect you. As Bill Detwiler explains, IT departments should consider hardware requirements, upgrade paths, and driver compatibility before rolling out Windows 7.

IT professionals can already download Windows 7 through Microsoft's TechNet or MSDN, and the retail release will take place on October 22. Now is the time to determine how the new Microsoft operating system will affect your organization. As I explain in this TR Dojo video, IT departments should consider hardware requirements, upgrade paths, and driver compatibility before rolling out Windows 7.

For those of you who prefer text to video, you can click the Transcript link that appears below the video player window or you can also read Debra Shinder's article, "10 questions to consider when planning a Windows 7 upgrade," on which this video is based. To learn more about moving from the Windows 7 beta to the Windows 7 RC, check out Brad Bird's article, "Upgrade path to Windows 7 RC from the Windows 7 beta release."

You can also sign up to receive the latest IT Dojo lessons through one or more of the following methods:

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

57 comments
Devonmcnulty
Devonmcnulty

With no upgrade from XP it will be significantly higher priced. Won't be upgrading until I absolutely have no choice. Be interesting to see if this also has a big effect on home users etc.

mchy607
mchy607

what are main problem

roy.evison
roy.evison

Can only here the sound as a low murmur-Ubuntu 9.04

artanbori
artanbori

hmm sounds like 98 - 2000 - XP all over again - Vista being 2000 - great but no drivers for peripherals and XP being sound solid 98 software that all education and offices have finally gotten around to upgrading all machines to -and so reluctant to leave behind Now the support is diminishing guess we shall begin to walk before they make us run - much in same way everyone moved over from 98 - reluctantly. Why say expense is currently an issue ...the expense has always been an issue but sigh.. i love XP. The time I used to spend reformatting and installing!! By the way, have noticed that Windows Live - incessantly annoying hunk of 3D gunk - singing "I don wanna pickle, just wanna ride my motorcycle..." or message my mum... - burns up my laptop and seems to be most reluctant to listen to my demands of no not that app/feature please!!! Am considering GoogleTalk, except no one else uses it so currently hanging out on a lonely limb. It doesn't seem to burn up so much, but possibly because no communication actually going on??!! Once upon a time David Gates said "why would anyone ever want more than 1 MB of RAM" hah! Well Mr Gates I have some lovely software that I use for most of my image editing - takes all of 4 .... 4 I say, MBs .. take that with a pickled pepper!! Wouldn't swap it for the world! Built for Windows 3.2 I believe, or around the 3.2/95 cusp, bless, and it beats the pants off half the expensive tank-to-cut-the-garden-lawn apps out there. Having said which,have noticed that is also starting to burn me up - wonder if it is SP3? So I can promise I is gonna be very miffed if she don work when circumstances force me / I can afford to upgrade ...hopefully that is what it will be .. an upgrade? a brighter future ...can you really get better than XP? wow!! If it don't work I might just stop telling everyone what a nice man M Gates really is!!! Be warned!!! PS .... if the Paint is so sophisticated hope it has brought back that cute little 3.2 Paint stamp /icon builders app that got me started on this long road - I miss em - don't know why they vanished .. really am not convinced the scary 3D icons we are being plagued with will ever get cute ... give me 2D stills and animations anyday and I miss being able to key in a keyboard smilies especially on the phone ....... they made you laugh twice, once for message and once for silly ingenuity .. ah well as they say Minimalise it.. and I may advertise it ye..ah

puritianb
puritianb

I don't like any Windows system, since XP burned out my CPU. What I found is that Microsoft has added a BIOS control in the Device Mgr. Dir., which takes over the responsibilities of the motherboard and any other card that might come w/its own CPU, thus sending all commands thur the CPU, which in turns burns the CPU out.

badben
badben

Nothing new in the "country of Denmark"...

2je@cox.net
2je@cox.net

@~7.40 et of video, you advise to upgrade drivers b4 w7 install. Are driver upgrades lost after a HD is cleaned? Is it possible to upgrade drivers after w7 install?

Chashew
Chashew

Ok-with all the issues in the building of Vista why should we trust Windows 7? I for one did voice me opinion to my friends about Vista but they ran out and bought it anyways and now always to late realize they should have listened. XP -works just fine and I am appauled that Microsoft is forcing us to go their way or no way. the issues that Windows 7 may have give me a knot in my stomach,and I see problems coming at us again. If you gave XP the power that it takes to run Vista you wouldn't hear anyone wanting more power ever again. Vista loads like 95 used to and what did we gain? Geez sorry people Vista has been hacked,what a snow job. I will do the same this time-I will alert my friends to a possible junk OS again as I no longer trust the service or Techs at Microsoft to get it right this time either.

dbecker
dbecker

If I'm not mistaken, the stock market crash of 1929 was Thursday, October 24th. The release of of Windows 7 is Thursday, October 22nd. If we adjust for the day of the week.... Piece of advice [and you all here are smart enough, you're way ahead]: Wait a bit to see how things turn out....

vmctr
vmctr

Hi, Yes, Windows 7 is definitely better than Vista, but I will make upgrade only then will be released Win7 SP1 and I will have driver for all pc models from my company.

msawyer91
msawyer91

I think Bill is absolutely right here. I ran the Windows 7 public beta, RC and am now on the RTM bits, thanks to my MSDN license. In all three instances (beta, RC, RTM), there is no doubt that Windows 7 runs faster than Vista. It boots faster, logs in faster, launches IE faster and...well...it just plain runs faster. I would put it on par with XP, although I think Windows 7 boots faster than any Windows OS I've ever used, dating all the way back to Windows 3.0 (yes, that's before 3.11). As far as drivers are concerned, Windows happily detected almost every driver in three different test systems I used; all were HP...a dv9910us laptop, G60-230US laptop and a d5200t desktop. For those it didn't natively detect, Windows Update picked them up, so getting those up and running was flawless. Seeing some driver versions were older than vendor-provided Vista drivers, like chipsets, I installed the Vista verions of those and was met with success, except for a modem driver upgrade. I don't use dialup, so no biggie there. And yes, I like the new UAC a lot better. You are no longer pestered with the UAC dialogue for basic system tasks, and if you find the new UAC to still be annoying, you get four levels of UAC to choose from, ranging from the "same as Vista" at the top all the way down to turning it off completely. Windows 7 by default uses the second from the top, which I think is an ideal setting. Despite its shortcomings, I like Vista. But Windows 7, in my opinion, is what Vista should have been. So kudos for Microsoft for finally getting this one right! Matt

tony
tony

sprint and other aircards are not compatible with windows 7. dammit, i may have to roll back to xp,,,,

albertspijkers
albertspijkers

I already did read some articles about upgrade paths from older versions of Windows client software to Windows 7. You focused on important issues to think about before upgrading. I think it is also important to stress the advantages of Windows 7, like much better performance and a better firewall (if active). I would also like to point to the link: http://windows7center.com/news/microsoft-releases-windows-7-upgrade-paths/ for more information. And the downloadable paper from the Microsoft link: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=e170eba1-5bab-401f-bbf5-00f0ee7fe0fb But all in all a good presentation! Good show!

reisen55
reisen55

Having learned our lessons bitterly after the perfect OUT OF THE BOX PRODUCT that was Vista, the IT community should take a dim view of deployment at least in a production environment. My big issues are.... COST My clients are feeling it big time, as I am COMPATIBILITY Do crucial business apps work? And don't argue about XP MODE which makes a good reason to STICK WITH XP. DELAY Do not even consider deployment until field testing.

sal7
sal7

Perfect Video .... Saleh J. Mansour

riceski
riceski

I upgraded from Vista HP -- to Windows7 RC. After I removed a driver - from a newer all in one and re-added the driver again [ setting up two printers - that were both Lexmarks.] the driver would never work. It had quit while adding the lexmark printer and had worked before. This is a real problem to me and makes me not want to chance 7. I looked up some changes and made them but the driver never ever worked. I had to go back to vista -then reload everything and then upgrade to 7 again to make it work. This is something that is scaring me from 7 -- riceski@gmail.com

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

Microsoft is trying to avoid the version confusion Vista's launch created, by emphasizing just two Windows 7 SKUs--Windows 7 Home Premium and Windows 7 Professional. Yet, the Redmond software giant still plans to offer at least six Windows 7 versions. Which will you choose? Take our poll and let us know: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/itdojo/?p=906

hellfire
hellfire

What's more likely is you had a defective CPU to begin with. Happens.

microface
microface

I have customers with machine tools, and other computer controlled peripherals, and they all work under WINE, but even Windows 7 XP Mode refuses to run them all. So since Microsoft will not or can not provide support, we will migrate to something that will. Good bye Micro$oft

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

Depending on your upgrade path, you may or may not lose all the existing information on the HDD. If you reformat the drive any files you don't backup will be lost, including your drivers. In the video, I suggest that you check the vendor Web sites before installing Windows 7 so you don't find out your favorite printer or scanner doesn't work properly after the install. Furthermore, you can always download the driver files before installing Windows 7 and put them on a USB drive. This way, you have them on hand and can quickly install them after the Windows 7 install. Of course, you can update the drivers after the Windows 7 installation.

TechRepublic
TechRepublic

>Ok-with all the issues in the building of Vista why should we trust Windows 7? The quick answer is, you shouldn't. You could continue to use WinXP until the heat-death of the universe, but there are some better options... No professional should trust any OS for deployment on all of their systems without proper testing. This would have been my advice whether Vista was the greatest OS release known to man, or, well - Vista. Let's face it, MS blew the last release - granted. But what if the last Windows release was great, or the last two, or the last ten? Would you blindly move your office systems up to the newest version because you trust them? Of course not. Trust should never be a component of computer provisioning, whether it is hardware, software, OS, peripherals, networks, etc. It all has to be backed up, tested in a test cell, tested in limited exposure, then rolled-out with the option to roll-back. Every time. Did MS degrade our confidence with bad OS updates, yes. Does it affect the way you operate, it shouldn't. Chris in Snellville, GA, "where everybody's somebody"

mcdivitt
mcdivitt

I downloaded Windows 7 Hand love it. I purchased Vista Ultimate just a year ago and think it is wrong to have Windows7 after I paid $250.00 for vista. Windows 7 should be free to those who purchased Vista. It should be a free upgrade!!!! Thanks, JohnP. McDivitt

IT_Goddess
IT_Goddess

with my Verizon PC5750 on an Inspiron 9200 [2005] model, which started out with XP Pro, beta tested various flavors of Vista and is now running win7/7100.

Bill Detwiler
Bill Detwiler

Thanks for the additional Windows 7 resources. I'd like to send you a TechRepublic coffee mug and laptop sticker as a "thank you".

Meesha
Meesha

I agree. There's no reason to "jump" the bandwagon so soon. Vista was a complete disaster for so many both for business and for home. Even with a number SPs and years behind it, Vista is still not worthy. The question is not whether Win 7 will be but rather how much will it disrupt the business? Testing will take some time, especially with applications - out of the box or custom - that still have not been certified to work on Vista. TIME to test and deploy fresh, COST of upgrading period, COMPATIBILITY of existing apps not MS and drivers - these are just the tip of the berg. Are you willing to put your business or your client's business into shock? If Win7 is all that better than XP or Vista why has it taken so long deliver? Why have we had to wait since the late 90's to get what MS promised and keeps promising? Question should be more to 'why is the OS still relevant?'

griff.computerservices@ve
griff.computerservices@ve

You're absolutely correct to be *more* than skeptical about this release. How many times can you ride a three-legged pony before you realize that something is dreadfully askew? I suspect many have ridden that same pony more than once. Been there, done that.

msawyer91
msawyer91

My company offers employees their choice of operating system...XP or Vista, and those choosing Vista get Vista Enterprise. Since we're a Microsoft partner, complete with SA licensing, it makes sense to use Enterprise. It includes KMS for volume licensing and activation, and also includes BitLocker Drive Encryption, since end-user full-disk encryption is mandatory. That said, Windows 7 Enterprise will be the logical choice to succeed Vista (and probably XP as well). For home, I'd be perfectly happy with 7 Home Premium or Professional, but they don't include BitLocker. Well, they actually do--you can mount BDE-encrypted drives and write to them, but you can't encrypt new drives or change any encryption settings. Jason Hiner, your Editor in Chief, wrote a dynamite Open Letter to Microsoft, stressing they should have ONE version of Windows 7, with "enterprise features" available as a feature pack to enterprises that desire them. Here's the article: http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/hiner/?p=1755 I couldn't agree with Jason more. It would certainly clear up confusion for people. One thing I'd recommend is that the "one" version have BitLocker for all users. With so many people owning personal laptops for whatever reason--including recent high school graduates trotting off to college--encryption is a must. Whether your personal finances or term papers are stored on there, or perhaps unbecoming pictures of you at the frat party, you probably don't want a thief to be able to read all of your data. So until Microsoft gets its act together, it's Enterprise (with BitLocker) at work and Ultimate (with BitLocker) at home. Matt

larrytessari
larrytessari

The 64 bit version of Vista has become a nightmare. Each upgrade (not just Service Packs) has resulted in more and more hardware and software that doesn't work. I even have two pieces of hardware that refuse to run even with WORL certified drivers. And I have two software packages (Starry Nights and Quicken) that used to run fine until I installed SP2. I tend to believe that Driver Signature Enforcement is nothing but an extortion racket being foisted on hardware manufactures.

PaulK66
PaulK66

You said you were going to put up the link to Win 7 RC upgrade instructions. Thanks!

hellfire
hellfire

I've been running the RC of Windows 7 on my home machine for a while now and so far I've been fairly impressed by its performance. Notably for deployment in my office, I will be installing it on my workstation first and testing our company's apps with it, with the minor exception of our Drafting Department since they require high end machines that so far have ended up with XP64. From a cost perspective, there is absolutely no reason to upgrade existing machines to Windows 7. However, Windows 7 will be deployed with new machines as they arrive. Anything more than that is just asking for an administrative headache. As a network admin myself, I believe I'd prefer a slow adoption of Windows 7 as opposed to outright mass deployment.

jred
jred

As machines get replaced, I imagine they'll be moved to W7. That's only when we can no longer get XP. Personally, Vista has been fine, we see very few "Vista" issues in the field. The clamor of all the techs scared of something new has soured public opinion on Vista so much that no one wants to switch from XP. I know at least one tech that would still be on Win98 if he could. What do I know, though. I still prefer Slackware :)

Craig_B
Craig_B

I've already installed Windows 7 Enterprise x64 on my office computer. I did a clean install from DVD which went well. I have reinstalled all my programs (Office applications, administrative tools, etc.) and everything has worked well. The only problem I ran into was with Symantec Endpoint Protection 11. Windows 7 complains about a driver related to SEP and blocks it from loading. Symantec still seems to work ok though as I found the driver was related to IE and checking sites. I have tested out BitLocker to Go and it works quite well. The new Taskbar, Libraries, Jump Lists and all features I have tried have been easy to use and just work. Windows 7 seems more responsive than Vista. Overall in my few days of testing Windows 7 I?m very happy. We plan on doing more extensive testing and rolling out Windows 7 in the future. On the home front I preordered Windows 7 Home Premium and I'm looking forward to installing it there come October.

sars42
sars42

I've tried W7 on a low spec machine (P4 1Ghz 1Gb RAM) and it runs as quickly as XPSP3. In the office, I'll upgrade our XP machines to W7 after Microsoft release the first SP (probably late next year). As another poster mentioned, it's hard to justify the expense in the current climate.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Lay off the funny fags (PC twits) cigs mate. Lets say W7 would work on XP capable hardware, lets say all the drivers were out and worked, all software would work with no changes. In the current financial environment, how are you going to justify in dollars and cents just the roll out cost? W7 might be better than Vista, it at least should be better than XP. How many machines do you have to buy and or install it on it before the bean counters say no thanks. I stopped at three in my home set up, 10, 50 , 100, 10,000.... Very few admins are even going to consider upgrade in favour of clean install for starters. That's always been a nightmare on an established machine. Even if it works you are never sure that it did. I might be on W7 soon, certainly early next year at work (not Home Premium !) but that's because our customers will be popping into their local retail outlet and buying themselves one to run our software on. Internally, I could sell rewriting our entire code base in Algol easier.

artanbori
artanbori

Aoologies but honestly cannot understand why Mr Gates would get so upset Perhaps someone overheard him saying it while meaning that this will do for now Meanwhile"DOS addresses only 1 Megabyte of RAM because we cannot imagine any applications needing more." Microsoft on the development of DOS http://www.knowledgerush.com/kr/encyclopedia/Timeline_of_computing_1980-1989/ and 1977 "There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home." Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corporation. http://www.knowledgerush.com/kr/encyclopedia/Computing_timeline_1950-1979/

reisen55
reisen55

One of two on a terabyte drive, and I am long lived enough to have a redundant copy on an alternative machine. The explosion came when I backed the system down through a GHOST reimage of primary OS drive to Windows XP and the partition blew. There was no reason for Windows 7 to go downstairs to a secondary drive and do that but it does. Now, imagine if this was a CLIENT system, perhaps say a lawyer.............

SgtPappy
SgtPappy

....I thought your presentation was outstanding too. Here is a link to some news and resources for Windows 7. I've got a hot pot of coffee and nothing to put it in.

Shaun.G
Shaun.G

Perhaps part of the issue is the demands of the entire IT community (including MS itself). On the one hand, the IT community says that MS produces software too quickly with unreasonable delivery dates, or not meeting the set delivery date, while on the other hand, the same IT Community is asking why is it taking so long to deliver... Would it not be more reasonable to ease up on the delivery expectations pressure, allow MS to complete the work, to a good standard that is acceptable to all within the IT community, as opposed to constantly applying pressure? Perhaps part of the failed delivery is the constant factor of industry pressure to deliver bigger, better, more functional, more control, more secure etc type products. Would you not agree? I have been out of the IT industry a number of years, and have not used Vista, nor tested Win 7... mostly because my pc is not compatible with it, and I am happy with WinXP SP3. However, I may consider buying a pcwith Win7 on it. I am as yet not convinced, but as some here claim, Win7 appears to be more stable than Vista, which is already an improvement on the forum comments about Vista at the same stage. At least this is my perception. I am open to correction on these issues.

I have in the past two days installed Windows 7 on two separate systems. One was a clean install on a desktop and the other was an in place upgrade from Vista SP2 on a laptop. Problems have been limited to a PCI memory controller on the laptop (Intel proprietary hardware.) All of our current software including our Customer Relations Management program have loaded up and run on the first try. Boot and shut down times have been significantly reduced, integration with current Active Directory policies have not been an issue. I can backup systems on a regular basis which is especially helpful with the laptops in use with our on the road sales force. We will definitely consider bit-Blocker technology for those users. This is like the ME to XP upgrade I will be really happy to migrate away from XP as it is full of security holes and the installation has also become labor intensive (patches and updates even with SP3) still take hours to complete. I am not going to defend Microsoft ME and Vista were not ready for prime-time Vista until SP2 was useable in a work environment but just barely. So I have waited the 2+ years while Microsoft used us a test subjects (again) to get it right and I am glad I did.

dareeves
dareeves

I agree. Windows is going down the road of been there done that. Maybe it's just another of those things we wish to see stay stuck in the 80's. For MS to actually have an XP mode built in is just as if it was Win95 with DOS mode, etc. I could be wrong, although I'm no donkey, I think microsoft is starting to be outdated. Problem is nothing has come to replace it. As an avid computer user for over 25 yrs, that's sad.

blarman
blarman

We still get Windows XP from PC vendors. We had huge problems with programs and drivers when we tested Vista, and it took a lot of work to overcome those. Then the users had a hard time adapting to the new interface. So we bagged a general deployment of Vista entirely. I suspect that when the vendors no longer allow us to purchase Windows XP, we'll be forced to go to Windows 7. I just hope that we don't encounter all the same problems we ran into with Vista.

champ222
champ222

Well my answer is yes....i have tried the beta v7100 and have no probs at all. In all i have no issues with imploying windows 7 in my orginisation, it may be small but i have found it self heals itself if a major error is caused. I have tried to kill the beta version but have not exceeded. At last microsoft have manage to get it right.....At last!!!!!!

reisen55
reisen55

Claiming a successful product launch and a stable one after installation on TWO SYSTEMS!!!!!!!!!!!! Wow! I am deeply impressed. Cannot wait to see your rollout across your company.

reisen55
reisen55

There is a world of difference between a technical professional running Windows 7 - we generally know what we are doing and can repair easily - as opposed to our clients running it where disaster can occur. Am I willing to put their businesses out of business JUST BECAUSE BALLMER says it is OK this time around? I don't think so. Secondly, Linux is a great thing but again my client's apps are not LINUX BASED so I would not even consider it there.

hellfire
hellfire

Many hardware manufacturers (like nVidia) are already developing drivers for Windows 7. Unless you are using some oddball piece of custom equipment or other non-mainstream hardware, you can certainly expect driver problems. But, for the majority of the common equipment, there are already Windows 7 drivers available.

Gis Bun
Gis Bun

Unsure why you are in a rush to move to Windows 7 that fast when with a street release date of October, many hardware manufacturers won't have Win7 compliant drivers out yet [although most Vista drivers should work with Win7]. If you wait a couple of months [assuming they will support the OS with your system] I'm sure Lenovo will have the appropriate drivers. Remember that Ubuntu is open source. The drivers will most likely be generic drivers and not the full drivers that would be supplied by the manufacturer. [The same goes for Windows, you can install just the basic stuff or actually get the fully featured drivers.]

PaulK66
PaulK66

First I want to say I am running Win7 64 bit on my Lenovo T400 and the new quad core gaming box I just built and the performance and stability has been as good as (or better G_d forbid) as my Ubuntu boxes. Vista on the T400 was so unstable to be unusable. The funny thing was the Win 7 install took several hours of installing drivers to get everything working (except for GPS) while everything (except for GPS & fingerprint reader) worked out of the box with Ubuntu! The compatibility troubleshooting seems to really work well. I am ticked at Cisco for lagging on drivers for win 7 or Vista, especially 64 bit drivers. I have a brand new Linysys usb B/G wifi card that is SOL in 64 bit Vista or Win 7. Same for VPN but luckily we have both a Juniper SSL VPN and Cisco since they aren't writing 64 bit IPSEC drivers to try and force you to upgrade to their SSL VPN.

blarman
blarman

The problem is that Windows (and most operating systems to be honest) is "good enough". For those with a marketing background, this means that the product has reached the point in the maturity curve where improvements no longer justify their value in the product's price, i.e. bloatware. They were almost there with Windows 2000, but with XP SP1, it really did reach the point where people had everything they generally needed in a PC. Consumers saw right through Vista for exactly what it was: a facelift on a product that wasn't significantly different. Now I know that supposedly there were "security" improvements in Vista. The problem was, these are things that to most consumers A) should have been there in the first place and B) caused more problems than they fixed (UAC anyone). Couple that with the outrageous prices Microsoft was demanding for the product, and there just wasn't a good value proposition. I sure hope Microsoft learns their lesson and puts Windows 7 out at a lower price point than Vista. Given the state of the economy, the real lack of consumer value, and the abundant alternatives, it just doesn't justify the premium price Microsoft has been accustomed to getting.

tom
tom

I'm curious how you are going to upgrade them to Windows 7 when it is released? Format and install clean as recommended, or use the workaround to upgrade from the rc to the release version? Hopefully you won't be charging them extra when the RC times out in June.

war1986
war1986

I've been building custom computers and offered to put Windows 7 RC on to my clients and every single one that has said yes has not regretted it. No driver problems, no blue screens, no crashes, and not nearly as bad of a resource hog as Vista. Windows 7 is basically Vista done right (why isn't it free then???) and I have had no problem what so ever. I also administer a server and have 1/4 of the computers (with daily backups of course) on Windows 7 using XP as a fall back, but have not needed XP at all. Microsoft finally did something right, but they are making sure we pay for it.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Up to press he's found one issue with our software under W7, now fixed. Our software is completely Vista compatible though..... MS are still getting things wrong, why would installing SQL2008, change the alignment of a label in in a 3rd party Win32 grid component? Column heading label went from middle-centre to bottom-centre. Vertical alignment is not an option within the control, so they've changed the default in one of the win32 dlls... PS turned out to be to be one of the service packs that SQL2008 forced to install so it could run. To fix it, I'm going to have to either replace that component everywhere it's used, or change it's source, from that provided by the vendor, and then stay in step. Thank you Redmond.... No really, I'm mean I was running out of things to do. Oh and we're not small, we're huge, and where there's one issue, there are another ten you haven't found yet.

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